Skip header and navigation

Refine Search

285 records – page 1 of 29.

Optimizing extraction distance in commercial thinning

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5834
Author
Meek, Philippe
Simard, Patrick
Date
May 2007
Edition
40487
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Meek, Philippe
Simard, Patrick
Date
May 2007
Edition
40487
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Thinning
Skidding
Skidders
Productivity
Optimization
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 1, No. 12
Language
English
Abstract
Because of the low volume of wood that are harvested in commercial thinning operations, costs must be decreased to improve the economics of the operation. One approach would be to increase extraction distances, thereby decreasing road construction costs. In the present study, the optimal extraction distance ranged from 100 to 250 m for cable skidders and from 250 to 550 m for shortwood forwarders. The optimal distance increases with increasing road construction costs.
Optimization
Extraction distance
Forwarding distance
Skidding distance
Productivity
Choker skidders
Forwarders
Commercial thinning
Documents
Less detail

Preventing soil damage during harvesting operations, a guide for field supervisors

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1004
Date
January 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Date
January 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Systems
Harvesting
Machine operation
Machine operators
Logging
Soil disturbance
Canada
Soft soil
Language
English
Abstract
If not done properly performed, harvest operations can damage forest soils by compaction, rutting, erosion and nutrient loss. Forest harvesting equipment moving across a cutblock may directly or indirectly impact water quality and future tree growth. To maintain soil health during harvesting, field supervisors must know when there is a risk of damage, and understand how equipment operations affect the soil. This guide was created to provide practical advice for field supervisors to minimize soil and site damage during harvesting operations.
Documents
Less detail

Tests for commercial production for borate-treated glulam

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5609
Author
Feng, Martin
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
April 2007
Edition
37822
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Feng, Martin
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
April 2007
Edition
37822
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
22 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Prevention
Preservatives boron
Preservatives
Preservation
Laminate product
Beams
Series Number
Value to Wood no. FCC 82i
5413
W-2399
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This project was to complete the link from research to commercial production of borate-treated glulam, a value-added new product with appealing performance characteristics in the areas of fire-resistance, mold, insects and decay. The objectives of this project were to eliminate the impediments to commercial production that were identified in a previous project, and provide needed information on strength characteristics of borate-treated lumber compared to untreated lumber.
Laminated products - Preservation
Preservatives - Boron
Beams - Laminated - Preservation
Moulds - Prevention
Documents
Less detail

User innovation and modification of wood-based construction materials

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5612
Author
Fell, David
Tokarczyk, J.
Hansen, E.
Date
September 2007
Edition
37843
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Tokarczyk, J.
Hansen, E.
Date
September 2007
Edition
37843
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
43 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Systems
Series Number
5407
W-2444
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This project embarked on a new philosophy of information and knowledge collection. This was to mine the frustrations, solutions, and experiences of building products users. As clear methodology for this type of research was not readily available, much of the early efforts in the project involved working with different survey methodologies with a small group of builders and code officials. What we learned is that occurrences of innovations were too few to collect via field surveys. However, traditional paper surveys are not good at fostering reflection and creativity which were important to the study. In the end, the methodology employed was a paper survey with heavy reliance on visual clues such as diagrams of common building systems. This allowed respondents to visualize problems and solutions and to sketch to explain their ideas. Another modification to this project was the addition of building inspectors to the survey population. This was beneficial as inspectors see several homes per day, whereas most builders build only a few homes per year. Data collection yielded a total of 37 usable completed surveys, including 19 building inspectors and 18 builders. All data was qualitative. Data was analyzed by building component and building system. Results provide information on:
which materials are used in each application,
the positives and negatives of materials by application,
material modifications for specific applications,
ideas for improving building systems. Few in-practice innovations were identified. However, there were many new or modified product ideas that were desired by respondents. Major themes included:
Finishing, cutting and fastening of finishing products
Optimization of traditional and engineered structural material sizes
Pre-insulated systems for energy efficiency
Improvements in panel markings
Reduction of wood use for cost and sustainability
Mixed materials
Fastener optimizations and improvements
Information systems
Documents
Less detail

