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Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Assessing preferences for wood characteristics in visual applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1251
Author
Fell, David
Date
April 2004
Edition
37705
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2004
Edition
37705
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
46 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Materials
Furniture
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 9
W-2069
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
As this is a relatively new field much of the emphasis of this study was on a literature review to help develop a theoretical platform to work from. It was found that the colour of wood appears in the literature in two ways. It appears qualitatively in marketing and value-added research, and it appears quantitatively in colour matching and quality control research. The present research study is the first known occurrence of the quantitative comparison of measured colour with measured consumer preference. There has been considerable research into character marks in wood. This research has largely been based around traditional hardwoods as the result of increasing scarcity of high grades of lumber. However, more fundamental characteristics such a grain profile, rings per inch, and the presence of visual features such as rays and vessels have not been considered with respect to visual preferences. Consumer preference data used for this study originated from the study “Consumer visual evaluation of underutilized Canadian wood species” (Fell, 2002). This was chosen as it has a great variety of species to analyze. However, in the survey consumers evaluated the species for overall appearance and not for specific end-uses. Therefore results of the current study are general to wood used in the home and do not apply to specific end-uses.
Furniture - Materials used
Flooring - Materials used
Canadian woods
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Assessing the market opportunity for treated glued wood products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5728
Author
Fell, David
Toosi, B.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39279
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Toosi, B.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39279
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
62 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Markets
Laminate product
Beams
Series Number
Value to Wood : FPI 125W
W-2773
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
In this study market opportunities for treated glue-laminated (glulam) products were investigated in the industrial wood sector. The main benefits of treated glulam are through-product treatment and the ability to manufacture treated products in shapes and sizes that do not fit into common treating chambers. These attributes provide for very durable and large glulam structures that are appropriate for outdoor use. For these reasons bridges, power poles, and sound abatement barriers were investigated. These are markets where wood has lost market share to or is being challenged by concrete and steel substitutes. The vehicular bridge market was once heavy to the use of wood. Today wood accounts for only 7% of the number bridges in the US and less than 0.9% of the actual surface area of bridges in place. In interviewing municipalities in Canada it is clear that wood is not the preferred material with many wood bridges being replaced by concrete. Further, none of the municipalities contacted were planning wood bridges. However, wood bridges are still being installed. In the US 0.9% of the bridges installed by area in 2007 were wood. This is good news as wood is holding its market share. Steering clear of high volume or large bridges, local bridges are well suited for wood as they are plentiful, small in scale, and many are in disrepair. If 20% of local bridges were built with wood in Canada this would have equalled approximately $51 million in wood bridge construction in 2007. Municipalities are much more open to the use of wood for pedestrian bridges and overpasses. Their quick construction and aesthetics are positive attributes in this application. One municipality contacted is planning multiple wood pedestrian bridges in the next five years. However, for the purpose of this market review there is little published information on pedestrian bridges. Noise abatement barriers are a good high-volume technical fit for treated glulam. Increases in traffic and current road infrastructure improvements will lead to more demand for sound abatement in the future. This market is dominated by concrete, but at a very high price. If treated glulam can give adequate durability and sound performance properties it would be approximately 20% cheaper than concrete. The market for sound barriers in Canada could utilize up to 10 mmbf of wood per year to construct 80 km of barrier. This product can also be marketed as a high-performance acoustic fence for residential markets. Treated glulam was also considered for utility poles. It is transmission grade poles where glulam would best fit the market as the demand is for longer poles which are more difficult to get in solid wood. This type of pole is where wood is currently being displaced by tubular steel. If glulam poles were used in 25% of the replacement transmission poles per year this could equal 8 mmbf. Light poles or standards are another market to consider. While this is a relatively low volume market glulam light standards are a premium product in European markets.
Laminated products - Markets
Beams - Laminated - Markets
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Attributes demanded in single-family floor systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5556
Author
Fell, David
Gaston, Chris
Hansen, E.
Hovgaard, A.
Date
March 2001
Edition
37562
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Gaston, Chris
Hansen, E.
Hovgaard, A.
