Skip header and navigation

173 records – page 1 of 9.

Wood opportunities for manufactured housing and structural components

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1325
Author
Robichaud, F.
Lavoie, P.
Gaston, Chris
Date
March 2005
Edition
37802
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Robichaud, F.
Lavoie, P.
Gaston, Chris
Date
March 2005
Edition
37802
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Prefabricated houses
Markets
Series Number
Special Publication ; SP-47
W-2322
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Prefabricated houses - Markets
Buildings - Houses - Markets
Building components - Markets
Documents
Less detail

Impact of ground roughness on the productivity of CLT machines - a case study in Nova Scotia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49458
Author
Gingras, Jean-François
Date
February 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gingras, Jean-François
Date
February 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Roughness
Productivity
Surfaces
Series Number
Internal Report ; IR 2005 02 04
Language
English
Abstract
Ground roughness is a difficult parameter to quantify because it represents a combination of surface features, including boulders (large and small), bedrock outcrops, steep pitches, and broken terrain (ledges, cliffs). Ground roughness can also be compounded by steep slopes (short or long) and even by soft areas that represent obstacles that must be worked around at the expense of productivity.
Documents
Less detail

Comparative analysis of MSR equipment

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2813
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Bédard, P.
Date
May 2005
Edition
39443
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Bédard, P.
Date
May 2005
Edition
39443
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Stresses
Saw mills
Equipment
Grading
Series Number
General Revenue Report Project No. 3242
E-4796
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
This study compared the performances of MSR grading machines currently used by the Canadian lumber industry. It covered five models: HCLT-7200 from Metriguard, Dart from Eldeco, TMG from CRIQ, Dynagrade from Dynalyse AB and XLG from Coe Mfg.
Lumber manufacturing
Sawmills - Equipment
Grading - Lumber - Stress, Mechanical
Documents
Less detail

Analyse comparative des équipements MSR

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2814
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Bédard, P.
Date
May 2005
Edition
39444
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Bédard, P.
Date
May 2005
Edition
39444
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Stresses
Saw mills
Equipment
Grading
Series Number
Projet General Revenue No 3242
E-4797
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Cette étude compare les performances des différentes machines de classement MSR utilisées actuellement dans l’industrie canadienne du bois de sciage. Cinq machines ont été retenues : La HCLT-7200 de Metriguard, la Dart de Eldeco, la TMG du CRIQ, la Dynagrade de Dynalyse AB et la XLG de Coe Mfg.
Lumber manufacturing
Sawmills - Equipment
Grading - Lumber - Stress, Mechanical
Documents
Less detail

24 month evaluation of novel UV protection systems. Second Year Report 2004/05

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4530
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Date
March 2005
Edition
41317
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2005
Edition
41317
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 35;3226
W-2134
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A transparent coating with long-term performance could help wood maintain its share of residential markets against material substitution and potentially expand markets in recreational property and non-residential buildings. While transparent coatings can be made reasonably resistant to UV some UV likely penetrates to the wood and by necessity clear coatings are transparent to visible light. Visible light can also cause damage over the long term thus the underlying wood needs additional protection. Four novel UV protection systems were tested as pre-treatments on uncoated wood and under three coatings, a water-based film forming coating, a water-based acrylic varnish and a solvent based water repellent. Samples were exposed to natural weathering facing South at 45° at a test site in Gulfport, Mississippi, in collaboration with the USDA Forest Products Laboratory. The test material was inspected every six months for discolouration, mold and stain, coating water repellency, flaking, erosion and cracking and substrate condition. After 24 months exposure, coatings over the combination of UV absorber and lignin stabilizer identified by Stephen Ayer were performing better than the same coatings applied over the combination recommended by Ciba and coatings over both pre-treatments were performing substantially better than controls with no pre-treatment. Projection of fitted curves beyond the data appears to indicate that pretreatment may double the life expectancy of the coating. There was no consistent effect of the synergists on either combination at this time.
Preservatives - Tests
Finishes - Exterior - Tests
Documents
Less detail

Fire resistance & sound transmission/noise control in wood-frame buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42312
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Sound transmission
Resistance
Acoustic
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 4
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Buildings - Fire resistance
Sound
Noise
Buildings - Acoustics
Documents
Less detail

Fire losses in non-residential buildings : final report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42313
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Statistics
Statistical analysis
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 5
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Fires, Building
Statistics
Documents
Less detail

