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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Documents
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Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
Documents
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Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
Documents
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Jack pine : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5596
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37750
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37750
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Pinus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189F
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Jack pine has gained recognition as the most widely distributed pine species in Canada’s Boreal Forest Region. The species is commonly found on sandy and shallow soils in northern and eastern regions of Alberta. Jack pine typically can be sited in even-aged, fire origin stands with black spruce. Other companions to jack pine in mixed stands include white spruce, balsam fir, lodgepole pine, trembling aspen, balsam aspen, and white birch. Traveling northwest through Alberta, jack pine is replaced by lodgepole pine. The national inventory for jack pine also includes both lodgepole pine and shore pine. Combined, the pine species account for just over 4 billion m3 or 20% of Canada’s total coniferous growing stock. In Alberta, pine accounts for nearly 616 million m3 or 41% of the provincial coniferous growing stock (26% of the province’s combined coniferous and deciduous growing stock). Pines in Canada can be classified into two groups; soft pines and hard pines. Both lodgepole pine and jack pine are hard pines. They have prominent latewood, therefore the wood is moderately hard and heavy. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Pinus banksiana
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Lodgepole pine : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5597
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37751
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37751
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Pinus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189G
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Known as Alberta’s provincial tree, lodgepole pine is recognized by most Albertan residents by its tall straight narrow crown. On average 24 metres in height, lodgepole pine is typically found in dense, even-aged stands formed as a result of forest fires. The species primarily grows in pure stands and less often in mixed stands with other species. However, when in mixed stands, lodgepole pine is commonly found with white and black spruce, trembling aspen, balsam poplar, and Douglas-fir. Lodgepole pine’s geographical distribution stretches to the east of the Rocky Mountains and foothill regions of Alberta. In Alberta, lodgepole pine extends from the southern U.S./Canada border up north to the 56° latitude. The species’ southern range is limited by precipitation within the prairie grassland regions, while its northern range is restricted by the aspen grove condition of the plains. Northeast of its range, lodgepole pine merges with jack pine where the two species hybridize. While smaller pockets of lodgepole pine stands can be found further north, these stands offer limited economic value. The national inventory for lodgepole pine also includes jack pine and shore pine. Combined, the pine species account for just over 4 billion m3, or 20% of Canada’s total coniferous growing stock. In Alberta, pine accounts for nearly 616 million m3 or 41% of the provincial coniferous growing stock (26% of the province’s combined coniferous and deciduous growing stock). Exceeded by only the spruces, lodgepole pine contributes the highest volume to timber harvest in Alberta. Pines in Canada can be classified into two groups; soft pines and hard pines. Both lodgepole pine and jack pine are hard pines. They have prominent latewood, therefore the wood is moderately hard and heavy. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
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Market and attribute trends for appearance wood products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5900
Author
Fell, David
Bell, Barbara
Rice, J.
Date
March 2008
Edition
41397
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Fell, David
Bell, Barbara
Rice, J.
Date
March 2008
Edition
41397
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
71 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Materials
Markets
Building construction
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC27W
W-2569
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Trendspotting is an important tool in enabling manufacturers to be proactive rather than reactive in their businesses. This year we tracked trends in the window, door, cabinet, and outdoor projects segments. A multidisciplinary team from marketing, design, and industry advising pulled together a list of trends that are currently or imminently going to affect these sectors. Trends revolved around demographics, new materials, alternative species, sustainability, the economy, and other factors. Each potential trend was researched as to current and potential opportunities and threats. Four separate trend reports resulted from this effort: Part A - Doors, Part B - Windows, Part C - Cabinets, and Part D - Outdoor Living. Some of the trends in this document are already established while others are in their infancy. As a manufacturer it is up to you to pick and choose the trends and opportunities that best suit your manufacturing, marketing, and customer profile. We hope this document can tip you off to new opportunities, alert you to some pitfalls, and inspire your product lines. Good luck!
Building construction - Materials used
Environmental factors
Markets - Estimating
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Tamarack : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5598
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37752
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37752
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Larix
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189H
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Tamarack, also referred to as eastern larch, primarily grows east of the Rockies. It is commonly found in peatland areas, in association with black spruce, on the edge of lakes and waterways. Tamarack stands, however, are absent in the far northwest of the Boreal forest. The species grows slowly, reaching an average 15 to 18 metres in height and 25 to 50 cm in diameter; however, on moist, well-drained soils, the tree can reach as high as 25 metres. Within Alberta, tamarack grows throughout the central and northern areas of the province, rarely in pure stands. On a national level, tamarack is grouped together with ‘other coniferous’ species, accounting for approximately 4% of Canada’s total forest inventory. Tamarack accounts for a mere 0.2% of Alberta’s softwood inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Larix laricina
Documents
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Trembling aspen : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5599
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37753
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37753
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189I
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Trembling aspen is one of the most widely distributed tree species in North America. It grows from Alaska to Newfoundland, and south to northern Mexico. The tree often appears in pure stands and grows in many soil conditions from sea level to 3000 metres. In northeastern British Columbia, Alberta and much of Saskatchewan, aspen is commonly found with balsam poplar and white birch. Aspen mixed with the spruces and pines form communities that dominate over half of Alberta’s forests. Once referred as a “weed” species and a huge and hidden hardwood resource, trembling aspen, grouped together with balsam poplar constitutes 14% of Canada’s total forest inventory, and 81.3% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus tremuloides
Documents
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White birch : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5600
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2005
Edition
37754
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2005
Edition
37754
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189J
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
White birch is a common tree species found throughout the Boreal forest across a broad range of site conditions. A native Alberta species, this tree is easily recognized by its smooth, white peeling bark. Intolerant of shade, white birch thrives on burnedover and cutover areas. White birch closely parallels the distribution of poplars in Alberta, found throughout the province with the exception of dryer southeastern regions. Within the Aspen Grove Section in Alberta and Saskatchewan, birch has a sporadic distribution, usually found only on rough, broken land. It has a scattered representation at the Lower Foothills, and sparse representation at the Upper Foothills of Alberta. Within the Mixedwood Forests, white birch occurs in varying proportions on well-drained uplands. It is very seldom found in pure stands of significant commercial size. On a national level, white birch is inventoried with all other birches, except yellow birch; and makes up 4.7% of the national forest inventory (16.5% of Canada’s hardwood inventory). Within Alberta, white birch constitutes 3.6% of the province’s hardwood inventory; 1.3% of total provincial forest inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Betula papyrifera
Documents
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11 records – page 1 of 2.