Skip header and navigation

19 records – page 1 of 2.

Drying performance of tamarack using the superheated steam/vacuum process

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42210
Author
Normand, D.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Normand, D.
Contributor
Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
22 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Vacuum
Steam
Seasoning vacuum drying
Seasoning steam
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Larix
Drying
Kilns
Series Number
3680
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The purpose of this study on tamarack (Larix laricina) was to propose a drying technique adapted to the end use, to document the colour change after drying, and to assess the rot resistance of the various drying processes used. This study was divided into two parts. In the first part, 5/4’’ thick lumber was dried using superheated steam/vacuum (SS/V) drying in order to compare drying results with the results of a study conducted at Université Laval. The Université Laval study compared drying results obtained with three conventional drying schedules: high temperature (115 °C), elevated temperature (90 °C), and standard temperature (82 °C). The study compared drying time, final quality, colour change, and rot resistance. The second part of the study involved drying 7/4’’ thick lumber using SS/V drying. It was clearly shown that drying process does not affect rot resistance of tamarack. However, drying process and operating temperature affect colour after drying. High temperature drying resulted in the greatest post-drying colour change. The SS/V process provided post-drying results that closely matched those before drying. The drying time obtained from the best SS/V test, with a time/quality trade-off, was longer than in the Université Laval high-temperature conventional test (0.9 factor). Compared to conventional drying schedules, the SS/V process was 1.4 times faster than the elevated temperature schedule, 2 times faster than the standard temperature schedule, and 3.4 times faster than schedules used in the industry. Drying times required to reach a final moisture content of approximately 12% in the four 7/4” lumber tests ranged from 132.2 hours to 175 hours. Compared to current industrial results, drying by SS/V is approximately 2.6 to 3.1 faster. Warping was better controlled during the 7/4’’ tests. Winter conditions during the tests made it difficult to maintain conditions in the SS/V kiln. Nonetheless, the use of concrete dead loads on the charges and high temperature conventional kiln drying appear to provide good possibilities for Canadian manufacturers.
NRCan Value to Wood Program which discusses Larix laricina; Seasoning - Vacuum, Steam and Kiln drying
Documents
Less detail

Economic impact of sticker spacing on the quality of kiln-dried sofwood construction lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39043
Author
Normand, D.
Savard, Marc
Date
February 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Normand, D.
Savard, Marc
Date
February 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Drying
Kilns
Softwoods
Costs
Series Number
General Revenue Projet No. 4031
4031
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Lumber warp is the primary cause for drying degrade. Over the past decade, Canadian producers have been paying increasing attention to the box-store market and that of engineered wood products such as wood I-joists and glued-laminated beams (glulam). One characteristic of these markets is that they require straight and stable lumber. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sticker spacing on stickering costs and lumber quality. To address this objective, we conducted tests in three stud mills. Stickers were added as required for the assessment of 48-, 32-, 24- and 16-inch spacings, i.e. 3, 4, 5 and 7 stickers respectively with 8-foot lumber. The bundles of test lumber were dried in a single load in all mills. After drying, the lumber was graded by a grading agency inspector. He determined the potential grade before drying and the actual grade after drying for each piece of lumber. The moisture content (MC) of the test lumber was also determined on a sample basis. In Mill 1, we observed that drying degrade for the entire sample was reduced from 2.2 to 1.3% in the bundles spaced at 24 inches, which represented a gain of $3.21/Mbf. As for lumber meeting the requirements for the special grade, degrade was reduced from 71.3 to 49.5%, which is a gain of $10.41/Mbf. In Mill 2, drying degrade decreased from 32.1 to 26.3% when sticker spacing was reduced from 48 to 32 inches, for an approximate gain of $1/Mbf. In this particular mill, a 16-inch spacing failed to improve performance over a 32-inch spacing. As for Mill 3, reducing sticker spacing from 48 to 24 inches decreased drying degrade in the special grade lumber by half, leading to a $5.33/Mbf gain. Drying degrade decreased regularly from 48 to 32 inches and from 32 to 24 inches. Closer spacing benefited lumber quality at both the top and the bottom of the stacks. Optimal spacing in a sawmill should be based on species and stickering costs. As costs vary widely from mill to mill, the report provides information to help users calculate additional stickering costs. We observed significant gains from reduced sticker spacing. Twenty-four-inch spacing should become standard practice in the manufacture of quality lumber. As a rule, closer spacing requires only limited investments, i.e., the acquisition of additional stickers and, occasionally, minor modifications to the stickering equipment.
Softwoods - Seasoning
Seasoning - Kiln drying - Cost
Documents
Less detail