Effect of resin application sequence, content, and powder/liquid combination ratio on OSB performance

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42314
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Wan, Hui
Date
July 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Wan, Hui
Date
July 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
43 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Resin
Oriented strandboard
Application
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 2689
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Powder and liquid phenol-formaldehyde (PF) combination binder system has been commonly used in North America for oriented strand board (OSB) manufacturing. This binder system has shown its suitability for improving resin efficiency and bond quality as compared with either powder PF (PPF) or liquid PF (LPF) resin. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of resin application sequence (LPF-PPF-LPF, LPF-PPF, PPF-LPF), resin content (3.0%, 5.5%, 8.0%), and PPF/LPF combination ratio (50:50, 65:35, 80:20) on strand board performance. Board properties evaluated include internal bond (IB), thickness swelling (TS), water absorption (WA), dry and wet modulus of rupture (MOR), dry modulus of elasticity (MOE), edgewise shear, and compression shear strength. In addition, a non-destructive test method (TROBEND) developed at Forintek was also used to measure the modulus of elasticity (MOE) and shear modulus of elasticity (G). Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was used in the experiment design. Significant response surface models were established for individual panel properties, including the linear model for IB, dry MOR, dry MOE, and compression shear, as well as the quadric model for TS, WA, and wet MOR, and 2FI (two factor interaction) for edgewise shear. ANOVA for response surface model indicated that the resin content was a significant model term for IB, TS, dry MOR and MOE, wet MOR, and compression shear properties. An increase in resin content improved these board properties. Powder/liquid ratio was a significant model term for TS, WA, and wet MOR. Resin application sequence was not a significant model term for any panel property, but its interaction with resin content was a significant model term for edgewise shear property. In most cases, the interactions between experimental variables were not significant model terms for predicting panel properties, but they still revealed some trends. Regarding Sequence 3 (PPF-LPF), 50:50 PPF/LPF ratio (lower level) resulted in higher IB, dry MOR, and compression shear, while 80:20 PPF/LPF (higher level) yielded lower WA and higher dry MOE. For Sequence 2 (LPF-PPF), 65:35 PPF/LPF ratio (middle level) favoured TS, while 50:50 PPF/LPF ratio (lower level) favoured wet MOR. Sequence 1 (LPF-PPF-LPF) combined with 50:50 PPF/LPF ratio (lower level) also gave lower WA values. In general, an increase in resin content improved the board properties with the above combinations. In addition, Sequence 3 (PPF-LPF), with 3.0% resin (lower level), yielded higher edgewise shear strength regardless of resin application sequence. An attempt was made to correlate the panel mechanical properties measured using both destructive and non-destructive test methods. The strongest correlation was observed between IB and compression shear (R2=0.70), followed by TORBEND G with modulus of elasticity (TORBEND MOE) (R2=0.40), and TORBEND G with compression shear (R2=0.28) and with IB (R2=0.26). However, no correlation seemed to exist between MOE (static bending) and TROBEND MOE. An image analysis indicated that an increase in resin content significantly increased resin coverage on strand surface. At each resin content (3.0%, 5.5%, and 8.0%), a decrease in PPF/LPF ratio in Sequence 1 (LPF-PPF-LPF) or an increase PPF/LPF ratio in sequence 3 (PPF-LPF) seemed to result in higher resin coverage. Resin coverage seemed to correlate to TS (R2=0.45), IB (R2=0.42), compression shear (R2=0.39), TORBEND G (R2=0.39), dry MOR (R2=0.25), wet MOR (R2=0.25), and dry MOE (R2=0.18). However, resin coverage did not seem to correlate to WA, TORBEND MOE, or edgewise shear properties.
Resin application
OSB
Documents
Less detail

Procédures de contrôle du procédé, de l'opération et de la qualité : poste de délignage et de refente

