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75 records – page 1 of 8.

Assessment of fire hazards in a wood-products manufacturing plant

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5952
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Aston, R.
Tardif, Y.G.
Batista, M.
Date
July 2000
Edition
41938
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Aston, R.
Tardif, Y.G.
Batista, M.
Date
July 2000
Edition
41938
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood
Research
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 6
E-3404
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Fire Research
Fire hazards
Wood Products
Manufacturing plant
Documents
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Bituminous coatings as moisture barriers for preserved wood foundations

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4695
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Shields, J.A.
Date
April 1984
Edition
41495
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Shields, J.A.
Date
April 1984
Edition
41495
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood foundations
Wood
Preserved wood
Series Number
E-622
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preserved wood foundations
Documents
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Codes and standards requirements and issues for white spruce siding

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37664
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
O'Connor, J.
Richardson, L.R.
Date
December 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
O'Connor, J.
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Alberta Sustainable Resource Development
Date
December 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Specifications
Siding
Picea
Specification
Series Number
W-1979
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report summarises those issues embodied in building codes and product standards with implications for marketing solid wood siding in Canada and selected other countries. The intention is that technical knowledge gaps can be identified and possibly filled before marketing white spruce siding. Literature searches were done and personal contacts with experts in these countries were made in order to place siding in the context of international codes and standards. However database searches identified only a few documents related to the performance requirements of solid wood cladding products. These issues are discussed under three main headings: material and construction, fire resistance and durability, and weather protection. Apart from fire there is very little reference to solid wood siding in either North American or international building codes. It appears that the long use of the product has effectively been grandfathered in traditional siding application and use. This is, however, not the case for non-solid wood siding where a number of material-specific standards exist which ensure that the products have comparable performance to traditional products or to address performance deficiencies that are specific to that material. Wood siding use in new markets will not be grandfathered in, and there will probably be a need to develop standards and data similar to those for non-wood products.
Siding - Specifications
Picea glauca
Documents
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Development of a fire endurance research program for wood construction assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38219
Author
El-Shayeb, M.
Richardson, L.R.
Cornelissen, Alicje A.
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
El-Shayeb, M.
Richardson, L.R.
Cornelissen, Alicje A.
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
57 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood
Research
Series Number
CFS project no.13
Project no.4110C017
E-756
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Fire Proofing of Wood - Research
Wood Construction - Fire
Documents
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Development of class C fire retardant non-pressure treated shingles and shakes

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38011
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 1982
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 1982
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood
Shingles
Research
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 38/81-82
65-55-163
E-44
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Shingles - Fireproofing
Fireproofing of wood - Research
Documents
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Development of fire safety design criteria for exterior wall assemblies and finishes : project plan phase 1

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38667
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 1993
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 1993
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Walls
Safety
Design
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 1
3110K038
E-1910
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Building design - Fire hazards
Exterior Walls - Design
Design - Fire Safety
Documents
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Development of fire safety design criteria for exterior wall assemblies and finishes : report on progress

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38652
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 1994
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 1994
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
6 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Walls
Safety
Research
Design
Building construction
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 1
3110K038
E-1879
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
In recent years, a number of well publicized fire incidents have raised serious questions about the levels of fire safety afforded Canadians by current NBCC specifications for fire performance of exterior cladding materials and spatial separation between buildings.
Building construction - Fire research
Exterior Walls - Design - Fire Safety
Documents
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Development of heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42239
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No 9
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Computer fire modelling is an important high-tech tool in fire safety engineering and fire science. The movement towards objective-based building codes means that these models will find application in performance-based fire-safety design of wood structures. Accordingly for more than a decade, fire researchers at Forintek strove to develop heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies exposed to fire. Then, in 2001 Forintek elected to outsource all future development of these models. This project provides funding, direction and oversight for the outside development of these design tools. Canadian officials identified construction of wood-frame buildings in Japan as an important market priority. To aid them in their endeavours, in 2002-2003 Forintek contracted the development of a heat transfer model for exterior walls constructed with exterior expanded polystyrene-foam (EPS) insulation and ceramic-siding rains screens when subjected to standard fire exposures on the outside face. In 2003-2004 Forintek contracted to have further refinements made to that heat transfer model so that users would have the option of selecting either exterior EPS insulation or exterior semi-rigid glass-fibre insulation panels. That work was completed and comparisons between the model’s predictions and the results of full-scale tests show good agreement. A paper describing Forintek’s heat transfer model for exterior walls with exterior insulation and non-combustible rain-screens, and comparisons between the model’s predicted outcomes and the results of full-scale fire tests on such assemblies will be presented later this year at the 8th World Conference on Timber Engineering. In recent years Japanese building regulations were revised to permit construction of wood-frame (combustible) buildings within the high-density urban centres (Fire Protection Zones) of their larger cities if the major loadbearing elements in those buildings met specific requirements for fireproof construction. Those requirements have been dubbed the “one-plus-three” test requirements because for “low-rise” wood-frame apartment buildings and large houses they include exhibiting one-hour of fire-resistance when tested in accordance with ISO 834, and continued fire resistance without structural collapse when the test assembly is maintained under structural load with the fire-test furnace in-place against the side of the assembly for an additional three hours. Again, to assist in promoting markets for Canadian wood products in Japan, in 2003-2004 Forintek commenced modifying its WALL2D heat transfer model so that it would be capable of predicting the thermal response of walls subjected to the fire (thermal) exposures specified in Japan’s one-plus-three test method, parametric, and “real” fire scenarios. In preparation for that work, a Forintek scientist traveled to Japan to gather more information about the “one-plus-three” testing procedures. Later, Forintek contracted the service of Dr H. Takeda to travel to Japan to obtain thermo-physical property data for the gypsum board products commonly used in construction of wood buildings complying with Japanese specifications for fireproof construction. The information obtained from these two trips indicated that the successful completion of revisions to the WALL2D model would be much more difficult and require much more time than had originally been anticipated. With the support of Forintek, one of the students enrolled at Carleton University, Steven Craft, chose as the topic for his PhD thesis the reliability of wood-frame floors in fire. One of the tasks that he is carrying out for his thesis is the development of a heat transfer model for floor assemblies constructed with solid-wood joists. Dr Hadjisophocleous, the Chair in Fire Safety Engineering at the university, and Craft’s thesis advisor, submitted a proposal to Materials Manufacturing Ontario (MMO) which would leverage Forintek’s financial support to Craft and enable Hadjisophocleous to build an entire research program around Craft’s thesis research. MMO accepted the proposal. One of the biggest problems encountered in performance-base fire-safety design of large commercial structures is selecting the proper design or “realistic” fire scenario to be used when modeling fire resistance. For large commercial building with atria, establishing the required fire exposures on the boundaries of the atria from a fire within those tall, large open spaces is a particularly difficult issue. Therefore, in 2003, fire researchers in Australia submitted a proposal to the Australian Research Council (ARC) to study this subject. Forintek will provide some support for the work. All of these activities will continue in 2004-2005.
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
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Development of heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies : 2002-2003 progress

