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Assessment of fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected truss applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2669
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39268
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39268
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
59 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
AFRI ; 201000788
W-2748
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
There is interest in the lumber and truss industry to supply and use fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected wood trusses. To support this, it is necessary to provide evidence that fingerjoined lumber meeting the requirements of a recognized fingerjoined lumber product standard can be used with the lumber design provision provided in the governing wood engineering design code. In consultation with the truss and lumber industry, it was agreed that fingerjoined machine graded lumber meeting the requirements of the National Lumber Grades Authority (NLGA) Special Product Standard 4 (SPS 4) would be assessed for truss applications. The assessment would need to show no issues with applying the lumber design provisions in Clause 5.5.13 of CSA O86, the Canadian Engineering Design in Wood Code, to NLGA SPS 4 fingerjoined lumber. This is necessary because Clause 5.5.13 was originally developed for non-fingerjoined lumber and applies specifically to the design of lumber in truss applications. The tests carried out under this program included bending test specimens with 1 to 4 joints per specimen tested to failure under three different bending moment configurations, and single fingerjoints tested to failure under pure axial tension or compression, and then under eccentrically applied axial tension or compression to induce bending in addition to the axial loading. All test specimens were prepared using a 2100f-1.8E grade spruce-pine-fir lumber and because the test to failure was typically less than 5 minutes, polyvinyl acetate (PVA) adhesive was used to bond the fingerjoints to facilitate joint fabrication. Additional testing was also carried out to extend the testing protocol developed in 2008-09 for assessing fingerjoint adhesives under sustained tension loads. Samples bonded with a known performing adhesive, phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), were substituted with samples bonded with PVA, a known poor performer under sustained loads. In the bending test, test span configuration and characteristic number of joints showed strong effects on the average bending capacity of the fingerjoints. While more joints in the region of maximum bending moment were expected to contribute to lower bending capacities, this was not as evident in this study. This is likely due to the small sample sizes and the tight control over the joint strength (i.e. low strength variability). Instead, having one or more fingerjoints in the maximum moment zone but near the load points appeared to have a stronger effect. The bending strength reductions were on the order of 5 to 10%. In the combined loading test, loading eccentricity showed a strong effect on the capacity of the fingerjoints in both tension-bending and compression-bending. The tension-bending interaction should be noted for those evaluating online or offline tension test results. Both the tension-bending and compression-bending results are consistent with the assumptions in the CSA O86 design code.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger - Tests
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Block shear testing of CLT panels : an exploratory study

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2759
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad J.
Lum, Conroy
Date
April 2011
Edition
39375
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad J.
Lum, Conroy
Date
April 2011
Edition
39375
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
35 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Timber
Laminate product
Design
Building construction
Series Number
Transformative Technologies #TT1.07
W-2846
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A study was conducted with the primary objective of examining the efficacy of a standard block shear test method to assess the bond quality of cross-laminated timber (CLT) products. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of pressure and adhesive type on the block shear properties of CLT panels. The wood material used for the CLT samples was Select grade nominal 25 x 152-mm (1 x 6-inch) Hem-Fir. Three adhesive types were evaluated under two test conditions: dry and vacuum-pressure-dry (VPD), the latter as described in CSA standard O112.10. Shear strength and wood failure were evaluated for each test condition. Among the four properties evaluated (dry and VPD shear strength, and dry and VPD wood failure), only the VPD wood failure showed consistency in assessing the bond quality of the CLT panels in terms of the factors (pressure and adhesive type) evaluated. Adhesive type had a strong effect on VPD wood failure. The different performance levels of the three adhesives were useful in providing insights into how the VPD block shear wood failure test responds to significant changes in CLT manufacturing parameters. The pressure used in fabricating the CLT panels showed a strong effect on VPD wood failure as demonstrated for one of the adhesives. VPD wood failure decreased with decreasing pressure. Although dry shear wood failure was able to detect the effect of pressure, it failed to detect the effect of adhesive type on the bond quality of the CLT panels. These results provide support as to the effectiveness of the VPD block shear wood failure test in assessing the bond quality of CLT panels. The VPD conditioning treatment was able to identify poor bondline manufacturing conditions by observed changes in the mode of failure, which is also considered an indication of wood-adhesive bond durability. These results corroborate those obtained from the delamination test conducted in a previous study (Casilla et al. 2011). Along with the delamination test proposed in an earlier report, the VPD block shear wood failure can be used to assess the CLT bond quality. Although promising, more testing is needed to assess whether the VPD block shear wood failure can be used in lieu of the delamination test. The other properties studied (shear strength and dry wood failure), however, were not found to be useful in consistently assessing bond line manufacturing quality.
Building construction - Design
Cross-laminated timber
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Checking in CLT panels : an exploratory study