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42315
Author
Goulet, P.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Goulet, P.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
34 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Process control
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 3653
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Le contrôle de la qualité des produits est effectué dans la majorité des scieries mais à divers degrés d’intensité. Il est de plus souvent effectué à la fin du procédé, généralement à l’usine de rabotage alors que les produits sont prêts à l’expédition. Il est rarement basé sur des procédures statistiques standardisées spécifiques à chaque poste-clé de transformation à la scierie. L’objectif général de ce projet de recherche est d’établir des procédures de contrôle du procédé permettant d’obtenir une efficacité optimale des équipements et ce, pour toutes les étapes importantes du procédé de transformation du bois dans une scierie. Les résultats sont présentés sous la forme d’une série de guides portant sur des procédures particulières au poste de transformation visé. Ces guides s’adressent aux contrôleurs de qualité des scieries et à toute personne en charge de l’optimisation des procédés. Ils constituent une excellente source d’information pour établir un programme de contrôle du procédé. Le présent document est consacré au poste de délignage et de refente. Les sections du guide couvrent les points suivants :
Mise au point de l’équipement : cette section détaille les éléments importants à vérifier pour assurer le fonctionnement adéquat de l’équipement. À cet effet, une attention particulière est portée aux systèmes d’alimentation, de scannage et de positionnement de la machine.
Optimisation de l’opération : cette partie survole le rôle de l’opérateur (systèmes manuel et optimisé) et s’attarde également à bien cerner les paramètres d’optimisation dont la compréhension et la maîtrise sont cruciales au fonctionnement optimal de la machine.
Contrôle de la qualité : cette section propose des procédures simplifiées de contrôle journalier sur des points critiques de l’équipement. On s’assure ainsi de maintenir le niveau de performance du poste de délignage et de refente à son meilleur.
Finalement, la dernière section du document fournie une méthode pour faire l’évaluation de la performance d’une déligneuse optimisée et la comparer aux résultats standards de l’industrie.
Des annexes proposent des formulaires pour les différentes méthodes proposées.
Quality control
Process control
Edgers
Documents
Less detail

Rapport de mission technologique : Interzum/Ligna : fabrication de meuble, Allemagne

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42317
Author
Lihra, T.
Date
May 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lihra, T.
Date
May 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Technological innovation
Europe
Furniture
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Le sujet du présent rapport est une mission technologique en Allemagne qui a eu lieu du 30 avril au 6 mai 2005. La mission combine les visites de deux salons (Interzum et Ligna) avec neuf visites d’entreprises reliées à la fabrication de meubles.
Technological innovations
Furniture industry
Documents
Less detail

Profitability of breakdown methods according to taper

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42319
Author
Goulet, P.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Goulet, P.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Sawing
Recovery
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 4498
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
It is generally acknowledged that tree-stem taper can significantly affect lumber recovery during breakdown, and that rapid tree growth, particularly after stand thinning, results in stems with more pronounced taper when harvested. Taper has always been a challenge for sawmills and many have debated which log breakdown method to choose so as to minimize its impact on lumber recovery. The introduction of optimized positioning tables has quieted these debates, since this technology has facilitated the optimal positioning of each two-sided cant (hereafter “cant”) prior to breakdown. However, positioning optimization is limited when secondary breakdown equipment consists of a canter followed by a bull edger. In fact, the restrictions on cant offsetting and opening of the canter heads have an even greater negative impact on logs with extreme taper, since the fibre in the tapered section is processed into chips. Some in the industry have developed and implemented a breakdown method called “bottle sawing”. Our study recommends a variation of this method, known as “half-bottle sawing”, which maximizes recovery of lumber from the log’s tapered section by limiting taper to one side only. One of the canter heads remains in the same position during breakdown but at about one third of the log length, the second head opens up to a width equivalent to a nominal 1 or 2 inch piece. The Optitek breakdown simulator was used to determine whether this method results in greater lumber recovery than current sawmill methods. Two groups of logs were selected on length basis (16 and 12 foot logs), with each group further broken down by taper class (light, average and heavy). Results show that half-bottle sawing is best for mills processing logs that are 12 foot long, or more, on lines featuring cant positioning tables in front of the canter, regardless of taper class. The half-bottle method yields more lumber pieces from the tapered section of the log by opening up one of the canter heads, so long as the log is adequately secured in the breakdown system. Monetary gains, ranging from 6.5 to 8.9% for 16 foot logs, and ranging from 4.0 to 5.1% for 12 foot logs, were achieved by using the half-bottle sawing method rather than the optimized canter breakdown method. We noted that longer logs generated higher gains, but that heavier taper does not translate into higher gains. Half-bottle breakdown is therefore an attractive alternative to a breakdown line with a positioning table in front of a canter. Nevertheless, the best breakdown system for lumber recovery is one that includes an optimization table in front of a bull edger, because such a system has fewer positioning restrictions.
Taper
Recovery
Sawing - Breakdown
Documents
Less detail

