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24 month evaluation of novel UV protection systems. Second Year Report 2004/05

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4530
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Date
March 2005
Edition
41317
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2005
Edition
41317
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 35;3226
W-2134
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A transparent coating with long-term performance could help wood maintain its share of residential markets against material substitution and potentially expand markets in recreational property and non-residential buildings. While transparent coatings can be made reasonably resistant to UV some UV likely penetrates to the wood and by necessity clear coatings are transparent to visible light. Visible light can also cause damage over the long term thus the underlying wood needs additional protection. Four novel UV protection systems were tested as pre-treatments on uncoated wood and under three coatings, a water-based film forming coating, a water-based acrylic varnish and a solvent based water repellent. Samples were exposed to natural weathering facing South at 45° at a test site in Gulfport, Mississippi, in collaboration with the USDA Forest Products Laboratory. The test material was inspected every six months for discolouration, mold and stain, coating water repellency, flaking, erosion and cracking and substrate condition. After 24 months exposure, coatings over the combination of UV absorber and lignin stabilizer identified by Stephen Ayer were performing better than the same coatings applied over the combination recommended by Ciba and coatings over both pre-treatments were performing substantially better than controls with no pre-treatment. Projection of fitted curves beyond the data appears to indicate that pretreatment may double the life expectancy of the coating. There was no consistent effect of the synergists on either combination at this time.
Preservatives - Tests
Finishes - Exterior - Tests
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Aboutage à entures multiples : qualité des produits

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42377
Author
Mohammad, M.
Date
May 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mohammad, M.
Contributor
Canada. Ressources naturelles
Date
May 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
69 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Specifications
Joints
Specification
Design
Series Number
Valeur au bois no FCC 3
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Ce rapport décrit les résultats d’études en cours ou antérieures réalisées par Forintek sur les méthodes utilisées pour l’aboutage du bois et la qualité des produits. Il donne une description détaillée des différents paramètres susceptibles d’affecter le procédé d’aboutage et la qualité du produit fini. Il contient également une masse de renseignements publiés dans le cadre d’ateliers, de conférences ou de revues techniques. Cette information a été regroupée et intégrée dans un format simplifié de façon à être utilisable dans la fabrication des bois aboutés. L’un des chapitres porte sur le processus de qualification et de contrôle de la qualité des bois de charpente aboutés et décrit les normes canadiennes de produits spéciaux applicables. On trouvera à la fin de chaque section un paragraphe traitant d’idées de recherche novatrices, de questions importantes pour l’industrie canadienne du bois abouté et de lacunes dans les connaissances.
Joints and fastenings - Design
Joints and fastenings - Specifications
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Acoustic performance of wood-frame buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42306
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
44 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Acoustic
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 3
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Commercial and multi-family residential construction represents a growth area for the Canadian wood products industry. To capitalize on this opportunity, a thorough understanding of the necessary products and system attributes will be essential. Adequate levels of noise/sound control in multi-family buildings are mandatory requirements of building codes in Canada, the United States, Europe, and most developed Asian countries. In many jurisdictions, these requirements are as strictly enforced as those for structural sufficiency and fire safety. Much effort has been spent on evaluation of sound transmission class (STC) and impact sound insulation class (IIC) of floor and wall assemblies and on studies of flanking transmission in multi-family dwellings in Canada. However, continuing occupant complaints of poor acoustic performance in wood-frame buildings that appear to have been built according to wall and floor construction practices recommended in building codes suggest the existence of gaps in current noise control techniques. Forintek initiated this project to investigate the relative importance of noise transmission in wood-frame residential buildings in comparison with other building serviceability issues, and to conduct a pilot study to examine construction designs of wood-frame buildings that exhibit unsatisfactory and satisfactory noise control and to identify existing gaps in current noise control techniques. A literature review and survey of 123 occupants of wood-framed multi- and single-family residential buildings was conducted to determine the relative importance of noise transmission in comparison with other building serviceability attributes. Case studies were conducted on construction details and designs of six new wood-frame condominiums and one single family-house that were built according to code requirements and recommendations for controlling noise transmission. We found that the general public had high expectations regarding adequate acoustic privacy. Even single- family house builders considered low sound transmission important. The multi-family building occupants ranked “sound insulation” the most “important” serviceability attribute, while single-family occupants were most concerned with “water penetration and condensation”. The lowest level of “satisfaction” was given by all respondents to “noise transmission” for their current residences, including single-family occupants, who had ranked it as not being so “important”. The case studies revealed that, current construction practices were much more effective in controlling airborne sound transmission than impact noise. The footfall noise transmission from stairs through the walls is still an unresolved issue that is not considered in the current Canadian Building Code. The low frequency footfall noise transmission between vertically-stacked units was the common complaint in some of these buildings. With no requirement for impact sound insulation in the current National Building Code of Canada, and with our existing knowledge gap concerning low frequency footfall noise transmission problems and solutions to control them, builders, acoustics consultants and design engineers have simply tended to blame wood building materials for noise-related complaints. We concluded that if we are to satisfy the occupants of both single-and multi-family wood-frame buildings and to provide confidence for builders and design engineers in wood-frame construction with satisfactory acoustic performance, a much greater effort is needed to improve sound insulation including development of better sound insulated wood-frame systems and building materials as well as retrofitting techniques. Acoustic performance will be a critical factor for the wood products industry in gaining a greater share of the multi-family construction market and in competing with other building materials.
Acoustic emissions
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Analyse comparative des différents types de scanneurs d'équarris

