Skip header and navigation

16 records – page 1 of 2.

Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
Documents
Less detail

Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Documents
Less detail

Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
Documents
Less detail

Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
Documents
Less detail

Furniture and interior finish opportunities for select underutilized wood species - Saskatchewan and British Columbia. Year 1 report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37645
Author
Fell, David
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
40 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
British Columbia
Saskatchewan
Markets
Furniture
Series Number
3794
PD2003-0109 International Marketing Program
W-1943
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The primary objectives of this study are to demonstrate the feasibility of: 1. Producing high quality value-added products from lesser-used species through prototyping; and 2. Marketing high quality value-added products from lesser-used species through consumer research on the prototypes at home shows. In year one of the project, fibre was sourced and prototype products designed and produced. This was achieved through partnering with eleven companies from the primary and value-added wood industries in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Having carried out these prototyping exercises, there are two main areas to assess after the first year of the project. These are: (1) the appropriateness of the underutilized fibre for use in furniture and interior finish products, and (2) the infrastructure that exists to take the fibre in log form through to market-ready interior finish or furniture products. All six species used in this study were well received by the companies that utilized them in the production of prototypes. All species machined well and were deemed to have appropriate properties for the products for which they were used . In situations where a partner company had never used a certain species, all companies indicated a willingness to use the species in the future, given adequate supply and market demand. Most of the challenges encountered in year one of this project were with respect to gaps in the infrastructure in place. Infrastructure varies among provinces, species, products, and all combinations thereof. However, some general observations can be made that cover most industry scenarios. For interior finish and furniture manufacturers, there seem to exist two extremes with respect to the use of underutilized domestic species: 1. Many furniture and interior finish producers in Western Canada are completely detached from the domestic resource. This is due to the lack of availability of suitable domestic lumber and veneers for their manufacturing needs. In addition, risk aversion with respect to market demand prevents some from using new species. 2. Other manufactures of interior finish have taken the approach of integrating back to the resource by sourcing logs, sawing lumber, and drying lumber, all in addition to their core business of designing, manufacturing, and marketing finished products. Many of these companies report difficulties sourcing logs. In addition, the vertically integrated business model of sourcing logs to marketing consumer products is challenging for smaller companies to excel at. To foster growth in the use of domestic underutilized species in the value-added sector the following infrastructure challenges must be addressed with respect to fibre conversion.
Access to logs is reportedly difficult for smaller producers who specialize in sawing for the value-added sector.
The specialty sawmilling industry that focuses on the recovery of visual grades, grain orientation, and colour sorts has not fully developed in Western Canada.
Drying capacity appropriate for lumber destined to the value-added industry is limited to non-existent in some regions.
Veneers are not available in many underutilized species, stalling the potential growth in lumber demand as the two products are used together.
Prospective demand for specialty lumber and veneers from underutilized species must be clearly documented to warrant investment by specialty sawmills. Key recommendations and industry needs identified after the first year of this study include: 1. Technical transfer to specialty sawmills - These companies need the background, technical information, and tools to produce lumber of underutilized species for value-added markets. Specialty mills must be introduced to the possible grades and sorts that can be produced for this type of lumber, as well the type of sawing optimization that will allow them to recover these grades. 2. Drying facilities – Drying capacity is necessary for lumber manufacturers who wish to be in the value-added market. However, many of these mills are very small and cannot justify the expense of their own kilns. The model of centralized drying operations partnering with multiple small sawmills must be further explored and developed. 3. Marketing and distribution – One of the requirements of the value-added industry is consistent supply. Again, a collection of small sawmills would be better positioned to provide continuous supply than single sawmills. Further, the value-added industry must effectively market their products of underutilized species if they are to provide sufficient demand for specialty sawmills. 4. Veneer availability – Veneers are necessary to establish a new species in the value-added sector as they are used with lumber. Veneer production can be outsourced, as veneers are economical to ship. However, companies wishing to sell a new species of lumber must ensure veneers are an option for their potential customers. 5. Market research – The last component needed is market research indicating to specialty sawmills and value-added producers that there is sufficient market potential for lumber and finished products made of underutilized domestic species. This will be addressed in year two of this project. In year two of this study, the prototypes that have been produced will be the subject of market research on the consumer acceptance of products made underutilized domestic species. Data will be collected at six home shows; two in Canada and four in the United States. Combinations of species, grades, and product formats that have the best market prospects will be identified.
Furniture - Markets - British Columbia
Furniture - Markets - Saskatchewan
Finishes
Documents
Less detail

