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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Application of flow simulation to the production of manufactured homes

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1410
Author
White, J.
Wong, Darrell
Jung, Brian W.
Houdek, D.
Davis, S.
Date
March 2008
Edition
37908
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
for ALBERTA ADVANCED EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY Alberta Forestry Research Institute 5th Floor, Phipps
Author
White, J.
Wong, Darrell
Jung, Brian W.
Houdek, D.
Davis, S.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2008
Edition
37908
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
35 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Digitalization
Subject
Prefabricated houses
Series Number
AFRI-6129
W-2575
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Manufacturing analysis using computer flow simulation has been applied successfully in pilot projects to several Alberta value-added wood products companies in the sectors of re-manufacturing and furniture manufacturing. This project continues these pilot projects examining the application and potential benefit in manufactured/prefab homes. An Alberta manufactured/prefab home manufacturer was selected for this project. The wall-line was chosen for this study. The study was accomplished through detailed observations and data collection, which identified several bottlenecks that included the framing table, squaring table and the linear configuration of the line. From observations, the squaring table was labour intensive and the material handling equipment was quite slow. At the framing table, the stud grade being used contained many twisted and bowed boards, which required additional time to align and fasten the studs. Lastly, the single-line configuration created bottlenecks during the transition from sheathed and unsheathed products. From observations and discussions with staff, potential improvement scenarios were developed. Simulation models were developed for each of these scenarios to evaluate their effectiveness and return on investment. The scenarios examined were: affect of panel sheathing ratio, improving efficiency at the squaring table, improving efficiency at the framing table, addition of a branch-line for unsheathed products and the addition of the branch-line in combination with increased efficiency at the framing table. The implementation of pre-cut OSB panels was simulated to reduce processing times at the squaring table by 30%, which increases throughput by 15%. The addition of a branch-line for unsheathed products showed a potential production increase of 10.8%. However, the simulation models also showed that the framing table could not maintain a consistent supply to the squaring table. The use of a higher stud grade was modelled showing a potential production improvement of 17.5%. As a result, the potential benefits in this particular wood products business demonstrates that computer flow simulations can be applied to Manufactured/Prefab Home manufacturers and may potentially have further implications in other similar Alberta value-added industries.
Prefabricated houses - Manufacture
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Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
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Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
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Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
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Increasing adhesive choices in engineered wood products that meet market requirements

