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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Characterization of fires in residential buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2614
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2009
Edition
39208
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2009
Edition
39208
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Fire
Building construction
Residential construction
Series Number
General Revenue
4918
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Fires, Building - Tests
Documents
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Characterization of fires in residential buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2510
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2008
Edition
39095
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2008
Edition
39095
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Fire
Building construction
Residential construction
Series Number
General Revenue Report Project No. 4918
4918
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Fires, Building
Documents
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Development of an improved method for analysis of panels with low formaldehyde emission

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39223
Author
Dechamplain, F.
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Dechamplain, F.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pollution
Panels
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 20
5763
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In April 2008, the State of California adopted an airborne toxic control measure (ATCM) to reduce formaldehyde emissions from composite wood products, proposed by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), part of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Phase 1 started in January 2009, and at the end of the implementation, in July 2012, formaldehyde emission limits will range between 0.05 and 0.13 ppm, depending on the type of products, based on the ASTM E 1333 Large Chamber Method. These new limits are in the order of the limits of detection of the current analytical methods presently used, and rendered the chromotropic acid reaction, on which the ASTM E 1333 is based, with a limit of detection of 0.01 ppm less precise. An alternative method to determine formaldehyde concentration in air has been developed to be used as part of the ASTM E1333 Large Chamber Method. 60 L of air are sampled through an impinger containing an acetylacetone-ammonia solution. The solution is then heated, and analyzed by fluorimetry using a Turner Quantech filter fluorometer equipped with a NB430 excitation filter and a SC500 emission filter. The test method is inexpensive, easy to use, compatible with the Large Chamber, Perforator and Desiccator Methods, and is very sensitive. The minimum detection limit (MDL) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) of this analytical method are 0.0004 and 0.0013 ppm, respectively.
Air pollution
Formaldehyde
Panels
Documents
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Effectiveness of barriers to minimize VOC emissions, including formaldehyde

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37914
Author
Barry, A.
Date
April 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Barry, A.
Date
April 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Toxicity
Pollution control
Pollution
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
RDS 08-06
W-2581
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In this study, various finishing materials used by primary and secondary particleboard and medium-density fibreboard (MDF) manufacturers were subjected to emissions testing in order to determine the most efficient barriers to eliminate (or at least reduce) formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from MDF and particleboard products.
Air pollution - Control
Formaldehyde - Toxicity
Documents
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Impact of Kyoto protocol on composite panel industries

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39104
Author
Barry, A.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Barry, A.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
73 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Regulations
Pollution
Canada
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 15
4005
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
One can summarize the work conducted under the Kyoto protocol by extracting some paragraphs from the Montreal climate conference press release. Under the Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force 16 February 2005, more than 30 industrialized countries are bound by specific and legally binding emission reduction targets. As a first step, these cover the period 2008-2012. The Kyoto Protocol is now fully operational. The adoption of the Marrakesh accords formally launches emissions trading and the other two mechanisms under the Kyoto Protocol. Carbon has now a market value. Under the clean development mechanism, investing in projects that provide sustainable development and reduce emissions makes sound business sense. The Joint Implementation (JI) adopted by the parties is one of the mechanisms which allow developed countries to invest in other developed countries and thereby earn carbon allowances which they can use to meet their emission reduction commitments. In addition to this, the clean development mechanism allows industrialized countries to invest in sustainable development projects in developing countries and thereby earn carbon allowances. “With these decisions in place, we now have the infrastructure to move ahead with the implementation of the Kyoto protocol” said Richard Kinley, head of the United Nations Climate Change conference. It sets solid basis for future steps to bring emissions down he added. All Kyoto Protocol Parties, including Canada, are now moving ahead to meet their GHG emission reduction commitments. In the past few years, Canada has developed and set strategies to meet our commitments. However, Canada has since changed for a new conservative government and a new strategy has been published first in April and the proposed greenhouse gas regulations are expected to be published in the Canada Gazette later this year, and the regulations finalized in 2009 to come into force as planned on January 1, 2010 according to the minister. During this fiscal year two Canadian provinces took important steps in regards to climate change by adopting regulations to reduce their respective GHG emissions. The province of BC has published its own green house gas reduction targets through the Bill 44 in which the province has set reduction targets by 2020 for 33% and 80% by 2050 relative to 2007 emissions levels for both. In 2007 the Quebec government announced the first carbon tax in Canada to Oil companies to pay a new energy tax of 0.8 cents a litre for gasoline distributed in the province and 0.938 cents for diesel fuel. The province has also adopted California’s greenhouse gas standards for new light-duty vehicles.
Composites
Air pollution - Canada - Laws and regulations
Carbon
Documents
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Investigation of combination formaldehyde scavengers for particleboard and MDF