Procédure de contrôle du procédé, de l'opération et de la qualité : la raboteuse

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42323
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Process control
Planing
Series Number
Projet General Revenue no 3653
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
L’objectif général de ce projet de recherche est d’établir des procédures de contrôle du procédé visant la production de produits conformes aux normes à chaque étape du procédé de transformation à l’aide d’équipements fonctionnant avec une efficacité maximale. Le présent document est consacré à la raboteuse. Son contenu se détaille en quatre parties : les méthodes de mise au point selon un horaire suggéré, les responsabilités de l’opérateur et la mesure de la productivité, le contrôle de qualité de fabrication du produit, les standards de l’industrie et le calcul des pertes. Des tableaux de compilation de données sont aussi fournis à titre d’exemple. La particularité des prises de données dans ce document réside à cocher une caractéristique obtenue dans une carte de contrôle. Cette méthode permet de visualiser graphiquement la performance de l’équipement au cours des dernières heures et des derniers jours en un seul regard. Une action corrective peut alors être entreprise rapidement ou être planifiée si une caractéristique tend à s’éloigner des critères de performance exigés.
Quality control
Process control
Planing
Documents
Less detail

Effects of different refining process conditions on the properties of high density fibreboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42324
Author
Deng, James
Date
September 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Deng, James
Date
September 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Refining
Panels
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 4490
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In this project, a study was carried out to investigate the effects of different refining parameters on the properties of dry-process fibreboard, in particular, high density fibreboard as the substrate for flooring products. Refining temperature (as quantified by steam pressure), retention time of preheating, refining specific energy, and speed of the refining were investigated as factors contributing to the physical and mechanical properties of fibreboard. A total of 18 different refining runs were carried out, and 36 laboratory high density fibreboards were produced. The experiment results show that panel stability can be improved substantially and thickness swell can be reduced by optimizing a ‘fit for purpose’ refining strategy.
Fibreboard - Manufacture
Panels - Properties
Refining process
Documents
Less detail

Limiting conditions for mould growth

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42325
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
73 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Growth
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 24
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Moulds - Growth
Buildings
Documents
Less detail