Évaluation des décisions d'achats des détaillants de meubles au Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5700
Author
Lihra, T.
Graf, R.
Date
March 2007
Edition
39002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lihra, T.
Graf, R.
Contributor
PARIM
Date
March 2007
Edition
39002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Markets
Canada
Furniture
Series Number
E-4183
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
La croissance de la mondialisation des marchés et la libre circulation des produits et des services ont accru les pressions concurrentielles exercées sur les producteurs canadiens de meubles. L’objectif de la présente étude est d’améliorer la capacité des fabricants de meubles d'adapter la présentation de leurs produits de manière à répondre aux attentes des détaillants sur le plan de la valeur maximale perçue (c. à d. présenter le produit en fonction des facteurs déterminants qui influent sur les décisions d'achat des détaillants) et insister sur le fait que ces produits sont fabriqués au Canada. Une enquête a été réalisée auprès de 220 détaillants canadiens de meubles afin d’évaluer le Canada, les É.-U. et la Chine comme pays de ressource. Les résultats démontrent qu’un segment important de consommateur considère l’origine des meubles lors de l’achat, le Canada étant le pays d’origine favorisé. Par contre, la différence de performance du Canada par rapport aux É.-U. et la Chine est faible. Les attributs jugés plus importants par les détaillants sont l’exactitude dans la livraison, la qualité du fini, la constance de la qualité du produit et la livraison des commandes dans les délais prévus. Les forces des fabricants canadiens sont le design, la constance de la qualité du produit, un large éventail de finis, la facilité de retour de marchandises endommagées et la souplesse relativement aux quantités commandées. La faiblesse des fabricants canadiens est le prix de gros élevé des produits.
Furniture - Markets
Documents
Less detail

Effect of chemical pre-treatment of wood furnish on resin consumption and panel dimensional stability. Part IV. Chemical pre-treatment of beetle-killed lodgepole pine for fibreboard manufacturing

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5701
Author
Deng, James
Feng, Martin
Date
January 2007
Edition
39008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Deng, James
Feng, Martin
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
January 2007
Edition
39008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Utilization
Stability
Resin
Materials
Insect killed
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 43
4927
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Experimental work was carried out to investigate the effect of chemical pre-treatments and refining process conditions on the panel properties of high density fibreboard (HDF) using typical mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested lodgepole pine sawdust and shavings from a Western Canadian MDF mill as raw materials. The characterisation of the raw materials was conducted in terms of pH, acid buffer capacity, UF resin gel time, and peak temperature and reaction heat tested by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Three different combinations of chemical pre-treatment and refining process condition were studied. HDF panels were made from these three differently treated fibres with 20% urea-formaldehyde resin content on oven dry wood. The results of the experiment indicated that wood shavings and the wood sawdust present different acid buffer capacities. While the sawdust has the lowest acid buffer capacity and close to both the fresh lodgepole pine and 100% beetle-killed wood studied previously, the acid buffer capacity of the shavings was the highest. Both edge thickness swell and thickness swell of the HDF panels reduced with increasing fibre refining temperature. However, internal bond strength, MOR and MOE of the panels were reduced. The chemical pre-treatment of wood furnish using 0.5% hydrogen peroxide did not improve the dimensional stability of the panel.
Fibreboard
Stability
Resin
Composite materials - Manufacture
Insect-killed wood - Utilization
Documents
Less detail

Effect of chemical pre-treatment of wood furnish on resin consumption and panel dimensional stability. Part III. Chemical pre-treatment of wood strands for OSB manufacture

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5702
Author
Deng, James
Feng, Martin
Date
March 2007
Edition
39014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Deng, James
Feng, Martin
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2007
Edition
39014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Strandboards
Stability
Resin
Oriented strandboard
Orientation
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 43
4927
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Experimental work was carried out to investigate the effect of chemical pre-treatment of wood strands for the manufacture of OSB. The chemicals used for the pre-treatment included low molecular weight liquid PF, low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) and hydrogen peroxide. These chemicals were tested at two dosage levels. The untreated strands and chemically pre-treated strands were characterized for their pH, acid buffer capacity, base buffer capacity and PF resin gel time. Eighteen OSB panels were made with different chemically pre-treated wood strands and compared with the untreated OSB panels as a control using PF or MDI resins. A total of 27 OSB panels were made in this study. The results suggested that the moisture resistance and dimensional stability of the OSB made from chemically pre-treated wood strands were generally better than the control panels made from untreated wood strands and 3.5% PF resin (C1). However, no obvious improvement was made when comparing to the control OSB panels using untreated wood strands bonded with 7% PF resin (C2) or 3.5% MDI resin (C3). The three different chemicals studied performed differently. The low molecular weight liquid PF performed better than hydrogen peroxide, followed by the low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol). It was found that the wood pH and acid and base buffer capacities were changed after the chemical treatments. However, there was no obvious correlation between these changes and the corresponding PF gel times.
Oriented strandboard - Manufacture
Stability
Resin
Documents
Less detail