Element 4 : Hardwood initiative - Development of new processes and technologies in the hardwood industry : Best practices to avoid hardwood checking. Part 1. Hardwood checking - the causes and prevention

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39397
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
March 2012
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
March 2012
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Hardwoods
Lumber defects
Series Number
Transformative Technologies Program ; Project No. TT4.3.03
201005167
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood checking is a major problem that has a significant economic impact for hardwood producers and consumers. Wood checking can occur on logs, green lumber, dried lumber and final products during manufacturing, drying process, storage and end-use. Checking on wood products is caused by many internal and external factors such as wood species, moisture content, storage method, drying process, temperature, relative humidity, air flow velocity and solar radiation. While it is impossible to completely eliminate wood checking; it however can be controlled to an acceptable level with proper measures. The control measures include best practices in harvesting, storage, sawing, drying, chemical coatings, physical methods and controlling end-use environmental conditions. This report provides scientific information on the nature of different types of checks that may occur on various wood products, checking conditions and control measures.
Hardwoods - Defects
Control
Documents
Less detail

End coating to prevent checks on hardwood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39087
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Seasoning
Preservation
Logs
Hardwoods
Series Number
General Revenue Report No. 5366
5366
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood checking at log and lumber ends is one of the most common defect and often results in great loss of wood value. The common method to prevent wood checking is to apply a coating on log or lumber ends. However, the effectiveness of various coating products on different wood species is not clearly established, and the expected efficacy of the products to prevent checking is often not reached. This project was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various wood coatings against wood checking and to optimize application process on log and lumber ends, as well as components of hardwood species. Logs, green lumber and dried components of sugar maple and yellow birch were used in this study. Five commercial coating products produced in Canada and the USA were evaluated, and two application methods were examined. The treatments were conducted on 120 fresh logs, 200 boards and 100 components per wood species in 2006 and 140 logs per species in 2007. The results of the study showed that all coating products used in the tests were able to effectively reduce check development in logs, lumber and components. The best treatment reduced checking in lumber and components up to 100% and in logs up to 80% for a 8-week period. The effectiveness level of the products varied depending on wood species, type of wood products, treating time, application method, and storage conditions. None of the products was totally superior to others under any of the test conditions.
Seasoning - Defects
Hardwoods
Logs - Preservation
Documents
Less detail

Hardwood initiative - Part 5: Development of new processes and technologies in the hardwood industry : Best practices to avoid hardwood checking. Part II. Prevention of checking by proper storage methods

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39910
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
March 2013
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
March 2013
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
33 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Hardwoods
Lumber manufacturing
Storing
Series Number
Transformative Technologies Program
Project No. TT5.7
Project no.301006878
E-4905
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood checking in many wood species causes considerable economic loss in hardwood industry. They can occur on logs, green timber, kiln- or air-dried lumber and final furniture or flooring components during manufacturing, drying processing, storage and end-use. Wood checking is difficult to be completely eliminated, but can be controlled to an acceptable level by a proper protective measure. This report provides scientific data on the effectiveness of the most common and up-to-date protective products and methods to prevent checking in logs, green lumber and components of sugar maple and yellow birch during storage in Quebec. In the experiment, five commercial protective products were tested on logs and green lumber and three methods were evaluated on furniture components after storage for 8 weeks. The results showed that these protective measures were necessary and effective, more or less, to prevent checking in these stored wood products. For protecting stored logs and green lumber from end checking, the most effective treatment was those logs or lumber end-painted with a white coating product. For protecting stored components from checking, the most effective measure was either end sealed with a paper or pile wrapped with a plastic sheet. No checking was detected on any component of sugar maple and yellow birch protected with either of these two methods after exposure to the extreme environmental conditions for 8 weeks.
Hardwoods - Defects
Control
STORAGE
Documents
Less detail

Impact économique de l'espacement des lattes sur la qualité du séchage de bois résineux de construction