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2772
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Lum, Conroy
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad J.
Date
December 2011
Edition
39389
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Lum, Conroy
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad J.
Date
December 2011
Edition
39389
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
29 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Panels tests
Panels
Laminate product
Building construction
Series Number
Transformative Technologies # TT1.07
W-2877
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A study was conducted with the primary objective of gathering information for the development of a protocol for evaluating the surface quality of cross-laminated timber (CLT) products. The secondary objectives were to examine the effect of moisture content (MC) reduction on the development of surface checks and gaps, and find ways of minimizing the checking problems in CLT panels. The wood materials used for the CLT samples were rough-sawn Select grade Hem-Fir boards 25 x 152 mm (1 x 6 inches). Polyurethane was the adhesive used. The development of checks and gaps were evaluated after drying at two temperature levels at ambient relative humidity (RH). The checks and gaps, as a result of drying to 6% to 10% MC from an initial MC of 13%, occurred randomly depending upon the characteristics of the wood and the manner in which the outer laminas were laid up in the panel. Suggestions are made for minimizing checking and gap problems in CLT panels. The checks and gaps close when the panels are exposed to higher humidity. Guidelines were proposed for the development of a protocol for classifying CLT panels into appearance grades in terms of the severity of checks and gaps. The grades can be based on the estimated dimensions of the checks and gaps, their frequency, and the number of laminas in which they appear.
Building construction - Laminated
Laminated products
Panels - Tests
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Delamination testing of CLT panels : an exploratory study

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39330
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad J.
Date
February 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad J.
Date
February 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
44 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Timber
Mechanical properties
Laminate product
Gluing
Series Number
Transformative Technologies # TT1.07
W-2811
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A study was conducted with the primary objective of examining the efficacy of delamination test using cylindrical core specimens to assess the bond quality of cross laminated timber (CLT) products. A prototype coring drill bit was fabricated to prepare a cylindrical-shaped specimen, the height of which corresponds to the full thickness of the CLT panel. A secondary objective was to examine the effect of pressure, adhesive type, number of plies, and specimen shape on the delamination resistance of CLT panels. The wood material used for the CLT samples was Select grade nominal 1 x 6-inch Hem-Fir boards. Examples of three adhesive types were evaluated, which were designated as A, B, and C. The delamination tests used were as described in CAN / CSA O122-06 and EN 302-2. Cylindrical specimen extracted as core was found satisfactory as a test specimen type for use in delamination testing of CLT product. Its efficacy was comparable to that of a square cross-section specimen. The former is recommended as it can be extracted from thicker panels and from any location in the panel. It would also be more convenient to plug the round hole. Adhesive type had a strong effect on delamination resistance based on the two delamination tests used. Adhesive A exhibited the greatest delamination resistance, followed in decreasing order, by adhesives C and B. It should be noted that no effort was made to find the optimum CLT manufacturing parameters for each type of adhesive. Therefore the relative rankings of the adhesives tested may not be representative. However, for the purposes of this study, the different performance levels from the three adhesives are useful in providing insight into how the proposed delamination test responds to significant changes in CLT manufacturing parameters. Pressure used in fabricating the CLT panel showed a strong effect on delamination resistance as demonstrated for one of the adhesives. Delamination resistance decreased with decreasing pressure. The effect of the number of plies in the CLT panel was dependent upon the type of adhesive, and this was probably related to the adhesive’s assembly time characteristic. These results provide support as to the effectiveness of delamination test in assessing the moisture durability of CLT panels. It was able to differentiate the performance in delamination resistance among different types of adhesives, and able to detect the effect of manufacturing parameters such as pressure and increased number of plies in CLT construction. The test procedure described in CAN / CSA O122-06 appears to be reasonable in the delamination resistance assessment of CLT panels for qualification and quality control testing. Based on the results of the study along with some background information and guidelines, delamination requirements for CLT panels are proposed. The permitted delamination values are greater than those currently specified for laminated and fingerjoined lumber products. This is in recognition of the higher bond line stresses when bonded perpendicular laminations (i.e. CLT) are exposed to the delamination wetting and drying cycles, as opposed to parallel laminations (i.e. glulam or fingerjoints).
Cross-laminated timber
Laminated products - Gluing - Strength
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Development of a complementary suite of Canadian wood adhesive standards