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5403
Author
Bédard, P.
Fournier, Francis
Date
February 2005
Edition
42282
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Bédard, P.
Fournier, Francis
Date
February 2005
Edition
42282
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Trimming
Scanners
Optimization
Series Number
General Revenue 4497
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
On retrouve actuellement en milieu industriel diverses technologies de scanneurs d’équarris utilisant des configurations soit linéaires ou transversales pour l’optimiser le débitage secondaire. Puisque aucune donnée n’est disponible quant à la performance ou les avantages d’un système par rapport à un autre, Forintek a entrepris de réaliser une étude comparative. Un échantillon d’équarris a été mesuré dans des conditions industrielles avec trois scanneurs différents, un transversal et deux linéaires, ainsi qu’en laboratoire à l’aide de la technologie de rayon x, servant de référence. La comparaison des rendements obtenus avec chaque scanneur étudié a été réalisée par le biais de simulations à l’aide du logiciel Optitek. Comme la plupart des systèmes de positionnement d’équarris présentent un niveau de précision limité, des erreurs de positionnement ont été appliquées par simulation pour obtenir des résultats réalistes. Les résultats ont démontré que les erreurs de positionnement ont un impact majeur sur l’optimisation du débitage secondaire. Avec le niveau d’erreur moyen observé en industrie, aucune technologie de scanneur ne se démarque nettement des autres. Toutefois, en améliorant considérablement la précision des systèmes de positionnement, on pourrait observer la tendance suivante : le scanneur transversal s’avèrerait le plus précis avec un niveau d’efficacité de 2 % supérieur au système linéaire à 4 caméras, et ce dernier serait de 2 % supérieur au système linéaire à 2 caméras. La technologie du rayon x offrirait un excellent potentiel d’amélioration par rapport aux technologies actuelles puisqu’elle permettrait d’accroître l’efficacité du débitage de 6 % en ne considérant aucune erreur de positionnement.
Scanners
Breakdown, secondary
Trimming
Edging
Optimization
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Analyse comparative des équipements MSR

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2814
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Bédard, P.
Date
May 2005
Edition
39444
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Bédard, P.
Date
May 2005
Edition
39444
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Stresses
Saw mills
Equipment
Grading
Series Number
Projet General Revenue No 3242
E-4797
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Cette étude compare les performances des différentes machines de classement MSR utilisées actuellement dans l’industrie canadienne du bois de sciage. Cinq machines ont été retenues : La HCLT-7200 de Metriguard, la Dart de Eldeco, la TMG du CRIQ, la Dynagrade de Dynalyse AB et la XLG de Coe Mfg.
Lumber manufacturing
Sawmills - Equipment
Grading - Lumber - Stress, Mechanical
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An analysis of the North American home siding market