Impact de la vitesse de l'air sur le taux de séchage de l'épinette noire

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42328
Author
Normand, D.
Lavoie, Vincent
Date
October 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Normand, D.
Lavoie, Vincent
Date
October 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Transfer
Simulation
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Drying
Kilns
Heat transfer
Heat
Air
Series Number
Projet General Revenue no 4033
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
La circulation de l’air est essentielle (en séchage conventionnel et par déshumidification) pour le transfert de la chaleur nécessaire au réchauffement du bois, à l’évaporation de l’eau de surface et au transport de cette humidité. Plus la vitesse de l’air est élevée, plus le taux de transfert d’énergie à la surface du bois est grand. Ceci se traduit par une augmentation du taux d’évaporation de l’eau à la surface du bois Quel gain de productivité peut-on obtenir à la suite d’une augmentation de la vitesse de l’air de 100 pi/min? Cette étude a pour objectif de déterminer l’impact de la vitesse de l’air sur la productivité, la qualité et la consommation énergétique du séchage du bois de construction ÉPS de l’est du Canada. Initialement, le logiciel de modélisation Drytek a été utilisé pour étudier l’effet de la vitesse de l’air sur la productivité du séchage. Les résultats des modélisations du sapin baumier, du pin gris et de l’épinette noire ont démontré un effet positif sur la productivité à la suite de l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. Des essais de laboratoire ont été faits sur du bois de construction d’épinette noire 2x4x8’ provenant de la région du Lac-St-Jean au Québec. Ces essais utilisant le même programme de séchage dicté par la teneur en humidité ont été réalisés pour quatre vitesses de l’air différentes soit 300, 600, 900 et 1200 pi/min. L’étude a démontré que la vitesse de l’air a un impact sur la productivité du séchage d’environ 2 % par augmentation de 100 pi/min de la vitesse de l’air considérant une teneur en humidité initiale de 40 % et une teneur en humidité finale de 15 %. Les gains de temps de séchage ont été obtenus uniquement de l’état vert au point de saturation des fibres (PSF). Le PSF correspond à une teneur en humidité de 25 à 30 %. Mentionnons qu‘aucune diminution du temps de séchage n’a été observée sous le PSF à la suite de l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. Ainsi, une teneur en humidité initiale supérieure à 40 % procure des gains supérieurs à 2 % par 100 pi/min et une teneur en humidité initiale inférieure à 40 % procure des gains inférieurs à cette valeur. Les variations de teneur en humidité finale entre les pièces et à l’intérieur des pièces sont similaires pour les essais réalisés à différentes vitesses de l’air. Ceci révèle une qualité des sciages semblable entre les essais. De même, le gauchissement évalué visuellement dans les empilements ne montrait pas de différence significative. La consommation électrique spécifique du système de ventilation est respectivement de 0,1, 0,2, 0,6 et 1,0 kWh/kgeau évaporée pour les essais réalisés à 300, 600, 900 et 1200 pi/min. Cette consommation spécifique est applicable uniquement au séchoir de laboratoire utilisé. Des données industrielles préliminaires nous permettent de croire que la consommation électrique spécifique de l’épinette noire est 0,06, 0,11, 0,14 et 0,18 kWh/kgeau évaporée pour les séchoirs industriels les plus efficaces avec les mêmes vitesses de l’air respectives mentionnées plus haut. Ces valeurs sont à confirmer dans une deuxième phase du projet. Des calculs économiques relatifs aux gains en productivité obtenus par l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air montrent qu’il est possible d’augmenter les revenus annuels pour une capacité de séchage donnée. Un gain en productivité d’environ 2 % par augmentation de 100 pi/min de la vitesse de l’air se traduit par une augmentation des revenus de 1$/Mpmp séché pour un différentiel de prix sec-vert de 50 $/Mpmp. L’augmentation passe à 2$/Mpmp pour un différentiel de prix sec-vert de 100$/Mpmp. Les coûts additionnels doivent cependant être soustraits de ces revenus potentiels pour obtenir le profit additionnel associé à l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. À titre d’exemple, la modification ou l’ajout de déflecteurs ou l’ajustement de l’angle des pales des ventilateurs peuvent procurer des augmentations de la vitesse de l’air à coût très minime pour l’entreprise. La modification ou l’ajout de déflecteurs n’entraînera pas d’augmentation de la consommation électrique significative puisque la même quantité d’air par unité de temps est déplacée. Le changement du système de ventilation pour un système plus puissant impliquera un certain coût en capital et une hausse de la consommation électrique par Mpmp séché. Les coûts additionnels d’opération reliés à ces changements devront être pris en considération avant de procéder à une modification. Il est possible d’optimiser la gestion de la vitesse de l’air en fonction de l’étape de séchage de façon à réduire davantage les coûts d’énergie électrique reliés au système de ventilation, En effet, la vitesse des ventilateurs peut être réduite lorsque la teneur en humidité du bois se situe sous le PSF. Une étude réalisée précédemment chez Forintek a démontré qu’il est possible de réduire la consommation électrique du système de ventilation sans affecter la productivité des séchoirs en abaissant la vitesse des ventilateurs sous le PSF. La présente étude confirme que sous le PSF aucun gain en productivité n’est réalisé par une augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. Les usines ayant déjà des vitesses de l’air élevées ont donc intérêt à baisser la vitesse de rotation en fin séchage pour profiter d’économies d’énergie non négligeables. La détermination du PSF et l’utilisation d’un variateur de vitesse sur le système de ventilation sont nécessaires pour réaliser les gains. Un logiciel a été utilisé dans le cadre de cette étude pour modéliser l’écoulement de l’air dans un séchoir expérimental de Forintek. L’écoulement de l’air dans le séchoir avec un empilement réel a été modélisé. Par la suite, la vitesse de l’air obtenue à la sortie de l’empilement par modélisation a été comparée à celle mesurée réellement dans le séchoir. Des valeurs similaires entre la modélisation et la réalité démontrent le potentiel d’un tel outil pour simuler des modifications au niveau de la géométrie d’un séchoir donné. L’impact direct d’une modification (ex : ajout de déflecteurs, angle des déflecteurs et du toit) sur l’écoulement de l’air pourrait être vérifié avant de procéder aux modifications du séchoir. En résumé, il est très important de considérer les points suivants lors d’une modification du système de ventilation:
Favoriser le passage de l’air dans les empilements. Il faut s’assurer d’avoir de bonnes pratiques de lattage et d’empilement et d’utiliser adéquatement les déflecteurs.
Optimiser l’angle des pales des ventilateurs, ce qui permet d’utiliser adéquatement la puissance installée des moteurs.
S’assurer de la disponibilité de l’énergie calorifique. En effet, la même quantité d’énergie calorifique sera nécessaire pour sécher la même quantité de bois, mais dans un intervalle de temps plus court.
Envisager l’utilisation d’un variateur de vitesse pour diminuer la ventilation en dessous du PSF. Cette mesure favorise la réduction de la consommation énergétique.
Considérer l’impact de la vitesse de l’air sur les systèmes de contrôle utilisant le DTAB (différence de température à travers le bois). La modification de la vitesse de l’air peut modifier les lectures des DTAB habituelles et nécessiter des ajustements des programmes de séchage. Des travaux supplémentaires s’avèrent nécessaires pour compléter les recommandations générées par ce projet. Dans la prochaine année, le sapin baumier et le pin gris seront testés pour déterminer le gain en productivité potentiel de l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air pour ces essences. La gestion et l’utilisation de la consommation électrique des systèmes de ventilation industriels seront également approfondies. Les différents travaux seront réalisés en collaboration avec le Laboratoire des technologies de l’énergie d’Hydro-Québec à Shawinigan dans le cadre du programme ÉlectroBois II.
Seasoning - Kiln drying - Computer simulation
Air flow
Heat transfer
Documents
Less detail