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39009
Author
Normand, D.
Savard, Marc
Date
February 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Normand, D.
Savard, Marc
Date
February 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Drying
Kilns
Hardwoods
Costs
Series Number
E-4196
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Le gauchissement des sciages est le principal facteur responsable du déclassement du bois de construction lors du séchage. Dans la dernière décennie, les industriels canadiens se sont intéressés au marché des magasins entrepôts à grande surface et des bois d’ingénierie, comme les poutrelles en I et le bois lamellé-collé. La fabrication de ces produits nécessite entre autres des bois droits et stables. L’objectif de cette étude est de déterminer l’impact de l’espacement des lattes sur la qualité et les coûts de lattage pour le bois de construction. Des tests pour évaluer l’impact de l’espacement des lattes ont été effectués dans trois usines de bois de colombage. Des lattes ont été ajoutées lorsque nécessaire pour évaluer des espacements de 48, 32, 24 et 16 pouces, ce qui correspond respectivement à 3, 4, 5 et 7 lattes pour des sciages de 8 pieds. Les paquets ont été séchés dans le même chargement à chacune des usines. Après séchage, les paquets furent classifiés par un inspecteur d’une agence de classification. Pour chacune des pièces des paquets, l’inspecteur a déterminé le classement potentiel avant séchage et le classement après séchage. Un échantillonnage de l’humidité du bois a aussi été réalisé. Une réduction du taux de déclassement de l’ensemble de la production de 2,2 % à 1,3 % a été observée pour les paquets ayant un espacement de 24 pouces à l’usine 1, soit un gain de 3,21 $/Mpmp. Pour ce qui est des pièces ayant le potentiel de faire la classe de qualité spéciale, le déclassement est passé de 71,3 % à 49,5 % pour un gain de 10,41 $/Mpmp. À l’usine 2, le taux de déclassement de la production complète a diminué de 32,1 à 26,3 % avec une réduction de l’espacement de 48 à 32 pouces, pour un gain d’environ 1 $/Mpmp. L’espacement de 16 pouces n’a pas offert une performance supérieure à l’espacement de 32 pouces pour cette usine. En ce qui a trait à l’usine 3, la réduction de l’espacement de 48 à 24 pouces a permis de diminuer le déclassement de moitié pour la classe de qualité spéciale, soit un gain de 5,33 $/Mpmp. Le taux de déclassement a diminué de façon régulière de 48 à 32 pouces et de 32 à 24 pouces. La diminution de l’espacement permet de diminuer le déclassement autant pour les paquets du dessus du chargement que ceux du bas. Le choix de l’espacement optimal des lattes pour une usine doit se faire en fonction des essences séchées et du coût de lattage. Comme ces coûts sont très variables d’une usine à l’autre, des données pour faciliter le calcul des coûts supplémentaires de lattage sont fournies dans ce rapport. Des bénéfices importants ont été observés lors de la diminution de l’espacement des lattes. Un espacement de 24" devrait devenir une pratique régulière lors de la fabrication de produits de qualité. En général, la réduction de l’espacement des lattes nécessite peu d’investissements, soit l’acquisition de lattes supplémentaires et quelquefois des modifications mineures aux équipements de lattage.
Hardwoods - Seasoning
Seasoning - Kiln drying - Cost
Documents
Less detail

