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Advanced methods of encapsulation

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6091
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, A.
Date
November 2016
Edition
44220
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, A.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
November 2016
Edition
44220
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
66 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Wood frame
Design
Fire
Series Number
W-3261
Language
English
Abstract
Neither the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) [1], nor any provincial code, such as the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC) [2], currently provide “acceptable solutions” to permit the construction of tall wood buildings, that is buildings of 7 stories and above. British Columbia, however, was the first province in Canada to allow mid-rise (5/6 storey) wood construction and other provinces have since followed. As more mid-rise wood buildings are erected, their benefits are becoming apparent to the industry, and therefore they are gaining popularity and becoming more desirable. Forest product research has now begun to shift towards more substantial buildings, particularly in terms of height. High-rise buildings, typically taller than 6 storeys, are currently required to achieve 2 h fire resistance ratings (FRR) for floors and other structural elements, and need to be of non-combustible construction, as per the “acceptable solutions” of Division B of the NBCC [1]. In order for a tall wood building to be approved, it must follow an “alternative solution” approach, which requires demonstrating that the design provides an equivalent or greater level of safety as compared to an accepted solution using non-combustible construction. One method to achieve this level of safety is by ‘encapsulating’ the assembly to provide additional protection before wood elements become involved in the fire, as intended by the Code objectives and functional statements (i.e., prolong the time before the wood elements potentially start to char and their structural capacity is affected). It is also necessary to demonstrate that the assembly, in particular the interior finishes, conform to any necessary flame spread requirements. The Technical Guide for the Design and Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada [3] recommends designing a tall wood building so that it is code-conforming in all respects, except that it employs mass timber construction. The guide presents various encapsulation methods, from full encapsulation of all wood elements to partial protection of select elements. National Research Council Canada (NRC), FPInnovations, and the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) began specifically investigating encapsulation techniques during their Mid-Rise Wood Buildings Consortium research project, and demonstrated that direct applied gypsum board, cement board and gypsum-concrete can delay the effects of fire on a wood substrate [4]. There is extensive data on the use of gypsum board as a means of encapsulation for wood-frame assemblies and cold-formed steel assemblies. However, tall wood buildings are more likely to employ mass timber elements due to higher load conditions, requirements for longer fire resistance ratings, as well as other factors. There is little knowledge currently available related to using gypsum board directly applied to mass timber, or in other configurations, for fire protection. Testing performed to date has been limited to direct applied Type X gypsum board using standard screw spacing, and showed promising results [5, 6, 7]. This represents an opportunity for other configurations that might provide enhanced protection of wood elements to be investigated. Being able to provide equivalent fire performance of assemblies between non-combustible and combustible construction will thus improve the competiveness of tall timber buildings by providing additional options for designers.
Revision of March 2015 edition
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CLT fire resistance tests in support of tall wood building demonstration projects

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3425
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
November 2014
Edition
40099
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
November 2014
Edition
40099
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Fire
Resistance
Laminate product
Structural composites
Series Number
Transformative Technologies - Fire Performance
E-4949
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
These tests were performed to support the approval and construction of a tall wood building in Quebec City (13-storey). While a calculation methodology is provided in Chapter 8 (Fire) of the CLT Handbook [3], the Association des Chefs en Sécurité Incendie du Québec (ACSIQ), the Régie du bâtiment du Québec (RBQ) and other stakeholders requested these tests be performed so that they could witness the actual fire performance of the specified assemblies. As such, the main objective was to demonstrate at least a 2 h FRR of the CLT assemblies, which is the minimum required rating as prescribed by the National Building Code of Canada [4] for structural elements and fire separation walls of exit stair ways and elevators shafts in tall buildings (greater than 6 storeys). Numerous representatives from Quebec and Ontario were present for either one or both days of testing, including RBQ, the Cities of Montreal, Ottawa, and Quebec City as well as fire services personnel from Montreal, Ottawa and Gatineau. FPInnovations, Nordic, the Canadian Wood Council (CWC), and CHM fire consultants were also in attendance.
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Development of a Canadian fire-resistance design method for massive wood members