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1257
Author
Tabarsi, E.
Date
May 2004
Edition
37714
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Tabarsi, E.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
May 2004
Edition
37714
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
76 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
United States (USA)
Siding
Canada
Markets
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 34;3918
W-2089
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
In this study builders and professional repair and remodellers were given a chance to evaluate 12 of the most common home siding products available in the market today. The products were evaluated on seven different attributes: price, maintenance, installation, attractiveness, status/image, fire resistance, and durability. Overall, fire resistance, attractiveness, and maintenance were selected as the most important product attributes by single-family homebuilders and repair & remodellers. The majority of respondents stated that their customers had a strong influence on their final choice of siding materials. In addition respondents were asked for their opinion regarding product popularity, rate of installation, substitution trends, and their choice of siding products for different categories of homes.
Siding
Markets - North America
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An evaluation of the detection capacity of automated defect detection systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42284
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
July 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
July 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
85 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Lumber
Value added
Manufacturing
Series Number
General Revenue
E-3923
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The market for hardwood component production is currently affected by low-cost components importation from Asia. Industrial automation is an actual option for the secondary manufacturing industry to counter this situation. Integrating a defect detection system is a complex process and selecting the right system is even more complicated. This study proposes an approach for assessing the defect detection capabilities of different systems as well as a decision support tool to guide the producer toward the adequate equipment. The study is limited to assessing defect detection capacities; the overall system performance, the optimization software and the cutting equipment are not analyzed. Understanding the origin and characteristics of defects to be detected and the capacities and theoretical limits of vision technology are prerequisites. A sampling with defects that, due to properties such as their small size, are hard to detect, is assessed by each system and the results are compared. To date, the assessed systems are not capable of detecting all defects pertaining to hardwood component production. A decision support tool will make it possible to methodically select the equipment most appropriate to the producer’s needs and leads to an enlightened decision in terms of the producer’s priorities and expectations.
Defects - Detection
Lumber
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An evaluation of the detection capacity of automated defect detection systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42349
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Scanning
Series Number
Technology Profile ; TP-04-05E
E-4005
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Using automation to maximise yield from increasingly rare and costly raw materials is a solution that can help secondary wood producers improve their profitability. By integrating an automated defect detection system, lumber producers can potentially increase production output and grade recovery, helping them to strengthen their strategic business advantage. To develop a reference tool to assist in the choice of an appropriate defect detection system, Forintek conducted a detection capacity evaluation of commercially available equipment. Nineteen (19) manufacturers who work in the area of defect detection in lumber were contacted; of these, four agreed to participate in the study. The project objectives were based on requests from the producers: the evaluation focussed on the detection capacity of specific defects and not on the performance of the overall system. Defects were identified and an experimental evaluation was conducted to determine if the equipment recognised the defects or not. A decision tool based on a multi-criteria analysis has been proposed in the completed project report, to help producers identify the most appropriate defect detection system. However, no evaluation can be offered for the overall performance of the systems assessed, as production needs differ from producer to producer.
Defects - Detection
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An investigation into data communications standards for total process control. Final Report 2004/05

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37722
Author
Niessen, R.
Date
April 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Niessen, R.
Date
April 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Process control
Automatic control
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 3274;3274
W-2145
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Today's machine centres are being increasingly automated but often operate as a collection of isolated machines run by a variety of computer systems. Clearly, such heterogeneous computing and control environments present a formidable barrier to the problem of interoperability. Already there are vendors that provide a partial solution to the problem, since they provide methods of interoperability only between machines that they supply. Vendor-specific methodologies are in general proprietary, and do not inter-operate with any other vendor's equipment. What's needed to facilitate widespread machine-to-machine data exchange is a universal methodology to connect to optimizer data, or any data for that matter, with plug-and-play simplicity. In order to enable enhanced data availability and also to lay the foundations for the evolution of process monitoring and control in the sawmilling industry, this project was undertaken to create a common methodology for vendor-neutral data exchange between machine centres, process monitoring and control systems, and business systems. A task forceª, with members drawn from sawmilling and equipment vendor companies, selected the well-established specifications for data exchange published by the OPC Foundation, a consortium of companies committed to universal data exchange in industry. While these specifications specify standards-based methods for data exchange, the task force recognized that there was an additional layer required to create standard plug-and-play access to sawmill optimizers. This additional standardization layer specifies exactly what data is made available per optimizer type. After testing these ideas for primary breakdown optimizers and PLCs in a sawmill-based pilot project, the task force unanimously adopted the OPC specification and our per-optimizer layer as a practical standard for data exchange in the sawmilling industry. Given this initial success, however, there needs to be a continuing effort to ensure that the evolving sawmill standards eventually are applied to all optimizer types, and that sawmill managers and executives are aware of their benefits. Continuing effort must ensure that multi-vendor support per optimizer type does not result in tag list fragmentation which would undermine the benefits of standards. The methodologies adopted during this project will never become standard in the sawmilling industry unless the majority of sawmillers demand the standard OPC optimizer interfaces defined by this project. ª In this document, “task force” is used interchangeably with “working group”. On 21 March 2002, a standards committee was struck from task force members, but soon lost its meaning when the task force adopted an email list approach to collaboration. The email list was much more inclusive and therefore much larger, and became the defacto “working group”. By project end, the working group consisted of 40 members.
Process control - Automation
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Application of fire models in building construction, 2004