Impact de la vitesse de l'air sur le taux de séchage de l'épinette noire

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42328
Author
Normand, D.
Lavoie, Vincent
Date
October 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Normand, D.
Lavoie, Vincent
Date
October 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Transfer
Simulation
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Drying
Kilns
Heat transfer
Heat
Air
Series Number
Projet General Revenue no 4033
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
La circulation de l’air est essentielle (en séchage conventionnel et par déshumidification) pour le transfert de la chaleur nécessaire au réchauffement du bois, à l’évaporation de l’eau de surface et au transport de cette humidité. Plus la vitesse de l’air est élevée, plus le taux de transfert d’énergie à la surface du bois est grand. Ceci se traduit par une augmentation du taux d’évaporation de l’eau à la surface du bois Quel gain de productivité peut-on obtenir à la suite d’une augmentation de la vitesse de l’air de 100 pi/min? Cette étude a pour objectif de déterminer l’impact de la vitesse de l’air sur la productivité, la qualité et la consommation énergétique du séchage du bois de construction ÉPS de l’est du Canada. Initialement, le logiciel de modélisation Drytek a été utilisé pour étudier l’effet de la vitesse de l’air sur la productivité du séchage. Les résultats des modélisations du sapin baumier, du pin gris et de l’épinette noire ont démontré un effet positif sur la productivité à la suite de l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. Des essais de laboratoire ont été faits sur du bois de construction d’épinette noire 2x4x8’ provenant de la région du Lac-St-Jean au Québec. Ces essais utilisant le même programme de séchage dicté par la teneur en humidité ont été réalisés pour quatre vitesses de l’air différentes soit 300, 600, 900 et 1200 pi/min. L’étude a démontré que la vitesse de l’air a un impact sur la productivité du séchage d’environ 2 % par augmentation de 100 pi/min de la vitesse de l’air considérant une teneur en humidité initiale de 40 % et une teneur en humidité finale de 15 %. Les gains de temps de séchage ont été obtenus uniquement de l’état vert au point de saturation des fibres (PSF). Le PSF correspond à une teneur en humidité de 25 à 30 %. Mentionnons qu‘aucune diminution du temps de séchage n’a été observée sous le PSF à la suite de l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. Ainsi, une teneur en humidité initiale supérieure à 40 % procure des gains supérieurs à 2 % par 100 pi/min et une teneur en humidité initiale inférieure à 40 % procure des gains inférieurs à cette valeur. Les variations de teneur en humidité finale entre les pièces et à l’intérieur des pièces sont similaires pour les essais réalisés à différentes vitesses de l’air. Ceci révèle une qualité des sciages semblable entre les essais. De même, le gauchissement évalué visuellement dans les empilements ne montrait pas de différence significative. La consommation électrique spécifique du système de ventilation est respectivement de 0,1, 0,2, 0,6 et 1,0 kWh/kgeau évaporée pour les essais réalisés à 300, 600, 900 et 1200 pi/min. Cette consommation spécifique est applicable uniquement au séchoir de laboratoire utilisé. Des données industrielles préliminaires nous permettent de croire que la consommation électrique spécifique de l’épinette noire est 0,06, 0,11, 0,14 et 0,18 kWh/kgeau évaporée pour les séchoirs industriels les plus efficaces avec les mêmes vitesses de l’air respectives mentionnées plus haut. Ces valeurs sont à confirmer dans une deuxième phase du projet. Des calculs économiques relatifs aux gains en productivité obtenus par l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air montrent qu’il est possible d’augmenter les revenus annuels pour une capacité de séchage donnée. Un gain en productivité d’environ 2 % par augmentation de 100 pi/min de la vitesse de l’air se traduit par une augmentation des revenus de 1$/Mpmp séché pour un différentiel de prix sec-vert de 50 $/Mpmp. L’augmentation passe à 2$/Mpmp pour un différentiel de prix sec-vert de 100$/Mpmp. Les coûts additionnels doivent cependant être soustraits de ces revenus potentiels pour obtenir le profit additionnel associé à l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. À titre d’exemple, la modification ou l’ajout de déflecteurs ou l’ajustement de l’angle des pales des ventilateurs peuvent procurer des augmentations de la vitesse de l’air à coût très minime pour l’entreprise. La modification ou l’ajout de déflecteurs n’entraînera pas d’augmentation de la consommation électrique significative puisque la même quantité d’air par unité de temps est déplacée. Le changement du système de ventilation pour un système plus puissant impliquera un certain coût en capital et une hausse de la consommation électrique par Mpmp séché. Les coûts additionnels d’opération reliés à ces changements devront être pris en considération avant de procéder à une modification. Il est possible d’optimiser la gestion de la vitesse de l’air en fonction de l’étape de séchage de façon à réduire davantage les coûts d’énergie électrique reliés au système de ventilation, En effet, la vitesse des ventilateurs peut être réduite lorsque la teneur en humidité du bois se situe sous le PSF. Une étude réalisée précédemment chez Forintek a démontré qu’il est possible de réduire la consommation électrique du système de ventilation sans affecter la productivité des séchoirs en abaissant la vitesse des ventilateurs sous le PSF. La présente étude confirme que sous le PSF aucun gain en productivité n’est réalisé par une augmentation de la vitesse de l’air. Les usines ayant déjà des vitesses de l’air élevées ont donc intérêt à baisser la vitesse de rotation en fin séchage pour profiter d’économies d’énergie non négligeables. La détermination du PSF et l’utilisation d’un variateur de vitesse sur le système de ventilation sont nécessaires pour réaliser les gains. Un logiciel a été utilisé dans le cadre de cette étude pour modéliser l’écoulement de l’air dans un séchoir expérimental de Forintek. L’écoulement de l’air dans le séchoir avec un empilement réel a été modélisé. Par la suite, la vitesse de l’air obtenue à la sortie de l’empilement par modélisation a été comparée à celle mesurée réellement dans le séchoir. Des valeurs similaires entre la modélisation et la réalité démontrent le potentiel d’un tel outil pour simuler des modifications au niveau de la géométrie d’un séchoir donné. L’impact direct d’une modification (ex : ajout de déflecteurs, angle des déflecteurs et du toit) sur l’écoulement de l’air pourrait être vérifié avant de procéder aux modifications du séchoir. En résumé, il est très important de considérer les points suivants lors d’une modification du système de ventilation:
Favoriser le passage de l’air dans les empilements. Il faut s’assurer d’avoir de bonnes pratiques de lattage et d’empilement et d’utiliser adéquatement les déflecteurs.
Optimiser l’angle des pales des ventilateurs, ce qui permet d’utiliser adéquatement la puissance installée des moteurs.
S’assurer de la disponibilité de l’énergie calorifique. En effet, la même quantité d’énergie calorifique sera nécessaire pour sécher la même quantité de bois, mais dans un intervalle de temps plus court.
Envisager l’utilisation d’un variateur de vitesse pour diminuer la ventilation en dessous du PSF. Cette mesure favorise la réduction de la consommation énergétique.
Considérer l’impact de la vitesse de l’air sur les systèmes de contrôle utilisant le DTAB (différence de température à travers le bois). La modification de la vitesse de l’air peut modifier les lectures des DTAB habituelles et nécessiter des ajustements des programmes de séchage. Des travaux supplémentaires s’avèrent nécessaires pour compléter les recommandations générées par ce projet. Dans la prochaine année, le sapin baumier et le pin gris seront testés pour déterminer le gain en productivité potentiel de l’augmentation de la vitesse de l’air pour ces essences. La gestion et l’utilisation de la consommation électrique des systèmes de ventilation industriels seront également approfondies. Les différents travaux seront réalisés en collaboration avec le Laboratoire des technologies de l’énergie d’Hydro-Québec à Shawinigan dans le cadre du programme ÉlectroBois II.
Seasoning - Kiln drying - Computer simulation
Air flow
Heat transfer
Documents
Less detail