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39219
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Particle boards
MDF
Air pollution
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 41
6293
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Scavengers
Documents
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Kyoto protocol impact on wood products industry

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39221
Author
Barry, A.
Date
July 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Barry, A.
Date
July 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
9 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pollution
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 15
4005
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Air pollution
Documents
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Review of technologies to lower formaldehyde emissions from composite wood panels

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5628
Author
Feng, Martin
He, G.
Date
June 2009
Edition
37963
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Feng, Martin
He, G.
Date
June 2009
Edition
37963
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Toxicity
Pollution
Gluing
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
General Revenue Report Project No. 5726
W-2674
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report examines various aspects of the formaldehyde emission issue facing the wood composite panel industry in order to help Forintek member companies best navigate this extremely important but increasingly complex problem. It is a state-of-the-art review of fundamentals associated with the formaldehyde emission problem, various standards and regulations, and known technologies for the reduction of formaldehyde emissions. It has distilled and concentrated a vast amount of information based on the literature review, international conferences, known industrial practices and experiences of the authors. Due to its hydrolytic instability, urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesive is the main source of formaldehyde emissions from UF-bonded particleboard, medium density fiberboard (MDF), high density fiberboard (HDF) and hardwood plywood through out their service life. There are various technologies available to reduce formaldehyde emission. These are: 1. Chemical modifications of UF resin (lower formaldehyde/urea (F/U) molar ratios, improved resin synthesis procedures, condensed with small amounts of melamine, use of formaldehyde scavengers, use of catalysts/hardeners, cross-linked with methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) or various combinations of these); 2. Panel post-treatments (anhydrous ammonia treatment, panel overlay, coating, etc.); 3. Manipulation of production process conditions; 4. Using alternative adhesives to replace UF resin; 5. Making binderless panel products. Some of these technologies can meet the challenges of the most stringent regulations, but likely at higher cost or lower productivity. The most promising options are using commercially available alternative wood adhesives (phenol-formaldehyde (PF), MDI, melamine-formaldehyde (MF), polyvinyl acetate (PVA) or soy) to replace UF. Depending on end use and target market, using ultra-low formaldehyde emitting UF or urea-melamine-formaldehyde/melamine-urea-formaldehyde (UMF/MUF) in combination with an effective catalyst/hardener and/or formaldehyde scavenger can also be a practical option.
Air pollution - Sources - Gluing
Formaldehyde Emissions - Control
Formaldehyde - Toxicity
Documents
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Using urea to reduce formaldehyde, acrolein and VOC emissions from OSB pressing.

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5620
Author
Feng, Martin
Date
January 2008
Edition
37870
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Feng, Martin
Date
January 2008
Edition
37870
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
7 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pollution
Materials
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
W-2497
Language
English
Abstract
This research work involved the production of aspen OSB panels in a pilot plant using three types of commercial adhesive systems respectively as a wood binder (PF, PF/MDI and MDI). It was demonstrated that spraying urea aqueous solution to dry wood strands at 0.2% and 0.5% urea loading rates (urea solids on a dry wood weight basis) can effectively reduce the emissions of formaldehyde, acrolein and some other volatile organic compounds from OSB pressing without adversely affecting the board properties regardless which type of adhesive is used. The side-effect of the urea addition was the dramatic increase of press emission of nitrogen compounds, most likely due to the slow decomposition of urea to ammonia at high press temperatures. This approach may also be effectively and economically applied to lowering formaldehyde, acrolein and VOC emissions from OSB dryer and the side-effect of increased nitrogen compounds emission could be less due to lower wood temperatures inside the OSB dryer than those inside the OSB press. It was also demonstrated that using MDI adhesive to partially or completely replace PF adhesive can lower formaldehyde, phenol and total VOC emissions from OSB pressing. Under the test conditions of this work and without urea addition, the MDI-bonded aspen OSB panels emitted about 87% less formaldehyde, 80% less phenol and 25% less water-soluble VOC than the PF-bonded aspen OSB panels. The PF/MDI-bonded aspen OSB panels emitted about 61% less formaldehyde, 41% less phenol and 11% less water-soluble VOC than the same PF-bonded panels. However, the MDI-bonded panels produced 65% higher water-insoluble VOC than that of the PF-bonded panels although the water-insoluble VOC accounted for less than 3% of the total VOC emitted from the MDI-bonded panels.
Composite materials - Manufacture
Formaldehyde
Air pollution
Air pollution - Sources
Documents
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9 records – page 1 of 1.