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37818
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
144 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Specifications
Gluing
Glue
Specification
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 26;4378
W-2386
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This project provides a draft of the proposed CSA O112.10 standard, "Evaluation of adhesives for structural wood products (limited moisture exposure)", along with a draft of the commentary which will be a permanent companion document to the new standard. This new standard introduces the classification of "limited moisture exposure" service conditions for bonded wood products. The new classification is useful for a product not intended for exterior use which, however, experiences incidental wetting, such as can occur during transportation, further processing, or even in service. The new classification will enable manufacturers to make the best use of advances in adhesives technology, and will provide end-users with a greater choice in cost, aesthetics, and environmental impact. As well, this report includes a draft of a discussion paper about the new classification, a literature review of typical requirements for "dry service conditions", and the results of a bonding study done in support of the development of the proposed standard relating to block shear test requirements.
Glue - Specifications
Gluing - Influence of moisture content
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Edge-gluing unseasoned S-P-F lumber using a preheating method

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37042
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
July 1982
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
July 1982
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Joints
Series Number
CFS Contract 02-60-56-201
W-250
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Glued joints - Edge
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Fingerjoined lumber for long span truss applications : Phase II. Effect of over-embedding truss plates and fingerjoint offset on plate capacity

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37790
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
41 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Testing
Mechanical properties
Joints
Design
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 45
4320
W-2277
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A research program aimed at examining some issues arising from use of fingerjoined lumber for long-span metal plate connected trusses was carried out in two phases. The first phase examined the effect of truss plate over-embedding and fingerjoint offset on plate capacity in small wood specimens. The results indicated that the presence of joint offset had a significant effect on plate capacity, and that over-embedding the plate into the joint bonded with polyvinyl acetate had significant effects on joint strength. In the second phase, two follow-up studies were conducted to evaluate: i) the effect of truss plate over-embedding on strength of fingerjoints bonded with phenol-resorcinol formaldehyde, and ii) the effect of joint offset on plate capacity in tension perpendicular to grain and in tension parallel to grain in large wood members. The present over-embedding study corroborated the results obtained in the first phase, i.e., over-embedding had a significant effect on fingerjoint strength. In bending, the severity of effect depended upon plate location. Where plates were applied on edge face, over-pressed plates gave 27% lower bending strength (MOR) compared to normally pressed plates and 35% lower than control (not plated), and normally pressed plates showed 11% lower MOR compared to control. Where plates were applied on flat face, over-pressed plates yielded 20% lower and normally pressed plates 14% lower MOR compared to control, but there was no significant difference between over-pressed and normally pressed plates. Plate location had no significant effect on MOR of normally pressed plates and that of control, but did have a significant effect on over-pressed plates. In the latter, plating on flat face gave 23% greater MOR compared to that on edge face. In tension, the severity of over-embedding effect also depended upon plate location. Over-pressed plates gave 29% and 16% lower ultimate tensile strength (UTS) compared to normally pressed plates when plates were applied on edge and flat face, respectively. On both faces, over-pressed plates yielded 18% lower UTS compared to control, but there was no significant difference between normally pressed plates and control. In the fingerjoint offset study, the presence of offset did not have a significant effect on truss plate capacity in tension perpendicular to grain. However, the joint control without offset yielded significantly greater (about 6%) ultimate tensile load (UTL) compared to solid horizontal control. Plate location also had a significant effect on plate capacity. Plating on flat face gave 13% greater UTL compared to that on edge face. This was similar to that observed in the plate over-embedding study. Also, the presence of joint offset did not have a significant effect on plate capacity in tension parallel to grain in 2 x 4 wood members. The present results showed similarities to and differences from those obtained in the first phase depending upon plate grip location. One negative implication is that over-embedding truss plates over fingerjoints should be avoided. This should be inspected as part of truss fabrication quality inspection. On the positive side, generally the NLGA 1/16-inch maximum fingerjoint offset should not impact truss plate capacity in tension perpendicular or parallel to grain.
Glued joints - Finger
Trusses - Joints
Trusses - Design
Trusses - Strength - Tests
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Fingerjoined lumber for truss applications : effect of fingerjoint offset and overpressing truss plates

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37629
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Lum, Conroy
Date
April 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Lum, Conroy
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18;2721
W-1890
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Lumber trusses are an essential part of residential and other light frame building construction. The use of metal plate connectors has been an accepted form of connecting wood members to build up the trusses for these constructions. Wood trusses are a potentially viable application for fingerjoined structural lumber. However, little information is available on the strength of the fingerjoined member when truss plates are applied on or in the vicinity of a fingerjoint. This project deals with issues that may arise from the use of fingerjoined lumber in metal plate-connected truss applications aimed at optimizing the use of wood to meet end-user expectations in terms of structural performance. To meet the objective, a phased approach was taken involving representatives from both the lumber producing and wood truss industries. Phases included: (i) creation of an Industry Working Group (IWG) to discuss the issues that may arise from the widespread use of fingerjoined lumber in truss applications and identify relevant studies, (ii) carrying out the identified priority studies, (iii) and identification of issues that would need additional research. The IWG was composed of 12 members representing truss fabricators, truss plate manufacturers, and lumber producers. The industrial partners in the project are Canadian Forest Products Ltd., Jager Building Systems, Inc., and Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. The members of the IWG convened last year, and discussed potential research items for the project. As a result of the meeting, two basic studies were identified as priorities, namely: (i) effect of fingerjoint offset on truss plate capacity, and (ii) effect of truss plate over-pressing on plate capacity. These two studies have been completed and results are reported.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger
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Impact of extreme pH of structural adhesives on bond durability and wood adhesive CSA standards. Part I