Impact des changements climatiques (transport) et du séchage sur la formation de microfissures en surface du bois

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39372
Author
Tremblay, Carl
Normand, D.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Tremblay, Carl
Normand, D.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Transport
Surface properties
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Drying
Series Number
Valeur au bois no FPI-203
201003063-Tâche 12
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Des manufacturiers de lames de plancher et de panneaux collés sur chant pour composants de meubles font parfois face à un problème de microfissures en surface du bois. Ces microfissures sont généralement détectées suite à l’application de la finition en usine et parfois même suite à la livraison des meubles ou à l’installation des lames de plancher chez le client. Le problème des microfissures peut donc s’avérer très coûteux pour les manufacturiers de produits d’apparence. Dans le cadre du présent projet, le partenaire de recherche, un important manufacturier de meubles de salle à dîner, témoigne de l’augmentation significative des microfissures observées en surface des composants en période hivernale. Des hypothèses de formation de microfissures en rapport aux conditions hivernales sont avancées. Ainsi, les objectifs du projet consistent en 1) l’évaluation de l’impact des changements climatiques en cours de transport et d’entreposage de panneaux de type lamellé-collé sur la formation des microfissures en surface et 2) l’étude de l’influence du gel en période hivernale sur la formation de microfissures en surface du bois suivant la sortie des chargements des séchoirs. Des essais de conditionnement de composants de tables caractérisés par des cycles de gel et de dégel du matériel ont eu lieu en laboratoire. Les résultats n’ont démontré aucun impact du gel sur la formation de microfissures en surface. Ainsi, les conditions de transport et d’entreposage en conditions hivernales caractérisées par le gel du matériel ne favorisent pas la formation de microfissures en surface des composants de meubles. Un essai de séchage impliquant deux scénarios de refroidissement du bois caractérisés par une sortie rapide du chargement au gel et un refroidissement graduel en séchoir a été réalisé. Les résultats ont révélé que le refroidissement du bois à l’extérieur du séchoir en fin de procédé par temps hivernal n’a pas d’impact sur la formation de microfissures en surface du matériau. Ainsi, sur la base de ce résultat, la sortie rapide d’un chargement de bois (à 50oC) à l’extérieur du séchoir en période de gel ne favorise pas la formation de microfissures. L’évaluation du matériel en usine dans le cadre des essais réalisés a démontré la présence de microfissures localisées en grande proportion dans des portions colorées du bois. Ces zones de couleur s’expliquent par la présence du bois de cœur mais aussi par des taches d’origines chimique et fongique. Certains types de taches associés par exemple à une dégradation fongique ou carie sont caractérisés par une altération des composants cellulaires du bois et une réduction de la résistance mécanique. Ces portions colorées s’avèrent donc propices à la formation de microfissures. La qualité de la ressource aurait donc un impact sur la formation des microfissures observées en surface des composants de bois.
Microcracks
Lumber - Drying
Surface quality
Climate
Transportation
Documents
Less detail