Impact d'un changement de la classe de qualité de l'approvisionnement sur la productivité

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42329
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
July 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
July 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
15 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Secondary manufacturing
Productivity
Series Number
Projet General Revenue no 4501
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
L’utilisation d’une classe de qualité inférieure d’approvisionnement est une possibilité envisageable afin de réduire les coûts de production. Les calculs de productivité doivent tenir compte de la variation du temps de transformation engendrée par des manipulations additionnelles de planches afin d’éliminer les défauts plus nombreux et l’utilisation d’une plus grande quantité de planches afin de compléter la même commande. L’entretien des équipements de coupe doit également être considéré. Pour un procédé de transformation de délignage en tête, les résultats obtenus indiquent que la productivité est peu influencée par la classe de qualité de l’approvisionnement ainsi que par l’ordre de priorité de la production, prix ou surface. Pour un procédé de transformation de tronçonnage en tête, les résultats obtenus indiquent que la productivité est influencée par la classe de qualité d’approvisionnement. Un approvisionnement de classe de qualité Sélect permet d’obtenir un volume de production quotidien supérieur. Les classes de qualité 1 Commun et 2A Commun permettent d’obtenir un volume de production quotidien pratiquement équivalent.
Lumber - Defects
Productivity
Secondary manufacturing
Documents
Less detail

Process, operational and quality control procedures : edging and resaw station

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42331
Author
Goulet, P.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Goulet, P.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Process control
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 3653
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Product quality control is performed by a majority of sawmills, but to varying degrees of intensity. It is more often done at the end of the process, generally in the planing mill once the products are ready for shipping. It is rarely based on standardized statistical quality control procedures specific to key sawmill processing stations. The general objective of this research project is to establish quality control procedures to ensure optimal operating efficiency of sawmill equipment at every major step in the manufacturing process. The results are presented in the form of a series of guidelines for specific procedures at target processing stations. These guidelines are intended for sawmill quality controllers and those in charge of process optimization. They are an excellent source of information for setting up a process control program. This report covers the edging and resaw station. The guidelines cover the following points:
Equipment fine tuning: this section provides a checklist of essential elements to ensure the equipment is running properly. Special attention is paid to the infeed, scanning and position systems on the machine.
Optimization of operations: this part addresses the role of the operator (in manual and optimized systems) and focuses on clarifying optimization parameters, an understanding and mastery of which are crucial to optimal machine operation.
Quality control: this section suggests simplified daily control procedures for critical equipment areas. The goal is to ensure top performance of the edging and resaw station.
Finally, the last section of the document provides a performance evaluation procedure for an optimized edger along with a comparison with industry standards.
Included in the appendices are forms for the various proposed procedures.
Quality control
Process control
Edgers
Documents
Less detail