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41381
Author
Pirvu, Ciprian
Date
March 1907
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Pirvu, Ciprian
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 1907
Material Type
Research report
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Materials
Adhesives
Series Number
W-2481
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Test results for three representative adhesives were obtained for use in the development of a proposed standard for limited moisture exposure (CSA O112.10). The adhesives tested were an emulsion polymer isocyanate (EPI), a polyurethane (PUR) and a melamine-urea formaldehyde with 40% melamine resin content (MUF40). Currently, EPI and PUR are used for I-joists and fingerjoined lumber. MUF40 was included in the study as a non-conforming adhesive. The range of performance of these adhesives, along with that of melamine formaldehyde (MF) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA) evaluated in a previous study, is baseline information used in defining acceptable performance levels for adhesives undergoing block shear tests required in the proposed standard. Specimens in this study were evaluated under five test conditions: dry, vacuum-pressure wet or re-dried, and three-cycle boil-dry-freeze wet or re-dried. Dry and re-dried test conditions are the proposed test protocols for the draft CSA O112.10 standard. In terms of shear strength and percentage of wood failure, EPI and MUF40 met the requirements of CSA O112.9 for the dry test condition, and PUR did not. The following block shear test requirements are recommended for CSA O112.10, based on the 95% lower confidence limit of the EPI test results, and structured to be analogous to the requirements of CSA O112.9:
Median dry shear strength = 10 MPa (1450 psi) (adopted from CSA O112.9);
Vacuum-pressure re-dried median shear strength = 7.4 MPa (1070 psi);
Three-cycle boil-dry-freeze re-dried median shear strength = 4.4 MPa (640 psi);
Median percentage wood failure = 85% for all the proposed tests (adopted from CSA O112.9); and
Lower quartile percentage wood failure = 75% for all the proposed tests (adopted from CSA O112.9). The above requirements will be discussed in the CSA Task Group, which will eventually make recommendations to the CSA Standards Committee.
Adhesion and Adhesives - Composite Materials
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Jack pine : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5596
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37750
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37750
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Pinus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189F
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Jack pine has gained recognition as the most widely distributed pine species in Canada’s Boreal Forest Region. The species is commonly found on sandy and shallow soils in northern and eastern regions of Alberta. Jack pine typically can be sited in even-aged, fire origin stands with black spruce. Other companions to jack pine in mixed stands include white spruce, balsam fir, lodgepole pine, trembling aspen, balsam aspen, and white birch. Traveling northwest through Alberta, jack pine is replaced by lodgepole pine. The national inventory for jack pine also includes both lodgepole pine and shore pine. Combined, the pine species account for just over 4 billion m3 or 20% of Canada’s total coniferous growing stock. In Alberta, pine accounts for nearly 616 million m3 or 41% of the provincial coniferous growing stock (26% of the province’s combined coniferous and deciduous growing stock). Pines in Canada can be classified into two groups; soft pines and hard pines. Both lodgepole pine and jack pine are hard pines. They have prominent latewood, therefore the wood is moderately hard and heavy. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Pinus banksiana
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Lodgepole pine : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5597
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37751
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37751
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Pinus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189G
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Known as Alberta’s provincial tree, lodgepole pine is recognized by most Albertan residents by its tall straight narrow crown. On average 24 metres in height, lodgepole pine is typically found in dense, even-aged stands formed as a result of forest fires. The species primarily grows in pure stands and less often in mixed stands with other species. However, when in mixed stands, lodgepole pine is commonly found with white and black spruce, trembling aspen, balsam poplar, and Douglas-fir. Lodgepole pine’s geographical distribution stretches to the east of the Rocky Mountains and foothill regions of Alberta. In Alberta, lodgepole pine extends from the southern U.S./Canada border up north to the 56° latitude. The species’ southern range is limited by precipitation within the prairie grassland regions, while its northern range is restricted by the aspen grove condition of the plains. Northeast of its range, lodgepole pine merges with jack pine where the two species hybridize. While smaller pockets of lodgepole pine stands can be found further north, these stands offer limited economic value. The national inventory for lodgepole pine also includes jack pine and shore pine. Combined, the pine species account for just over 4 billion m3, or 20% of Canada’s total coniferous growing stock. In Alberta, pine accounts for nearly 616 million m3 or 41% of the provincial coniferous growing stock (26% of the province’s combined coniferous and deciduous growing stock). Exceeded by only the spruces, lodgepole pine contributes the highest volume to timber harvest in Alberta. Pines in Canada can be classified into two groups; soft pines and hard pines. Both lodgepole pine and jack pine are hard pines. They have prominent latewood, therefore the wood is moderately hard and heavy. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
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Market challenges for the acceptance of prefabricated building systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37783
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Forintek Canada Corp., Alberta Regional Office prepared for ALBERTA FORESTRY RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
91 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Walls
Prefabricated houses
Markets
Series Number
W-2268
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The solid wood products industry in Canada has been primarily based on softwood species producing commodity lumber. However, due to varies constraints (such as the softwood lumber dispute), opportunities for further value added industries and products have been investigated. One of these areas has been prefabricated building systems. Over the past few years, a large number of studies have supported the value-added merits and market rationale of prefabricated home systems versus on-site/stick-built construction practices. Yet, while prefabricated homebuilding technology offers great potential, such as reduced construction cycle time and improved framing quality, the majority of new houses in North America are still framed on-site using the conventional ‘stick-built’ method. It remains the case that outside of the usage of wood roof trusses, modular home components such as floor and wall systems have made insignificant inroads in North America’s home building sector. Taking a market pull approach, the primary objective of this study was to identify the barriers to a wider acceptance of prefabricated construction systems by the homebuilding industry. Homebuilders across Canada and the US were asked to participate in focus group discussions so issues surrounding their perceptions and barriers to prefabricated component use could be brought to light. Through this effort, five major barriers were identified as limiting the use of prefabricated wall panels in residential construction, and areas of market opportunity were identified.
AFRI - 816G-06 pertaining to Prefabricated houses - Markets; Walls
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Mountain pine beetle action plan for Alberta: expert synthesis of existing information and gap analysis

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37876
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Forintek Canada Corp.
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Forintek Canada Corp.
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
194 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Utilization
Trees
Insects
Insect killed
Alberta
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A catastrophic mountain pine beetle infestation (MPB) in British Columbia is now a serious threat to lodgepole pine forests in Alberta, a resource valued at 23 billion dollars. Latest aerial surveys in BC show that the infestation has spread well into the Peace River region. Ground surveys in the adjacent Smoky Forest region in Alberta have now identified more than 2.5 million infested trees up from less than 300 in 2006. Hybrid pines in the northern boreal forest are being attacked. Successful large-scale attack of jack pine forest will have serious economic social and environmental implications for both Alberta and Canada. In January 2007, Alberta Advanced Education and Technology commissioned Forintek Canada Corp, the Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC), the Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada (Paprican) and the Alberta Research Council (ARC) to provide a comprehensive review and synthesis of existing research on mountain pine beetle (western Canada and the US) with a focus on the forest value chain including: detection, control, management, regeneration, harvesting and transportation, fibre quality and processing of mountain pine beetle -attacked timber; and of existing research on market protection, product and market potential for post-MPB wood products, pulp and paper products, bioenery, biofuel, and biochemicals; and of the socio-economic issues of industry competitiveness and sustainability. The review was to include expert assessments of available research and identify gaps in the state-of-knowledge along the forest value chain with a focus on issues relevant to the optimum utilization (volume and value) associated with a possible MPB epidemic in Alberta.
Insect-killed wood - Utilization
Dendroctonus monticolae
Insects - Attack on trees - Alberta
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17 records – page 1 of 2.