Impact of drying on flake degradation

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5703
Author
Sean, Trek
Cheng, L.
Date
February 2007
Edition
39018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Sean, Trek
Cheng, L.
Date
February 2007
Edition
39018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
22 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Strandboards
Oriented strandboard
Orientation
Drying
Series Number
General Revenue Report Project No. 4487
4487
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Strand drying is a necessary step in OSB production, as a means to reduce furnish moisture content to an acceptable level, which in part depends on the resin used. It has been mentioned that beside wood degradation which causes fines generation and fibre surface oxidation, other problems such as VOC emissions, excess energy consumption and variability in moisture content of strands may occur as a result of strand drying. This work involved the characterisation of strands from six commercial OSB mills. The methodology adopted in this study was to characterize strands collected before and after drying, as well as information on operation conditions in order to relate the effects of drying on the overall strand degradation. Strand quality was evaluated before and after drying in terms of the following characteristics:
Strand size distribution;
Strand surface oxidation;
Strand tensile strength. Results on classification of wet strands showed very large variability in width distribution ranging from very narrow to very wide. Results on size distribution of dry strands revealed that strand degradation characteristics appear dependent on individual mill strategy that can vary considerably from mill to mill. The study showed that conveyer dryers caused the least strand size reduction of the three dryer types included in the study. Triple and single pass dryers caused similar amounts of strand size reduction. Test results also showed that drying conditions e.g. drying temperature, drying time and final moisture content played a key role in strand size degradation. Overall strand size classification results showed no clear pattern suggesting that the drying process is not the only factor responsible for post-strander fines generation. Other factors such as strand damage incurred during strand manufacturing and mechanical damage during strand handling may also play substantial roles in the reduction of strand size observed in this study. The drying operation had little effect on tensile strength of the strands. However, measurement of strand surface contact angles revealed that surface oxidation is taking place during strand drying. For all strand samples, the contact angles measured on strands sampled before drying were lower than the contact angles measured after drying. The study clearly indicated that thermal degradation is not related to dryer type but to other drying conditions, namely the combination of temperature and residence time. Thus it is possible that strands dried for a relatively long time at lower temperatures can incur more surface oxidation that strands dried at higher temperatures, but for a much shorter time.
Drying
Oriented strandboard - Manufacture
Documents
Less detail

Développement d'un standard de couleurs pour l'industrie du meuble

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5704
Author
Rancourt, V.
Troshani, Z.
Date
March 2007
Edition
39050
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Troshani, Z.
Contributor
PARIM
Date
March 2007
Edition
39050
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
72 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Specifications
Furniture
Specification
Series Number
E-4264
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Ce document est un rapport préliminaire résumant l’avancement de la première année du projet Développement d’un standard de couleurs pour l’industrie du meuble. Des lectures de colorimétrie ont été prises chez cinq fabricants de composants et de meubles en bois afin d’évaluer les pratiques actuelles d’appariement des baguettes lors de la conception de panneaux. Les résultats sont présentés pour l’ensemble des usines, tout participants confondus et une annexe disponible seulement pour les participants et confidentielle à chacun, présente les données obtenues respectivement pour chacun des participants.
Furniture - Manufacture
Colour
Specifications
Documents
Less detail

Multi-channel analysis of the furniture buying process

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5710
Author
Lihra, T.
Graf, R.
Date
March 2007
Edition
39101
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lihra, T.
Graf, R.
Contributor
PARIM
Date
March 2007
Edition
39101
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
29 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Furniture
Series Number
Projet General Revenue Report No. 5346
5346
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Furniture is among the important personal consumption expenditures for durable goods in the USA. Retailers and manufacturers offer different communication channels to assist consumers all through the process of acquiring furniture. The objective of the presents study was to evaluate US consumers channel use at different steps of the residential furniture buying process. An Internet consumer survey was conducted using a socio demographic representative sample of the US citizens. Results showed that the furniture retail store is the most important communication channel at each of the five considered buying process stages. Overall score of that channel was higher for females than males indicating that women care more about communication when buying furniture. Internet was not of significant importance when buying furniture. The importance of touching the product indicates that consumers are presently not ready for virtual furniture shopping. Advertising was perceived as a significant means to gather information. In regard to the ranking of communication channels, no significant difference was observed between geographic regions, gender, and age and income groups.
Furniture
Documents
Less detail

285 records – page 1 of 29.