Evaluation of short log processing equipment

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42332
Author
McDonald, J. David
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
McDonald, J. David
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Short wood
Processing
Logs
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 4012
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Due to the scarcity of quality logs, the hardwood lumber manufacturing industry has been compelled to rely more and more heavily on lower grade or size logs, with a significant impact on the profitability of existing operations. Tests conducted in a conventional sawmill equipped with a carriage and a resaw show that the conversion of 6 and 7-foot short logs entails losses of $85/Mbf for hard maple and $103/Mbf for white birch. An additional sample of below grade hard maple logs, 8 feet and over in lengths, selected from previous studies, led to even more severe losses of $121/Mbf. Only the better quality below grade logs and those in diameter classes over 30 cm generated profits; unfortunately, such diameters represent only a very small percentage of the available resource. According to our simulations, a conventional mill cutting about 500 sawlogs per shift could include up to 70% hard maple short logs in its regular production before getting into a loss situation. If the same mill used short or below grade logs exclusively, it would have to process over 900 short logs or 725 below grade logs to reach the breakeven point. To generate a 10% profit, it would have to process some 1100 short logs or 900 below grade logs. Such productivity levels are only achievable with more linear manufacturing processes. Our simulations showed that the addition of a second production line equipped with an end-dogging carriage system to process 1300 hard maple short logs per shift would barely cover costs, profits being in the order of $9/Mbf, i.e. $181,000/year. The drastic escalation of production costs due to the second line limits the effect of greater productivity on the expected profitability of the mill. The second line would need to process 1800 maple short logs per shift for the mill to achieve 10% profits, i.e. $71/Mbf or $1.8 million/year. This level of productivity can be obtained with twin saws fed with a sharp chain rather then an end-dogging carriage system. Hardwood lumber producers should consider producing lumber that meets specific client requirements rather than simply meeting NHLA rules. Just by grading our lower grade boards on their better face to recover a certain percentage of clear cuttings instead of applying NHLA rules, we increased the value of our maple and birch products by $26/Mbf and $18/Mbf respectively with negligible impact on volume. Significantly greater gains are achievable. If the whole production was graded to NHLA rules on its better face, it would be possible to generate 31% more #1 Common & Better maple and 46% more #1 Common & Better birch. In addition, the percentage of sapwood boards would increase by 5% with both species.
Short logs
Processing equipment
Documents
Less detail

Évaluation de la capacité de détection des défauts du bois de sciage de différents systèmes automatisés

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42348
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Scanning
Series Number
Profil technologique ; TP-04-05E
E-4004
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
L’automatisation du procédé de débitage secondaire est une solution d’actualité pour aider les industriels oeuvrant dans la deuxième transformation du bois à maximiser l’utilisation de la matière première de plus en plus rare et coûteuse. À cet égard, l’intégration d’un système automatisé permettant la détection de défauts du bois de sciage offre un potentiel de croissance de rendement, de performance et de compétitivité. Afin de fournir un outil d’aide à la sélection d’un système de détection de défauts, Forintek a réalisé une évaluation expérimentale d’équipements commercialement disponibles. Dix-neuf fabricants oeuvrant dans le domaine de la détection des défauts dans le bois ont été contactés. De ce nombre, quatre ont accepté de participer à l’étude. Ce projet résulte de la demande d’industriels, l’évaluation ne concernant que la capacité de détection de défauts prédéfinis et non la performance de l’ensemble du système. Des défauts ont été identifiés et, suite à une évaluation expérimentale, il a été possible de déterminer si les systèmes détectaient ou non la présence de ces défauts. Un outil d’aide à la décision développé à partir de méthodes multicritères est proposé dans le rapport complet afin de permettre aux industriels d’identifier le système le plus approprié. Cependant, aucun commentaire n’y est fait sur la performance des équipements puisque les besoins diffèrent pour chacun.
Defects - Detection
Documents
Less detail

An evaluation of the detection capacity of automated defect detection systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42349
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Scanning
Series Number
Technology Profile ; TP-04-05E
E-4005
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Using automation to maximise yield from increasingly rare and costly raw materials is a solution that can help secondary wood producers improve their profitability. By integrating an automated defect detection system, lumber producers can potentially increase production output and grade recovery, helping them to strengthen their strategic business advantage. To develop a reference tool to assist in the choice of an appropriate defect detection system, Forintek conducted a detection capacity evaluation of commercially available equipment. Nineteen (19) manufacturers who work in the area of defect detection in lumber were contacted; of these, four agreed to participate in the study. The project objectives were based on requests from the producers: the evaluation focussed on the detection capacity of specific defects and not on the performance of the overall system. Defects were identified and an experimental evaluation was conducted to determine if the equipment recognised the defects or not. A decision tool based on a multi-criteria analysis has been proposed in the completed project report, to help producers identify the most appropriate defect detection system. However, no evaluation can be offered for the overall performance of the systems assessed, as production needs differ from producer to producer.
Defects - Detection
Documents
Less detail

173 records – page 1 of 9.