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39731
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
January 2013
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Osborne, Lindsay
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
January 2013
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
37 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Fire
Building construction
Design
Series Number
301006148
E-4821
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Building regulations require that key building assemblies exhibit sufficient fire-resistance to allow time for occupants to escape and to minimize property losses. The intent is to compartmentalize the structure to prevent the spread of fire and smoke, and to ensure structural adequacy to prevent or delay collapse. The fire-resistance rating of a building assembly has traditionally been assessed by subjecting a replicate of the assembly to the standard fire-resistance test, (ULC S101 in Canada, ASTM E119 in the USA and ISO 834 in most other countries). Massive wood elements such as solid sawn timbers, glued laminated timber (glulam) and structural composite lumber (SCL) can provide excellent fire-resistance. This is due to the inherent nature of thick timber members to char slowly when exposed to fire allowing massive wood systems to maintain significant structural resistance for extended durations when exposed to fire. Calculating the fire-resistance of massive wood elements can be relatively simple because of the essentially constant and predictable rate of charring during the standard fire exposure. Charred wood is assumed to no longer provide any strength and stiffness; therefore the remaining (or reduced) cross-section must be capable of carrying the load. This report presents two (2) mechanics-based design procedures as alternative design methods to conducting fire-resistance tests in compliance with ULC S101 or to using Appendix D-2.11 of the NBCC, which is limited to glulam members stressed in bending or axial compression. The procedures are applicable to solid sawn timber, glulam or SCL structural members and aim at developing a suitable calculation method that would provide accurate fire-resistance predictions when compared to test data. The long-term objective is to provide recommendations for incorporating either method into CSA O86 and/or NBCC. The comparisons between the proposed methodologies and the experimental data for beams, columns and tension members show good agreement. While further refinement of these methods is possible, these comparisons suggest that the use of the CSA O86 equations and a load combination for rare events adequately address fire-resistance design of massive wood members.
Solid Wood Products
Glulam
Structural building components
Cross-laminated timber
Buildings - Design
FIRE RESISTANCE
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Fire resistance of long span composite wood-concrete floor systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40130
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
March 2015
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
March 2015
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Structural composites
Floors
Wood
Concrete
Fire
Series Number
E-4959
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
There is a need to evaluate TCC systems under fire conditions to understand how shear connectors will perform and might affect the fire performance and the composite action of the assembly. This project evaluates the fire performance of TCC assemblies based on their structural resistance, integrity and insulation when exposed to a standard fire, as well as how mass timber and concrete interact. This study involves full-scale fire resistance tests on composite wood-concrete floors using two types of shear connectors. 301009649
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Fire-resistance test report of E1 stress grade cross-laminated timber assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42918
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Date
August 2013
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Contributor
Service canadien des forêts.
Date
August 2013
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Fire
Building construction
Composites
Series Number
E-4824
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
A series of 3 cross-laminated timber (CLT) fire-resistance tests were conducted in accordance with ULC S101 standard as required in the National Building Code of Canada. The first two tests were 3-ply wall assemblies which were 105 mm thick, one unprotected and the other protected with an intumescent coating, FLAMEBLOC® GS 200, on the exposed surface. The walls were loaded to 295 kN/m (20 250 lb./ft.). The unprotected assembly failed structurally after 32 minutes, and the protected assembly failed after 25 minutes. The third test consisted of a 175 mm thick 5-ply CLT floor assembly which used wood I-joists, resilient channels, insulation and 15.9 mm ( in.) Type X gypsum board protection. A uniform load of 5.07 kPa (106 lb./ft²) was applied. The floor assembly failed after 138 min due to integrity.
CROSS LAYING
FIRE RESISTANCE
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Fire safety design of buildings of wood or hybrid construction : development of fire resistance calculation methods for CLT