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39189
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Casilla, Romulo C.
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
April 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Casilla, Romulo C.
Zhang, Yaolin
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Value added
pH
Bonding
Adhesives
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 012E
5781
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Nine structural adhesive formulations were selected to evaluate the effect of different curing methods on pH and alkalinity and/or acidity of adhesives. These included four phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins with high pH, one phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF) resin with intermediate pH, two melamine-urea-formaldehyde resins (MUF) with low pH and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resins with low pH. Four curing methods were used to prepare cured resin samples for the study: 1) curing at 102-105oC for one hour based on the CSA O112.6-1977 Standard; 2) curing for four hours at 66oC, followed by one hour at 150oC based on the ASTM D 1583-01 Standard; 3) curing at room temperature overnight based on the ASTM D 1583-01 Standard; and 4) cured adhesive collected from glue line squeezed-out from block shear assembly. The effect of the curing method on pH of the cured adhesive strongly depended on the individual adhesives. For the PF, the alkalinity observed was different for each resin tested in the liquid form, while in the cured form, the difference in the alkalinity depended on the curing method. The MUF and MF were the most affected by the curing method, particularly the MUF, which showed much higher cured film pH values when tested by method 2 compared to the other three methods, while both the cured MF and MUF exhibited quite variable acidity values when measured with the different methods. The PRF showed reasonably uniform cured film pH but varying acidity values when measured with the different methods. A reasonable relationship was observed between pH and alkalinity and between pH and acidity when the adhesives were considered as a group (i.e., adhesives of high pH as one group and adhesives of low pH as another group). Such a relationship was weaker when the adhesives were considered individually. The use of a liquid sample in the determination of alkalinity/acidity of adhesives by titration was more convenient than using a cured film sample. Full title: Impact of extreme pH of structural adhesives on bond durability as related to development and modification of CSA O112 wood adhesive standards. Part I. Investigation of different test methods for measuring pH, alkalinity and/or acidity of cured adhesive films and cured adhesives
Bonding
pH value
Adhesives
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Impact of extreme pH of structural adhesives on bond durability as related to wood adhesive CSA standards. Part III

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39194
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Casilla, Romulo C.
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
April 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Casilla, Romulo C.
Zhang, Yaolin
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
29 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Value added
pH
Bonding
Adhesives
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 012E
5781
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
This is a continuation of the short-term testing performed in Phase II of this study to determine the effects of adhesive pH on wood-adhesive bond durability. In this phase, the Douglas-fir block shear specimens prepared in Phase II using the nine structural adhesives, viz. four high pH phenol-formaldehyde (PF), one intermediate pH phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF), two low pH melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), and two low pH melamine-formaldehyde (MF), were tested periodically for up to 12 months under long-term vacuum-pressure / re-dry (VPD) condition. The VPD consisted of vacuum-pressure treatment followed by 0, 4, 8, and 12-month exposure durations at 50°C. The specimens were dried, in each exposure period, to their original moisture content prior to testing for shear strength and wood failure. Indications of the extent of degradation of the wood layer, adjacent to the glue line due to pH during the long-term exposure, were also examined by the 1 % sodium hydroxide solubility test. The results indicated that the wood-layer samples closest to the glue line, which contained included-glue, showed higher solubility compared to those farther from the glue line. This suggests that wood degradation and/or potential glue decomposition occurred and is considered to be induced by the adhesive alkalinity or acidity under the long-term exposure conditions. The PF showed the best durability performance followed by PRF and MF/MUF. The MF/MUF degraded completely after the 12-month exposure period. For the PF, there are indications that some degree of degradation occurred in the wood layer adjacent to the bond line during the 12-month exposure period, which could be attributed to the high pH of the adhesives. This observation was not apparent for the PRF, and is considered inconclusive for the MF/MUF since they degraded during the exposure period. Full title: Impact of extreme pH of structural adhesives on bond durability as related to development and modification of CSA O112 wood adhesive CSA standards. Part III. Evaluation of block shear properties of selected wood adhesives by long term exposure test
Bonding
pH value
Adhesives
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17 records – page 1 of 2.