Jack pine : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5596
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37750
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37750
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Pinus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189F
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Jack pine has gained recognition as the most widely distributed pine species in Canada’s Boreal Forest Region. The species is commonly found on sandy and shallow soils in northern and eastern regions of Alberta. Jack pine typically can be sited in even-aged, fire origin stands with black spruce. Other companions to jack pine in mixed stands include white spruce, balsam fir, lodgepole pine, trembling aspen, balsam aspen, and white birch. Traveling northwest through Alberta, jack pine is replaced by lodgepole pine. The national inventory for jack pine also includes both lodgepole pine and shore pine. Combined, the pine species account for just over 4 billion m3 or 20% of Canada’s total coniferous growing stock. In Alberta, pine accounts for nearly 616 million m3 or 41% of the provincial coniferous growing stock (26% of the province’s combined coniferous and deciduous growing stock). Pines in Canada can be classified into two groups; soft pines and hard pines. Both lodgepole pine and jack pine are hard pines. They have prominent latewood, therefore the wood is moderately hard and heavy. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Pinus banksiana
Documents
Less detail

Lodgepole pine : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5597
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37751
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37751
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Pinus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189G
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Known as Alberta’s provincial tree, lodgepole pine is recognized by most Albertan residents by its tall straight narrow crown. On average 24 metres in height, lodgepole pine is typically found in dense, even-aged stands formed as a result of forest fires. The species primarily grows in pure stands and less often in mixed stands with other species. However, when in mixed stands, lodgepole pine is commonly found with white and black spruce, trembling aspen, balsam poplar, and Douglas-fir. Lodgepole pine’s geographical distribution stretches to the east of the Rocky Mountains and foothill regions of Alberta. In Alberta, lodgepole pine extends from the southern U.S./Canada border up north to the 56° latitude. The species’ southern range is limited by precipitation within the prairie grassland regions, while its northern range is restricted by the aspen grove condition of the plains. Northeast of its range, lodgepole pine merges with jack pine where the two species hybridize. While smaller pockets of lodgepole pine stands can be found further north, these stands offer limited economic value. The national inventory for lodgepole pine also includes jack pine and shore pine. Combined, the pine species account for just over 4 billion m3, or 20% of Canada’s total coniferous growing stock. In Alberta, pine accounts for nearly 616 million m3 or 41% of the provincial coniferous growing stock (26% of the province’s combined coniferous and deciduous growing stock). Exceeded by only the spruces, lodgepole pine contributes the highest volume to timber harvest in Alberta. Pines in Canada can be classified into two groups; soft pines and hard pines. Both lodgepole pine and jack pine are hard pines. They have prominent latewood, therefore the wood is moderately hard and heavy. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Documents
Less detail

Market challenges for the acceptance of prefabricated building systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37783
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
91 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Walls
Prefabricated houses
Markets
Series Number
W-2268
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The solid wood products industry in Canada has been primarily based on softwood species producing commodity lumber. However, due to varies constraints (such as the softwood lumber dispute), opportunities for further value added industries and products have been investigated. One of these areas has been prefabricated building systems. Over the past few years, a large number of studies have supported the value-added merits and market rationale of prefabricated home systems versus on-site/stick-built construction practices. Yet, while prefabricated homebuilding technology offers great potential, such as reduced construction cycle time and improved framing quality, the majority of new houses in North America are still framed on-site using the conventional ‘stick-built’ method. It remains the case that outside of the usage of wood roof trusses, modular home components such as floor and wall systems have made insignificant inroads in North America’s home building sector. Taking a market pull approach, the primary objective of this study was to identify the barriers to a wider acceptance of prefabricated construction systems by the homebuilding industry. Homebuilders across Canada and the US were asked to participate in focus group discussions so issues surrounding their perceptions and barriers to prefabricated component use could be brought to light. Through this effort, five major barriers were identified as limiting the use of prefabricated wall panels in residential construction, and areas of market opportunity were identified.
AFRI - 816G-06 pertaining to Prefabricated houses - Markets; Walls
Documents
Less detail

