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122 records – page 1 of 13.

Accelerated aging and outdoor weathering of aspen waferboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4743
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Alberta
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Waferboards
Utilization
Aspen
Aging
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 1
E-1235
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Waferboard
Aspen - Utilization
Waferboard - Aging
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Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Analysis of Alberta’s pavement capacity to support winter weight premiums

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49858
Author
Thiam, Papa-Masseck
Bradley, Allan
Date
May 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Thiam, Papa-Masseck
Bradley, Allan
Date
May 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
57 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Roads
Transport
Trucks
Weight
Alberta
Temperature
FOP Technical Report
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2018 n.28
Language
English
Abstract
FPInnovations, in cooperation with Alberta Transportation and the Laval University i3C Chair, undertook a review of the starting threshold for initiating winter weight hauling in Alberta. The objective of this project was to conduct an engineering analysis of freezing pavements to determine the minimum frost depth at which log hauling at winter weight premiums (WWP) in Alberta could start without compromising pavement service life. The report describes literature on freezing pavement engineering, Canadian winter weight policies, a controlled trafficking simulation of an instrumented pavement as it was frozen, and subsequent modeling to valiidate results and extrapolate results ot a wider range of pavement structures. It was recommended that the current 1.0 m starting frost depth threshold be reduced to a depth of 700 mm.
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Aspen logging debris management techniques

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub525
Author
Bulley, Brian
Date
1999
Edition
36765
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bulley, Brian
Date
1999
Edition
36765
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Treatment
Slash treatment
Slash
Roads
Residues
Processing
Logs
Aspen
Alberta
Series Number
Technical Note ; TN-000283
Language
English
Abstract
In 1997, FERIC, Alberta Research Council (ARC), Ainsworth Lumber Inc., and Daishowa-Marubeni International Ltd. conducted a study to determine the productivities and costs of various methods of managing logging debris in aspen cutblocks. Conventional roadside processing, two in-block processing treatments (intermediate skid and at-the-stump processing), and roadside processing with subsequent dispersal of slash into the block were assessed.
Logging residues
Residue management
Roadside processing
Slash treatment
Aspen
Alberta
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Assessing the need for footwear with protective toecaps for wildland fire operations in Alberta

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3874
Author
Ault, Ray
Date
2002
Edition
40595
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Ault, Ray
Date
2002
Edition
40595
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Wildfire Operations
Subject
Wildfires
Safety
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 36
Language
English
Abstract
This study identified footwear appropriate for Alberta wildland firefighters and assessed the need for protective toecaps on their footwear. Hazard and risk of foot injuries were assessed, and recommendations are made.
Fire fighters
Wildfires
Safety
Footwear
Boots
Protective toecaps
Alberta
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At-the-stump and roadside log processing in Alberta: a comparison

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43999
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
1994
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
1994
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Chips
Stumps
Alberta
Wood
Utilization
Systems
Satellite
Roads
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Productivity
Harvesting
Costs
British Columbia
Series Number
FO Special Report ; SR 96
Language
English
Abstract
Harvesting systems
Roadside harvesting
Cut-to-length harvesting systems
Undersized stems
UTILIZATION
Wood chips
Chip quality
Satellite chipping
PRODUCTIVITY
COSTS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
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Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
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Biomass productivity of white spruce in Alberta and Manitoba

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5480
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37101
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37101
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Picea
Growth
Biomass
Alberta
Series Number
CFS No. 27
Contract No. 02-80-56-011
W-319
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Picea glauca - Growth
Biomass - Alberta
Biomass - Manitoba
Dendrochronology
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Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
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122 records – page 1 of 13.