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42193
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
CFS No 9
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Computer fire modelling is one of the most important high-tech tools in fire safety engineering and fire science. The movement towards objective-based building codes means that these models will be essential tools for performance-based fire-safety design of wood structures. Accordingly for more than a decade, fire researchers at Forintek have been striving to develop heat-transfer models (HT models) for wood-frame assemblies exposed to fire. Then, in 2001 Forintek elected to outsource all future development of these models. This project provides funding, direction and oversight for the outside development of these design tools. Because both the Canadian government and the wood industry had identified construction of wood-frame buildings in Japan as a market priority, and the fire performance of exterior wood-frame walls with exterior foam-plastic insulation and ceramic-siding rain screens, a popular Japanese housing design, as one of their biggest hurdles in capturing a larger share of that market, in 2002-2003, efforts were focused on development of a model to predict heat transfer through that specific type of assembly. Using WALL2D, Forintek’s HT model for wood-frame walls with gypsum board on both sides as the foundation, Nortak Software Ltd. was contracted to complete Forintek’s development of a model to predict heat transfer through wood-frame exterior walls subjected on the exterior face to ISO 834 fire exposures. While Forintek researchers knew that the Japan Testing Center for Construction Materials (JTCCM) in Tokyo had carried out fire tests on exterior wood-frame walls with expanded-polystyrene (EPS) exterior insulation and ceramic-siding rain screens, little was known about the outcome of those tests, the pass/fail criteria used in assessing such assemblies, and the problems, if any, that were encountered in carrying out the tests. Also, in ISO 834 tests, the fire gases within test furnaces are under a small positive pressure. The ability, if any, of those furnace pressures to drive hot fire gases through the ventilation/drainage holes in the rain screen and directly into the cavities behind the ceramic siding, and the direction of that gas flow within the cavities were completely unknown. Of greater significance and equal uncertainty was the effect that those conditions might have on the EPS insulation backing upon the cavities. Also, there was a dearth of information in Canada about design and construction practices followed in Japan for these types of walls. Another concern for Forintek was our ability to obtain test data for validation of the HT model once it had been developed. Finally, overriding all other concerns was the willingness of Japanese testing organizations, regulatory officials, manufacturers of building materials, and builders to accept the use of models to predict the fire performance of these types of assemblies. Therefore, Forintek contracted the service of Dr. Hisahiro Takeda to travel to the JTCCM to gather intelligence answering each of these concerns. Development of Foritnek’s HT model for exterior walls with exterior EPS insulation and ceramic-siding rains screens will be completed by September 2003. Forintek will then aid Canadian government and industry officials in exporting Canadian housing technology and Canadian building products to Japan by working with officials at NRCan CANMET in selecting optimum designs for exterior wall assemblies to be used in construction of energy efficient houses in Japan. At the same time, Forintek will work with other industry and governmental officials to promote and market Canadian housing technology and Canadian building products in China, Taiwan and Korea by using the model to demonstrate the fire resistance of exterior wood-frame walls. Finally, Forintek will attempt to work with researchers at the JTCCM to market the model in Japan.
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
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Development of heat transfer models for wood-frame assemblies : 2004-2005 progress

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42307
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
exposed to fire. Fire Mater. 18(x): 297-305. Richardson, L.R. 2004. Fire resistance assemblies - final
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 9
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
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75 records – page 1 of 8.