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50 records – page 1 of 5.

Addressing road surface erosion, protecting watercourse crossings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8094
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
March 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
March 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Water crossings
Water
Stream
Stream management
Sediment control
Roads
Erosion
Forest roads
Series Number
Technical Reports; TR 2021 N32
Language
English
Abstract
This report presents the importance of best management practices for mitigating erosion from resource roads and preventing sediment from entering a watercourse. Key to achieving these goals is the understanding of erosion from the road surface and the level of connectivity from the delivery point of the sediment-laden water onto the forest floor and the watercourse. This report provides a list of best management practices that is specific to resource roads.
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Assessment of logging debris disposal piles on spur roads in BC: second year report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49369
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
March 2017
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
March 2017
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Bark
Residues
Roads
Road construction
FOP Technical Report
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2017 n. 23
Language
English
Abstract
Debris management at logging sites and handling facilities is of increasing concern due to the volume of accumulated material and the constrained options for disposal. In March 2014, B.C. Timber Sales (BCTS) provided a timber sale on Maurelle Island that produced a large quantity of detached bark which originated from a 132-ha harvest area. Harvesting was during March 2014, and the predominant source of bark was from 41 150 m3 of Douglas-fir which accounted for approximately half the harvested volume (88 050 m3 total harvest volume). The bark accumulated at both a log storage area and on a transport barge during loading and unloading. The bark was disposed of along two dead-end spur roads (Figure 1). One of the spur roads has a small S6 stream (non-fish bearing) crossing through it. The disposal of logging debris (bark) along spur roads had not been considered or tried before by the Strait of Georgia Business Area of BCTS. The bark for Douglas-fir accounts for 30% by volume, which is the highest overall volume of bark for all softwood species (on average bark accounts for 10 to 15%).
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Closed-bottom corrugated-steel embedded culverts in British Columbia: overview of seven sites

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3955
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
August 2004
Edition
40681
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
August 2004
Edition
40681
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Water crossings
Water
Stream
Steel
Pipe lines
Alloy
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 5, No. 31
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) and the B.C. Ministry of Forests’ Resource Tenures and Engineering Branch surveyed users of closed-bottom corrugated-steel embedded culverts to find installations that generally conform to the Fish-stream Crossing Guidebook that was released in 2002 under the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act. This report describes seven sites that were visited, and includes the installation procedures and costs for each of the sites.
Stream crossings
Water crossings
Embedded pipe culverts
Corrugated-steel pipe culvert
Fish habitat
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Closed-bottom corrugated-steel embedded culverts in British Columbia: overview of twelve sites

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3919
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
September 2003
Edition
40642
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
September 2003
Edition
40642
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Water crossings
Water
Stream
Steel
Pipe lines
Alloy
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 29
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) surveyed users of closed-bottom corrugated-steel embedded culverts within British Columbia and visited selected sites. This report presents information about the installations visited, including the installation procedures and costs. This report also provides suggestions for the implementation of future embedded culverts.
Stream crossings
Water crossings
Embedded pipe culverts
Corrugated-steel pipe culvert
Fish habitat
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Compendium of watershed restoration activities, techniques and trials in Western Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36678
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Gillies, Clayton
Sutherland, Brad
Date
March 1997
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Gillies, Clayton
Sutherland, Brad
Date
March 1997
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
339 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Drainage
Harvesting
Fishes
Forest roads
Landslides
Roads
Sediment control
Stream management
Wildlife
Watershed
Water
Stream
Riparian zones
Research
Renewable natural resources
Operations
Canada
Series Number
FERIC Special Report ; SR-000119
Language
English
Abstract
Forest managers in western Canada are now treating old forest roads and harvested sites to mitigate environmental concerns. This Compendium has been developed to assist practitioners in western Canada in selecting and implementing restoration measures appropriate to their needs and conditions. Watershed restoration activities, techniques and research trials in western North America are described and contacts for further information are given. Additions to the Compendium will be made on an ongoing basis.
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COSIA in-situ oil sands shared practices for working in and around wetlands

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7667
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Osko, Terry
Pyper, Matthew
Date
February 2018
Edition
52674
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Osko, Terry
Pyper, Matthew
Date
February 2018
Edition
52674
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
76 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Alberta
Roads
Culverts
Vegetation
Series Number
Report
Language
English
Abstract
Wetlands are a critical and valued component of boreal landscapes in northeastern Alberta, and they comprise a significant proportion of operational tenures within the in-situ oil sands region. While companies have made progress on avoidance and mitigation strategies to reduce their impacts to wetlands, they also face many common challenges, including pad, road, and culvert settlement; culvert bowing and failure; and tree mortality or other vegetation changes in wetlands adjacent to roads. This document compiles a toolbox of shared practices currently in use by COSIA companies, or which have been used but were found to be unsuccessful.
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Disposal of logging debris (bark) along spur roads