Date
March 2001
Edition
37562
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
41 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Design
Series Number
W-1735
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The objective of this project was to provide a baseline evaluation of the market fit of new and existing structural floor systems in residential construction. The project focuses on the attributes that are demanded by specifiers of floor systems and the tradeoffs made among attributes when designing and building these systems. This information will aid product manufacturers and the research community in better meeting market demands. The project identified specific attributes that are being demanded of floor systems (including ease of design, ease of construction, costs, safety factors, serviceability, performance, durability, indoor air quality, and walking comfort), and evaluated the trade-off made among these attributes in design/construction. The latter was accomplished through a mail survey of single-family homebuilders throughout North America. Finally, the homebuilders that filled out the survey were asked to offer a detailed description of the installed floors in the last house the built in 1999. The results showed that the respondent homebuilders the three most important floor attributes are, in order, dimensional stability, low installed cost, and ease of on-site construction. 57% of the respondents installed solid wood floors in 1999, followed by 23 % wood I-joists, 9% parallel chord trusses and the balance concrete. When rating floor type against attributes, wood I-joists performed the highest against the top three just mentioned, as well as scoring top marks in design flexibility, technical support, walking comfort and low environmental impact. Out of 15 attributes investigated, wood generally scored higher ratings than concrete except for vibration, sound transmission and fire resistance. It is important to note that solid wood floors scored the lowest of all building materials when it came to the number one attribute, dimensional stability. Results of this study lead to recommendations for extension and/or further research in the following areas; 1. Dimensional stability of solid wood joists. 2. Vibrations in wood floors. 3. Technical support for using solid wood. . 4. Technical transfer on the environmental performance of wood. 5. Further analysis of floors database for specific inquiries. 6. Creation of products/practices/performance databases for walls and roofs.
Floors - Design
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Attributes demanded in single-family walls

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1177
Author
Fell, David
Robichaud, F.
Date
March 2002
Edition
37614
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Robichaud, F.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2002
Edition
37614
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
40 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Walls
Design
Building construction
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38;3280
W-1862
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This study aims at assessing the changes happening within the residential construction industry with respect to walls. There are three major goals of this study. The first is to assess the attributes demanded by builders in single family wall products and systems. The second is to assess product usage and substitution in single-family walls. The third aim is to assess the move to component building in residential walls. A mail out survey was sent to single-family homebuilders in the US, one randomly drawn list of builders plus a list of the top 100 builders in the country. The survey covered builders concerns, attributes demanded in walls, and products and systems used for walls. Results indicated that energy codes were the top concern of builders. Interestingly, very few builders were concerned with engineered wood or prefabricated systems availability, but lumber availability was considered a constraint by some firms, especially the large ones. With respect to walls attributes it is clear that the most important attribute of a wall is straightness and square. However, the next three most important attributes are related to on-site issues; speed of assembly, easy to handle, and low on-site waste. This was especially true for large builders. Cost factored in as moderately important with installed cost finishing ahead of material cost. With respect to walls systems it was found that over 40% of builders have tried prefabricated wood walls. This was strongest in the North. Large builders also were high users of prefabricated wood walls. Prefabricated exterior walls were more common than prefabricated interior walls. Many builders, especially those in the West, used site-built steel for interior walls. In fact, it would appear that of the prefabricated wood interior walls and site-built steel are substitutes. Labour availability is an equal, if not greater, factor than product availability in the competition among building products and systems for residential construction today. Further, demographic forecasts show labour availability decreasing into the future. At the same time the consolidation of residential building firms is giving rise to more automation and off-site building. For these reasons, it is safe to assume that prefabricated building will only increase into the future. Therefore, it is imperative that the wood products industry defines how the competitive advantage their products have always had in the residential construction industry can be adapted and maintained in an era of prefabricated construction.
Building construction - Houses
Walls - Design
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Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
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Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
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Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
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Carte routière pour l'industrie canadienne des produits à valeur ajoutée en bois

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2517
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Fell, David
Laytner, F.
Date
September 2006
Edition
39103
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Fell, David
Laytner, F.