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5368
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2004
Edition
42245
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2004
Edition
42245
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 8
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
This report summarises progress in the second year of this project. Significant progress has been made towards achieving the original objectives of the project. In addition, several other applications of fire models have been identified that would further the interests of the Canadian wood industry and so appropriate research was initiated. An objective of this project was to identify wood-stud walls that qualify as being of fireproof construction in Japan. To be classified as fireproof construction, a wood-stud wall must pass the 1 + 3 test in which it is subjected to a one hour fire-resistance test and then must support its load for another 3 hours as the furnace cools. Attempts were made to revise WALL2D to model the response of walls during the heating and cooling phases of an arbitrary fire. The revised model was to be used to model the response of walls in the 1 + 3 test and in furnished house fire tests run in Kemano. However, it turned out to be a major revision to include a cooling phase in WALL2D, but revisions were made to model a heating phase of an arbitrary fire. This was sufficient to get good agreement with temperatures measured within walls in Kemano. Revision of WALL2D to model the 1 + 3 test has been deferred until 2004-2005. The Japan 2 x 4 Home Builders Association and the Council of Forest Industries have identified, by testing, wood-stud walls and wood-joist floors that pass the 1 + 3 test. These assemblies have been granted Ministerial Approval as being of fireproof construction. It is therefore possible to build 4-storey wood-frame apartment buildings in high-density urban areas. Employing models to identify assemblies that pass the 1 + 3 test is now less urgent, but will continue as models may suggest ways to optimise assemblies meeting the 1 + 3 test. Another objective of this project was to undertake performance-based design of a building as a showcase study. Carleton University is developing a model to evaluate fire safety designs for 4-storey wood-frame commercial buildings. The first building to be analysed is a wood-frame version of the Carleton Technology Training Centre. The Carleton University model does not yet model the response of the structure of the building. To supplement Carleton University’s efforts, Forintek will undertake performance-based design for fire resistance of a wood-frame version of this building in 2004-2005. While the initial completion date for this project was to be March 2004, it was intended that if other applications of fire models were identified that would further the goals of the Canadian wood industry, the project would be extended. During 2003-2004, several new applications of fire models were initiated:
A fire resistance model developed jointly by Forintek the National Research Council Canada is being employed to estimate the impact on fire-resistance ratings of the load applied to wood-stud walls during a test. This information would be useful when quoting the fire-resistance ratings of Canadian assemblies in export markets where lower loads are applied during fire tests.
A collaborative venture has been initiated with Australian researchers to model fires in large compartments (found in non-residential buildings) and the resultant response of wood-frame walls.
Data generated in fire tests conducted in furnished houses in Kemano is being used to assess the ability of current fire models to predict fire development in these houses and to predict the performance of a variety of building assemblies. If the models do a good job, one would have increased confidence in applying fire models in a performance-based design environment.
To demonstrate the good fire performance of wood-frame assemblies, three fire tests were run for visiting Chinese fire experts. Fire models were used to design the experiments to ensure that wood-frame assemblies were selected that could withstand the fire exposures envisioned in the tests.
Fire resistance
Models
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233 records – page 1 of 24.