Impact of airflow on the drying rate of black spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38975
Author
Normand, D.
Lavoie, Vincent
Date
June 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Normand, D.
Lavoie, Vincent
Date
June 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Transfer
Simulation
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Drying
Kilns
Heat transfer
Heat
Air
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 4033
4033
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In both conventional and dehumidification drying, airflow is essential to transfer the heat needed to warm up the lumber, evaporate water from the wood surface and remove the resulting moisture. Faster airflow means greater energy transfer at the wood surface. It also means faster water removal from the wood surface. How much productivity can be gained from increasing air velocity by 100 ft/min? The objective of this study was to determine the effect of air velocity on productivity, lumber quality and energy consumption in the drying of spruce-pine-fir (SPF) construction lumber in eastern Canada. The authors initially used the Drytek modeling software to evaluate the effect of air velocity on drying productivity. Modeling studies on balsam fir, jack pine and black spruce demonstrated a positive effect of increased air velocity on drying productivity. They conducted laboratory tests on 2x4x8-ft lumber from the Lac Saint-Jean, Quebec area. These tests used the same moisture content-driven schedule at four different air velocities, i.e.: 300, 600, 900 and 1200 ft/min. The study showed that, on the basis of initial moisture content (MC) of 40% and a final MC of 15%, a 100-ft/min increase in air velocity raised productivity by approximately 2%. Gains in drying time were obtained only from the green state down to the fibre saturation point (FSP), which corresponds to 25-30% MC. Higher air velocity did not reduce drying time below FSP. Consequently, the gains obtained from raising air velocity by 100 ft/min are greater when the initial moisture content is higher than 40% than when it is below that level. Final moisture content variations between and within pieces were comparable at the different air velocity levels, as a result lumber quality was also comparable. A visual assessment of lumber distortion in the piles showed no significant difference. The specific power consumption of the ventilation system was 0.1, 0.2, 0.6 and 1.0 kWh/kgevaporated water respectively at air velocities of 300, 600, 900 and 1200 ft/min, but this level of specific power consumption is only applicable to the laboratory kiln used in the tests. Preliminary industry data suggest that specific power consumption for black spruce would be 0.06, 0.11, 0.14 and 0.18 kWh/kgevaporated water for the same air velocities in the more efficient industrial kilns. These values will need to be confirmed in the second phase of the study. Economic calculations on the productivity gains obtained from higher air velocities indicate that annual revenues from a given kiln capacity can be increased. A productivity gain of 2% resulting from a 100-ft/min air velocity increase yields additional revenues of $1/Mbf of dry lumber, assuming a dry/green price differential of $50/Mbf. At a $100/Mbf price differential, the revenue gain becomes $2/Mbf. Additional costs related to high air velocity should however be subtracted from such potential gains. For example, the modification or addition of baffles, or the adjustment of fan blades may lead to higher air velocity at minimal cost to the company; and power consumption will not increase significantly, as the system continues to move the same quantity of air per unit of time. If, on the other hand, a more powerful ventilation system is required, this will involve some capital cost as well as increased power consumption per unit of dry lumber. Mills should take these additional costs into consideration before deciding whether to modify the equipment. To minimize electrical energy costs when increasing air velocity, producers can also adjust air velocity in relation to the different phases of the drying schedule, given that fan speed can be reduced when the lumber moisture content falls below the fibre saturation point. A previous Forintek study showed that lower fan speed below the FSP level could reduce power consumption with no negative effect on kiln productivity. The current study confirmed that higher air velocity did not result in productivity gains below the FSP level. Mills using high air velocities would therefore generate substantial cost savings by lowering fan speed in the final phases of the cycle. This would require some means to identify when the FSP is reached and the use of variable speed drives for the air circulation system. As part of this study, we used a software program to model airflow in one of Forintek’s experimental kilns with an actual lumber load. We then compared air velocity on the exit side of the stack according to the model versus actual velocity as measured in the kiln. As the values obtained from the two sources were similar, we believe that our model may prove a very useful tool to simulate the effect of modifying kiln geometry. It will allow producers to assess the effect of modifications such as new or modified baffles or a different roof angle on airflow before they make any decision. In summary, lumber manufacturers should keep the following points in mind before deciding to modify the airflow system:
Ensure sufficient air space in-between rows with good stickering and stacking practices, as well as proper use of baffles.
Optimize fan blade angle in order to use installed motor power as efficiently as possible.
Ensure that the system can provide sufficient heat energy. With increased airflow, the kiln will require the same amount of heat energy to dry a given load, but over a shorter period of time.
Consider installing a variable-speed drive to reduce airflow below the fibre saturation point, thus reducing energy consumption.
Consider the effect of air velocity on systems based on the temperature drop across the load (TDAL). Adjustments to airflow may result in changes to TDAL measurements and require modifications to the drying schedule. Further work is needed to finalize the recommendations based on this study. Over the coming year, we will run tests on balsam fir and jack pine to determine potential productivity gains from increased airflow with these species. We will also analyze in more detail how power should best be managed and used under industrial conditions. These follow-up studies will be conducted in collaboration with Hydro Quebec’s Laboratoire des Technologies de l’Énergie (LTE), in Shawinigan, Quebec as part of our joint Électrobois II program.
Seasoning - Kiln drying - Computer simulation
Air flow
Heat transfer
Documents
Less detail

