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Best practices guide to minimize mold growth on wood products from manufacture to end use

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42463
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Gignac, Manon
Yang, D.-Q.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
guide
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Gignac, Manon
Yang, D.-Q.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
guide
Research report
Physical Description
32 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Prevention
Growth
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38
W-2826
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This guide is intended to discuss mold-related issues and to assist the industry in the delivery of clean, mold-free products to the marketplace. Mold continues to be undesirable on wood products and can cause rejection of shipments by the customers and economic losses to the industry. This report provides an historic perspective on mold, defines mold and discusses why it became a major issue in the marketplace and how this relates to wood products. The main factors required for mold growth and expansion are discussed, as are methods of limiting mold growth. The best method of mold control is moisture control, which includes initial drying and keeping wood products dry. Specifically we give best practice guidelines for controlling mold on logs, lumber, plywood/veneers, other composite panel products, wood chips/residues, and for wood products in service (buildings). Lumber is one of the key products of the wood industry and several specific guidelines in regard to mold control for lumber are available and covered in depth. This includes air-drying, kiln-drying, phytosanitary heat treatment, and chemical prophylactic treatment of green lumber. Some circumstances where control of moisture is not feasible will require either chemical treatments or water barriers to prevent mold growth. There is also a special section on lumber packaging and wrapping, and water repellents. Finally, the report reviews existing guidelines for mold cleaning and remediation.
Mould growth
Moulds - Prevention
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Biological control of stain in logs : 2001 field tests

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4479
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2002
Edition
41263
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2002
Edition
41263
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Storage
Stain fungal
Stain
Logs
Series Number
W-1865
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
In summer 2001 we ran one field experiment to test the feasibility of Sylvanex (formerly Cartapip 97) as a biocontrol agent to protect logs from being stained by wild-type bluestain fungi. Freshly felled lodgepole pine logs were spray-treated with Sylvanex, dispersed in water, or with water alone (referred to as non-treated). Sampling of the piles of logs took place after 6 weeks and again after 13 weeks. The bluestained area on discs taken from the logs was measured in the laboratory. The data clearly indicate that Sylvanex can control bluestain in freshly felled lodgepole pine logs if applied immediately after felling to the total log exterior. After six weeks of summer storage, when logs are most vulnerable, Sylvanex-treated logs remained almost spotless compared to heavily stained non-treated logs. After 13 weeks of storage there was moderate stain development in Sylvanex-treated logs but the amount was significantly less than in non-treated logs. The product, and the concept of using albino isolates to control stain, therefore has potential for industrial use. Before Sylvanex is used industrially on a large scale it is recommended that additional studies should investigate whether adjuvants, such as spreaders and stickers, or using higher concentrations of biocontrol agent improve its performance and consistency. In addition the efficacy of the product should be tested on other wood species.
Stains - Fungal - Control - Tests
Logs - Storage
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Biological control of stain in logs : a compilation of research reports

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4483
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Date
May 2002
Edition
41267
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
May 2002
Edition
41267
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Storage
Stain fungal
Stain
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Logs
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service Value-Added Report;2444
W-1880
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Development of bluestain in logs prevents the Canadian forest industry from producing maximum-value products from a considerable portion of the resource every year. The major purpose of this project was to determine the practical and economic feasibility of using an albino stain of a common bluestain fungus Ophiostoma piliferum (Cartapip 97, recently renamed Sylvanex) or equivalent albino fungi to control sapstain in lodgepole pine logs. We also tested the Forintek's eastern laboratory integrated control technology (fungus Gliocladium roseum with alkali). Different activities were planned but as results developed some had to be modified or dropped and others added to the planned work. The various aspects of this work are described in the set of reports that are included in the appendices.
Stains - Fungal - Control - Tests
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Stains - Fungal
Logs - Storage
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Biological control of stain in logs : two field tests in 2000

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4462
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
April 2001
Edition
41246
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
April 2001
Edition
41246
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Storage
Stain fungal
Stain
Logs
Series Number
W-1761
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
We ran two field experiments in summer 2000 to test the feasibility of using two biocontrol agents to protect logs from being stained by wild-type bluestain fungi. Both Cartapip and Gliocladium roseum showed promise to control stain in freshly felled logs for the critical first 12 weeks of storage. Results show that:
Cartapip applied at the recommended concentration significantly reduced the amount of stain in the Alberta trials.
Cartapip concentration at 1/3 of the recommended concentration resulted in stain that was not significantly different from that in the control logs.
Tim-Bor and the integrated control with G. roseum also significantly reduced stain but less than did Cartapip applied at the recommended level.
In the B.C. trials the stain prevention effect of Cartapip appeared to be stronger in discs that had large sapwood areas (available areas). However, no treatment effects were found to be statistically significant. We need to repeat the experiment at least once as consistency must be demonstrated before the biocontrol agent can be used industrially. In our next field studies, we will concentrate on Cartapip. Additional studies could look into optimizing the formula and use of product by testing different concentrations of biocontrol agents, adjuvants (spreaders and stickers), and ways of timing application.
Stains - Fungal - Control - Tests
Logs - Storage
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Biological protection of sawlogs against bluestain : CFS value added research program progress report to March 31, 2000