The North American value-added components industry : overview and market opportunities

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37653
Author
Fell, David
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
April 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Contributor
NRCan Value-Added Research Program.
Saskatchewan Forest Centre.
Date
April 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
United States (USA)
Value added
Remanufacturing
Canada
Markets
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service Value-Added Report;3495
W-1959
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
There is very little information publicly available on the wood components industry. However, as value added companies consider outsourcing wood components rather than purchasing lumber and panels it is important that the wood products industry understand this trend, how it will affect the attributes demanded in their products, and the opportunities available to them for further processing. The primary objective of this study was to provide an overview of the value added components industry in North America. This objective was divided into four sub-objectives or tasks: 1. Technical overview of the component industry. 2. Market overview on value added components and lesser-used species (literature review). 3. Survey of component manufacturers inputs, products, and markets. 4. Survey of component using industries with respect to inputs, products, and markets. The objective was met by sponsoring research and literature reviews under each of the sub-objectives. Stand-alone reports for each sub-objective can be found in the appendices of this report. The keys to wood components manufacturing are efficient processing and fibre utilization. These are historical strengths of the Canadian wood products industries. Component manufacturing provides the opportunity for resource-based companies to move into the arena of value-added production without having to invest heavily in the design, distribution, and marketing capacities required if final products are produced. The most common type of component purchased by secondary manufacturers in both the US and Canadian surveys were cut-to-size blanks. This type of product is very appropriate for companies close to the resource. Lower grades of lumber can be processed into blanks to upgrade their value. By performing this function close to the resource, savings in shipping costs are also realized. The machinery for producing blanks is relatively straightforward and capital investment can be justified by full utilization of the equipment. This requires full order sheets and a continuous supply of fibre. While there appears to be some resistance to the use of alternative species in component consuming industries, species such as yellow birch and yellow poplar provide evidence that substitution is happening. As the lumber markets for white birch and aspen are developing in Canada and the US, component blanks may be a viable outlet for the lower grades of lumber produced. In this way, the component industry may make the development of underutilized Canadian species more viable.
Value added - North America
Markets - North America
Forest products - North America
Remanufacturing - North America
Documents
Less detail

Opportunities and strategies to enhance utilization of Canadian trembling aspen

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37744
Author
Gaston, Chris
Goudie, D.
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gaston, Chris
Goudie, D.
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
45 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Populus
Markets
Aspen
Series Number
4212
W-2187
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Although significant volumes of Canada's trembling aspen resource are being used for pulp and for oriented strand board production, the species can accurately be referred to as "under-utilized" with respect to the production of solid wood products. However, aspen - a species long considered a 'weed' - has started to gain recognition in terms of potential market opportunities for value added applications. This project has served as a follow-up to an earlier study that investigated market opportunites for trembling aspen in Canada. That report (Gaston, 2002) identified several promising marketing opportunities for aspen lumber and specialty products. While market opportunities were identified in all three specified geographic jurisdictions (Japan, Europe and the US), the area recognized as having the most promising potential for high-valued products was Japan - a market where aspen's light colour, lack of grain and light-weight were highly regarded and appreciated. The primary objective of this study was to further explore the Japanese market with intent on achieving a clearer understanding of whether or not: a) the aspen resource can be economically converted to the products desired in the marketplace, and b) sufficient volume of high quality aspen timber can be made available.
Populus - Markets
Markets - Japan
Documents
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.