Élément 4 : Initiative de recherche sur les bois feuillus - Développement de nouveaux procédés et de nouvelles technologies pour le secteur des bois feuillus ; Meilleures pratiques pour éviter la formation de gerces et de fentes sur les produits de bois feuillus. Première partie - Gerces et fentes : causes et prévention

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39912
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
April 2014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Normand, D.
Date
April 2014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Hardwoods
Lumber defects
Series Number
Programme des technologies transformatrices
Projet no TT4.3.03
Project no.201005167
E-4906
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Hardwoods - Defects
Control
Abstract
La formation de gerces et de fentes sur les produits du bois est un problème majeur pour les fabricants de produits de bois feuillus et les consommateurs. En effet, des gerces et des fentes peuvent se former sur les billes, les sciages verts et séchés et sur les produits finaux et ce, en cours de fabrication, de séchage, de transformation, d’entreposage et d’utilisation finale des produits du bois. De nombreux facteurs internes et externes influent sur la formation de gerces et de fentes. Signalons notamment l’essence, la teneur en humidité du bois, la méthode d’entreposage, les procédés de séchage, la température, l’humidité relative, la vitesse de l’écoulement de l’air et les rayons solaires. Bien qu’il soit impossible d’empêcher complètement la formation de gerces et de fentes, il est toutefois possible d’en limiter le nombre à un niveau acceptable par l’application de mesures appropriées. Parmi ces mesures, on compte non seulement les meilleures pratiques relatives à la récolte, à l’entreposage, au débitage et au séchage du bois, mais aussi l’utilisation de dispositifs mécaniques et le contrôle des conditions ambiantes de l’utilisation des produits finaux. Le présent rapport fait état de connaissances scientifiques sur la nature de différents types de gerces susceptibles de se manifester sur divers produits du bois, les conditions qui en favorisent la formation et les mesures de contrôle connexes.
Documents
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 2.