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4441
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
April 2000
Edition
41224
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2000
Edition
41224
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Stain fungal
Stain
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Series Number
W-1689
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using C97 (Cartapip 97), or an equivalent albino fungi, to control sapstain in lodgepole pine logs.
Stains - Fungal - Control
Pinus contorta Dougl. var latifolia - Stains - Fungal
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Biology and management of bluestain fungi

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4551
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2006
Edition
41344
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2006
Edition
41344
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Stain fungal
Stain
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38;4781
W-2282
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report describes research to determine the major source of bluestain fungi and determine the mechanisms of their dispersion, as well as the biology and weak points of pests that may be exploited to control them.
Stain - Fungal - Control
Fungi - Wood staining
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Biology and management of bluestain fungi

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4579
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2007
Edition
41374
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2007
Edition
41374
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Stain fungal
Stain
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38
W-2398
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report describes research to determine the major source of bluestain fungi and determine the mechanisms of their dispersion, as well as the biology and weak points of pests that may be exploited to control them.
Stain - Fungal - Control
Fungi - Wood staining
Documents
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Biology and management of bluestain fungi

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4594
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2008
Edition
41391
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2008
Edition
41391
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Stain fungal
Stain
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38
W-2521
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The project initially focussed on harvester transmission of staining fungi and insect transmission to logs in the forest and sawmill yard. Both harvesters and insects were confirmed to be major sources of bluestain infection. This work emphasized the importance of insect control measures in mill yards and a new project on mitigating harvester-related bluestain was recommended. Other related projects targeted potential control measures, such as sour-felling (crown drying) to reduce nutrients and moisture, biological control using albino fungi, and inventory control. Biocontrol work continued to be done under this project in 2005. We have assisted with the registration of a biocontrol agent and also examined the feasibility of developing a prototype harvester applicator system in collaboration with UBC mechanical engineering students. This spawned a separate project that looks into development of a spray applicator system on a commercial scale. In February 2004 and August 2005 we examined sources of bluestain in sawmills, such as air, sawdust and machinery. This work showed machinery as a possible mechanism for spreading bluestain from one piece of lumber to another during the milling. As each piece of work was completed, further data gaps were identified.
Stains - Fungal - Control
Documents
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Biology and management of bluestain fungi

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4615
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2009
Edition
41414
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2009
Edition
41414
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Stain fungal
Stain
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38
W-2664
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The objectives of the project are to determine the major source of bluestain fungi and determine the mechanisms of their dispersion, and to determine the biology and weak points of pests that may be expoited to control them.
Stain - Fungal - Control
Documents
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Biology and management of bluestain : updates to the insect-fungi database and literature review on molecular and phylogenetic work

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6005
Author
Dale, Angela
Coelho, A.
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2011
Edition
42461
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Dale, Angela
Coelho, A.
Uzunovic, Adnan
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Edition
42461
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Stain fungal
Stain
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38
W-2824
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Ophiostomatoid fungi can pose serious risks to forest health, forest product value, and forest product exports. These fungi belong to at least two different orders, six teleomorph genera and ten anamorph genera, but share similar characteristics such as transmission by insect vectors and frequent association with tree hosts. Some produce bluestain in the wood causing losses in appearance grade markets, while others are more serious pathogens that can cause disease or kill their host trees and raise phytosanitary concerns in the global market place. In an effort to keep up with the rapidly advancing taxonomic changes and knowledge gains within these fungal groups, especially in regards to their associations with insect vectors, an INSECT-FUNGI database was created in 2005 to maintain literature on these fungi as well as to facilitate rapid data mining within the collected literature in order to explore feasible ways of detecting, monitoring and controlling these fungi. In addition, in 2008 an extensive literature review looked at the DNA-based tools used to identify and taxonomically place species within these groups. That work also reviewed the latest changes in the taxonomy of Ophiostomatoid fungi. In 2009, updates were made to the database as well as to the 2008 literature review. In addition, DNA-based identification decision making trees were created to give users tools to help identify mould and staining agents. The objectives of this report were to summarize the activities and updates in regards to the Insect-Fungi database, and to review the latest literature and news in regards to taxonomy, DNA-based identification, and other relevant information pertaining to Ophiostomatoid fungi. In addition we also included an update of a few non-ophiostomatoid fungi that cause bluestain, for example Diplodia and Lasiodiplodia. Numerous new associations between insects, hosts and ophiostomatoid fungi have been discovered in the last three years. Thirty one new species of Ophiostoma were described in 2010 and several more are in the process of being described. There are currently four genera within Ophiostomatales; however, seven more are expected to be officially accepted in the near future. In addition to the ITS region of the ribosomal DNA, more research groups are routinely utilizing the ß-tubulin gene for describing new species and species complexes. A group at UBC completed sequencing the genome of Grosmannia clavigera and described mechanisms by which this fungus can detoxify host defence compounds, as well as use host terpenoids as a carbon source giving important insights into the relationships between fungus, beetle and tree.
Stains - Fungal
Documents
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44 records – page 1 of 5.