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37 records – page 1 of 4.

Accelerated aging and outdoor weathering of aspen waferboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4743
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Alberta
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Waferboards
Utilization
Aspen
Aging
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 1
E-1235
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Waferboard
Aspen - Utilization
Waferboard - Aging
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Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
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Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
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Biomass productivity of white spruce in Alberta and Manitoba

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5480
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37101
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37101
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Picea
Growth
Biomass
Alberta
Series Number
CFS No. 27
Contract No. 02-80-56-011
W-319
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Picea glauca - Growth
Biomass - Alberta
Biomass - Manitoba
Dendrochronology
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Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
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Builders' risk insurance and wood-frame construction in Alberta

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4557
Author
O'Connor, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
41350
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
O'Connor, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
41350
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Alberta
British Columbia
Costs
Building construction
Series Number
W-2317
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Builders’ risk insurance (also known as course of construction insurance) is the insurance that a builder buys to protect himself in the event of a loss on a building during construction. This project examines the scope and possible causes of recent increases in builders’ risk insurance in Alberta, with a particular focus on insurance premiums specific to wood construction. In addition, the project explores the potential for tools or information, targeted to builders or to insurance brokers, that could lower builders’ insurance costs. Although insurance represents only a small portion of total construction costs, significant increases recently in builders’ risk premiums in Alberta have attracted attention and have placed added pressure on Alberta builders with respect to their competitiveness. Increases in builders’ risk premiums could represent a threat to the market for wood products if builders turn to non-combustible alternatives in order to save insurance costs. Furthermore, market development activities for wood in the non-residential construction sector will be hindered as increased builders’ risk costs represent a barrier to entry.
Alberta Alliance Project No. 5130-06 pertaining to Building construction - Cost; Business management
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Characteristics of Alberta's commercial tree species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub985
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1995
Edition
37360
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Contributor
Alberta Research Council
Date
March 1995
Edition
37360
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Alberta
British Columbia
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus banksiana
Pinus
Picea
Black spruce
Betula
Balsam
Aspen
Fir
Series Number
W-1150
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This publication characterizes nine commercial tree species of Alberta. Included are descriptions of the range and volume of each species, their wood properties, and present and potential manufacturing uses.
Populus balsamifera
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Abies balsamea
Abies lasiocarpa
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl var. latifolia
Picea mariana
Picea glauca
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Chip production at four size categories of Alberta sawmills : an assessment of production volumes and cost

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub745
Author
Mayer, D.A.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37058
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Mayer, D.A.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37058
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Waste utilization
Utilization
Studs
Saw mills
Recovery
Costs
Alberta
Series Number
W-268
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Chips - Recovery - Alberta
Chipping - Cost - Alberta
Waste - Utilization for pulp - Alberta
Sawmilling studies - Alberta
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Developing kiln drying schedules for the Alberta wood industry

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37757
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Contributor
Alberta Department of Economic Development and Tourism
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Drying
Kilns
Alberta
Series Number
W-2192
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This project was initiated to provide technical assistance to the Alberta wood drying industry. The specific objective was to identify opportunities to improve product quality through modification of the drying schedules. Seven mills representing almost 50% of the solid, softwood lumber production in the province were selected for the project. All mills provided a great deal of cooperation and commitment to the project was excellent. In general, lumber drying operations in Alberta are in good physical condition and operating personnel have a sound knowledge of basic drying concepts. In general, drying schedules were found to be quite harsh. the specific concerns at most mills related to too rapid a heat-up rate and extremely low relative humidity at the end of the drying cycle. Most of the schedule modification called for more gradual and controlled heat-up rates with higher wet-bulb temperatures. The objective of this modification is to avoid setting up conditions othat promote variability in moisture content from board to board. Higher relative humidity is required at the end of the drying cycle to avoid over-drying faster drying boards. Achieving a reduction in final moisture content variability and a higher overall average moisture content should be the objective of drying schedule modifications. Mill visits were used not only to review drying schedules but also to conduct a brief inspection of drying practices and equipment. It would be unproductive to identify schedule modifications if there were obvious shortcomings in other areas of the operation that would make it difficult to implement or over-shadow the effect. The primary concern with drying equipment is the leakiness of the structures. A common recommendation to mills was to tighten up kiln doors and walls in order to retain more moisture in the kiln environment. Another area of concern was related to lumber handling operations. Most problems in this area could be addressed through educating and training staff working at stackers, handling material in the yard, or preparing loads for the kiln. Logging and log storage practices at all of the mills visited has a serious and detrimental impact on the drying operations. At most times of the year, operators are having to deal with a wood supply that has a mix of initial moisture content conditions. Most mills seem to manage the small percentage of balsam fir in their mix effectively. Some future gains may be achieved through refined presorting techniques that take into account initial MC variability as well as differing drying characteristics between species.
Kiln drying
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37 records – page 1 of 4.