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39381
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Timber
Systems
Safety
Laminate product
Hybrid
Design
Series Number
Transformative Technology ; Project TT.1.06 I
201002774
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The overall objective of this research is to develop a methodology that will foster the design of fire-safe buildings of wood or hybrid construction. This project aims to develop a design methodology (i.e., calculation methods) which will allow the calculation of the fire-resistance of CLT assemblies/construction. The methodology will take into account the thickness and number of laminations and their orientation, the species and strength properties of the laminations, the load imposed on the panel, and any additional fire protection such as gypsum board or plywood. This will provide manufacturers and designers a methodology to predict the fire-resistance of panels for use in various applications. In order to establish calculation methods a series of experimental tests has been undertaken. To date, two CLT fire-resistance tests have been conducted at the NRC fire laboratory where the panels were subject to standard CAN/ULC-S101 fire exposure. Both 3-ply CLT assemblies consisted of 38 x 89 mm black spruce boards, where the two outer longitudinal plies consisted of SPF 1650Fb-1.5E machine stress-rated (MSR) lumber, and the inner transverse ply was SPF No.3/stud. Each panel was protected with two layers of 12.7 mm CGC Sheetrock® FireCode® Core Type X gypsum board. Thermocouples were placed behind each layer of gypsum board and embedded at 19-mm increments into the panels to a depth of 76 mm. The first test was a floor assembly, where a load of 2.7 kPa was applied. The test was ended after 77 minutes due to equipment concerns from the laboratory staff, therefore structural failure was not reached. The greatest measured char depth in the panel was 11.2 mm. The maximum deflection of the floor was 32.1 mm. The second test was a wall assembly, which failed due to buckling after 106 minutes when subjected to 333 kN/m. From one data point a charring rate of 0.4 mm/min was calculated. The maximum deflection of the wall was 55.3 mm. From the thermocouple data, it was determined that the two layers of gypsum delayed the onset of charring in both the floor and wall tests by approximately 60 minutes. So far the proposed calculation methods have proved to be conservative in predicting the time to structural failure and charring rates. Due to the difficulty of sourcing CLT assemblies to test, six additional full-scale fire resistance tests are to be completed in 2011-2012. The current test plan includes testing two more wall assemblies and four more floor assemblies. Tentatively, the next set of floor tests to be completed will be on a 5 ply unprotected assembly with the only difference between them being the type of adhesive used. Similarly, a 5-ply unprotected wall assembly will be tested. A composite floor assembly consisting of CLT with a concrete toping is also planned to be tested. This leaves one wall and one floor test to be finalized allowing for investigation of any questions raised in the tests identified above.
Fire safety design
Hybrid systems
Cross-laminated timber
Wood frame buildings
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Full-scale mass timber shaft demonstration fire, final report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7814
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Date
April 2015
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Contributor
MFFP
Date
April 2015
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
74 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Fire
Building construction
Design
Testing
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In November 2014, the Department supported the conduct of a large-scale demonstration fire at the facilities of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC). The demonstration fire was carried out to support a high-rise building construction project in Quebec City. The aim was to demonstrate how a massive wooden structure could withstand severe fire exposure conditions of at least two hours. The structure consisted of a vertical shaft of massive timber construction designed for an exit elevator or staircase. The demonstration fire was carried out by a team made up of FPInnovations, Nordic Engineered Wood, GHL
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Glulam and CLT innovative manufacturing process and products development : effects of manufacturing parameters on the fire-resistance of CLT assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39850
Author
Grandmont, Jean-Francois
Dagenais, Christian
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
June 2014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Grandmont, Jean-Francois
Dagenais, Christian
Osborne, Lindsay
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
June 2014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
35 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Laminate product
Fire
Resistance
Series Number
301007960
E-4888
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
This study was part of a broader project entitled Glulam and CLT Innovative Manufacturing Process and Product Development. The main objective of the current study is to evaluate the effect of CLT panels manufacturing parameters on its fire resistance. More specifically: § To evaluate the effect of CLT manufacturing (gluing) parameters on the heat delamination resistance under standard fire conditions; § To improve the fire-resistance of the CLT panels.
Glulam
Laminated products - Fire resistance
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Incendie de démonstration à grande échelle de gaine verticale de construction massive en bois, rapport final

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7815
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Date
Avril 2015
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Contributor
MFFP
Date
Avril 2015
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
75 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Fire
Building construction
Design
Testing
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
En novembre 2014, le Ministère soutenait la réalisation d’un incendie de démonstration à grande échelle effectué dans les installations du Conseil national de recherches du Canada (CNRC). L’incendie de démonstration a été réalisé afin d’appuyer un projet de construction d’un immeuble de grande hauteur à Québec. Le but était de démontrer la façon dont une structure massive en bois pouvait résister à des conditions sévères d’exposition au feu d’au moins deux heures. La structure consistait en une gaine verticale de construction massive en bois conçue pour un ascenseur ou un escalier de sortie. L’incendie de démonstration a été réalisé par une équipe composée de FPInnovations, Nordic Bois d’ingénierie, GHL Consultants, la firme Technorm et du CNRC.
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New concepts in wood I-joist manufacturing and utilization : fire resistant wood I-joist

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39821
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Date
May 2014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
PDF
Ajoutez cet article à votre liste de sélections pour demander le PDF - Add this item to your selection list to request the PDF
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
May 2014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Joists
Fire
Resistance
Series Number
Transformative Technologies
Project no.301007961
E-4876
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The objective of the study is to identify current and available solutions for improving the fire resistance of wood I-joists. After an analysis and comparison of these technologies, the most promising solutions will be presented which will be suggested to wood I-joist manufacturers for potential further investigation.
Wood I-joists
Fire Resistant - Joints
PDF
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11 records – page 1 of 2.