Contributor
Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Date
September 2006
Edition
39103
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
176 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Wood
Utilization
Secondary woods
Processing
Markets
Growth
Canada
Series Number
Valeur au bois no FCC 51
5447
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Le programme Valeur au bois a été mis sur pied en mai 2002 afin de fournir des solutions technologiques aux fabricants de produits du bois à valeur ajoutée de partout au pays. Le volet Recherche du programme a permis de réunir des chercheurs de Forintek Canada Corp., ainsi que de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, de l’Université Laval, de l’Université de Toronto et de l’Université du Nouveau-Brunswick pour examiner les sujets de recherche essentiels au succès à court terme et à long terme de l’industrie. Le volet Transfert de la technologie a contribué à la création d’un réseau pancanadien de spécialistes dans la transformation du bois qui jouent un double rôle. En effet, ils se chargent de diffuser les résultats de recherche et ils aident l’industrie à prendre des décisions d’ordre opérationnel, technique et stratégique. Comme le moment du renouvellement du programme Valeur au bois approche, le SCF a confié à Forintek le mandat de produire une carte routière pour l’industrie canadienne des produits du bois à valeur ajoutée qui permettra d’atteindre quatre grands objectifs :
Déterminer les priorités et les besoins en technologie des sous-secteurs de l’industrie du bois à valeur ajoutée pour les cinq à dix prochaines années;
Trouver des moyens appropriés pour transférer les résultats des recherches à l’industrie;
Définir les objectifs et les mesures de succès des activités de recherche et de transfert de la technologie;
Formuler des recommandations et dresser un plan d’action pour favoriser l’expansion de l’industrie du bois à valeur ajoutée. La carte routière portait sur des domaines de recherche ciblés prenant en considération que les produits à valeur ajoutée se trouvent dans le vaste contexte des chaînes de valeur industrielles. Des questions telles que l’approvisionnement en matériaux, la conception et la mise au point de produits, la technologie et la fabrication, les renseignements sur les marchés et l’accès à ceux-ci, les compétences et la formation, ainsi que de nombreux autres sujets ont été examinées. Six sous-secteurs de l’industrie des produits d’apparence ont été ciblés dans la carte routière : les portes et fenêtres, les revêtements de sol, les meubles de maison, les meubles de bureau, les armoires et comptoirs de cuisine, ainsi que les menuiseries préfabriquées et les menuiseries architecturales. Les produits du bois d’ingénierie et les pièces de charpentes préfabriquées entraient dans la catégorie des produits structuraux. L’information recueillie pour constituer la carte routière a été fournie par plus de cent spécialistes et représentants de l’industrie, surtout dans le cadre d’interviews en personne. Des rencontres individuelles ont été organisées avec des acteurs clés de l’industrie afin : a) de bien comprendre les tendances et les dynamiques intrinsèques qui animent chaque secteur; b) de définir les besoins en recherche et les priorités de l’industrie. Des représentants des partenaires du milieu universitaire ont été invités à passer en revue le résumé des questions issues de la consultation de l’industrie et ont participé à une discussion en table ronde en vue de dégager et d’évaluer des stratégies pour satisfaire les besoins de l’industrie. Il ressort des consultations de l’industrie que le secteur des produits du bois d’apparence et des pièces de charpentes doit faire l’objet d’innovation pour être en mesure de réagir à un certain nombre d’éléments moteurs clés.
Canadian woods - Utilization
Industrial growth - Canada
Secondary wood processing - Markets
Technology forecasting
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Consumer preferences for decking products : North America|Consumer perceptions of decking materials in Eastern Canada and the U.S. / Fell & Lum

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5583
Author
Thomas, J.
Fell, David
Hansen, E.
Date
April 2004
Edition
37703
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Thomas, J.
Fell, David
Hansen, E.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2004
Edition
37703
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
United States (USA)
Canada
Materials
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 5;4055
W-2067
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This study expands geographically on past work on material preferences for decks in Vancouver, Calgary, and Edmonton (Fell and Gaston, 2001). In the fall of 2003 over 1,300 consumers were interviewed at home shows in Toronto, San Diego, Atlanta, and West Springfield (MA). Preferences for deck materials, expected lifetimes, annual maintenance requirements, and price were evaluated using conjoint analysis which explores the tradeoffs consumers are willing to make to get the product that best suits them. This study differs in other aspects than region from the Fell and Gaston (2001) study. Most importantly, three years have passed since the last study. Since then decking, specifically that treated with CCA, has become a prominent issue in the media. At the same time redwood harvests are down and western redcedar entering the US faces duties. Finally, awareness of wood plastic lumber and its availability have increased. For these reasons major differences from the 2001 study were expected. It is interesting that after all the changes to the dynamics of the decking market since 2001, the basic desires of consumers remain the same. Consumers rate material type and expected lifetime of a deck to be the most important attributes. Price and maintenance requirements are secondary requirements. These results are almost identical to those seen in 2001. The practical implications of this result are that consumers appear willing to pay more and do more maintenance for a deck they expect to last longer. Where the most profound differences are to be found is with respect to material. In 2001 (Western Canada) treated wood was of almost equal preference to naturally durable wood, with wood plastic composites being viewed very negatively. Three years later treated wood has a negative perception, and wood plastic is perceived positively in all but one of the study cities. Naturally durable wood remains the material of choice overall. It was especially popular in Toronto. Toronto was the only city where wood plastic was had negative preference. In view of the 2001 results in Western Canada this may indicate that Canada as a country is less open to wood plastic composites than the US. Wood plastic was most positive in Massachusetts where it was preferred to naturally durable wood. Finally, treated wood was viewed least negatively in Atlanta and Toronto.
Decking - Materials used
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40 records – page 1 of 4.