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub44241
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
March 2016
Material Type
research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
March 2016
Material Type
research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Roads
Bark
Residues
Series Number
InfoNote ; 2016 n.9
Language
English
Abstract
Logging operations conducted during the spring may encounter a greater amount of bark sloughing from cut trees than during other times of the year. The sap flow in a tree during the spring can loosen bark, and depending on the tree species, it can result in bark becoming detached more easily during machine handling. In March 2014, B.C. Timber Sales (BCTS) provided a sale on Maurelle Island that produced a large quantity of detached bark. The bark accumulated at both the log storage area and on the transport barge during loading and unloading. The amount of bark on the barge was too much for the offload facility to accept, so it was left on the barge for the return trip to Maurelle Island. The bark was disposed of along two dead-end spur roads.
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InfoNote2016N9.PDF

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Don’t let corrosion ruin your life expectancy: Choose the right culvert for your site

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7682
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Penny, Dave
Date
June 2011
Edition
52828
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Penny, Dave
Date
June 2011
Edition
52828
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Corrosion
Culverts
Roads
Planning
Series Number
FO ResearchNote 2011 N 1
Language
English
Abstract
Galvanized steel (zinc coated) culverts have been used extensively as conduits for water management along resource roads. Practitioners have become accustomed to using galvanized culverts for many applications. There are, however, alternative coatings that may be better suited for local site and environmental conditions, thereby helping extend a culvert’s expected life. Although abrasion, culvert wall thickness, and coatings are all important considerations for determining the life expectancy of a culvert, this research note focuses on the site parameters identified in water samples that can be used as indicators to help avoid corrosion.
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Ensuring access for Canadian forestry operations with wet and weak resource roads

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8044
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Thiam, Papa-Masseck
Bober, Francis
Bradley, Allan
Date
March 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Thiam, Papa-Masseck
Bober, Francis
Bradley, Allan
Date
March 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Forestry
Roads
Road construction
Planning
Water
Series Number
Technical Report TR 2021 N26
Language
English
Abstract
Forest operations across Canada are encountering increasingly difficult road conditions and more frequent access interruptions related to wet and weak road sections. Resource roads are considered a liability by many forest companies and their business model has been to create the lowest cost, lowest standard, resource road network possible that also will provide tolerable levels of access (i.e., some but not too many failures and hauling disruptions). Increasingly difficult operating conditions and frequent access interruptions, however, drive up costs and threaten the economic sustainability of forest operations. Starting in 2017, FPInnovations has launched a project to provide its members with techniques and strategies that will offer more reliable and strong road sections and reduce overall road costs. A state-of-practice survey of FPInnovations members provided researchers with a comprehensive understanding of conventional means of responding to wet, weak road conditions in Canada. The report summarizes the responses to wet, weak resource road sections that were identified in the state-of-practice survey and provides an overview of the chief causes and related site indicators for wet, weak road conditions. Recommended best practices are provided for a variety of conventional industry responses to wet, weak road sections. These address common misconceptions and knowledge gaps that reduce the effectiveness and increase the overall cost associated with the industry responses. These best practice recommendations were based upon findings from a literature review, product manufacturer information, and from researcher expertise. The report also considers improvements to conventional practices, and advanced solutions that are potentially more effective and economic than the state-of-practice but are not widely exploited by industry. Eleven potential solutions from these two categories were compared and ranked in order of potential. The practice improvements selected for further study were soil compaction, and corduroy and access mats. The advanced solutions selected for further study were geosynthetics that offer both soil reinforcement and enhanced drainage, geocells, and TPCS, a technology to improve truck road-friendliness. Starting in 2021, FPInnovations will initiate field trials and life cycle cost analyses of these technologies.
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Erosion and sediment control practices for forest roads and stream crossing, a practical operations guide

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40893
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
December 2007
Material Type
guide
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gillies, Clayton
Date
December 2007
Material Type
guide
Research report
Physical Description
87 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Water crossings
Water
Stream
Stream management
Sediment control
Roads
Riparian zones
Erosion
Forest roads
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 9, No. 5
Language
English
Abstract
This handbook is a compilation of erosion and sediment control practices aimed at aiding the forest industry, and includes background information to support such practices. These practices are often termed Best Management Practices (BMPs). The handbook will offer guidance for erosion prevention and sediment containment along forest roads where the driving forces are rain and moving water; erosion from wind and mass wasting processes will not be covered.
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50 records – page 1 of 5.