Skip header and navigation

61 records – page 1 of 7.

Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: acoustic performance of innovative composite wood stud partition walls

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49838
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Deng, James
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Deng, James
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Vibration
Design
Walls
Studs
Language
English
Abstract
Airborne sound insulation performance of wall assemblies is a critical aspect which is directly associated with the comfort level of the occupants, which in turn affects the market acceptance.
Documents
Less detail

Biotechnology to improve mould, stain and decay resistance of OSB

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42231
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Wan, Hui
Date
March 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Wan, Hui
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
46 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Materials
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 31
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Oriented strand board (OSB) is widely used in house construction in North America. In Canada, OSB panels are commonly made of aspen strands and are susceptible to mould and decay when they get wet. Building envelope failures due to mould, decay or poor construction practices can negatively impact the image of wood. This can lead to product substitution that in turn can affect the wood industry’s overall competitiveness. To ensure durability of OSB panels, the most important consideration is the use of mould- and decay-resistant panels to prevent fungal attack. Using low environmental impact technology to improve the durability of OSB products could have market-related advantages over using chemical protection products. This project aimed to develop technologies for protecting OSB raw materials from biodegradation and to explore biological pre- or post-treatments to increase the durability of panels so they would better resist mould, stain and decay. The project was divided into three parts. Part one involved developing a biological technology to protect OSB raw materials from biodegradation. In this part, aspen, red maple and yellow birch trees, which are commonly used to make OSB in Canada, were felled in May and cut into 4-foot logs. These logs were then equally divided into two groups (16 logs each) with one group keeping its bark and the other having it removed. These debarked and “bark-on” logs were further divided into two groups, each containing 8 logs. One group of logs was treated with a bioprotectant and another group served as a control. The treated and untreated logs were stored separately in Forintek’s yard. Two inspections were conducted, one at the end of the growth season (in October after a 5-month storage period) and the other after one year. During each inspection, four logs from each test group were examined for fungal degradation (mould, stain and decay), and then cut into strands to be used for manufacturing panels. The panels’ physical and mechanical properties and mould resistance were evaluated. The second part involved developing a biological pre- or post-treatment technology by using naturally resistant wood species to increase the durability of panels so they would better resist mould, stain and decay. In this part, a series of tests were conducted using various wood species. These tests included a) determining the antifungal properties of bark from various wood species; b) using white cedar to improve panel durability; c) optimizing manufacturing conditions for producing durable panels with white cedar; d) using other wood species to produce mould-resistant panels; and e) post-treating panels with extracts of durable wood species. The third part consists of developing a biological pre- or post-treatment technology by using fungal antagonists to increase the durability of panels against mould, stain and decay. This part will be conducted in the 2004-2005 fiscal year, and results will be included in next year’s report. The results of the first part on the protection of raw materials showed that all untreated logs, with or without bark, were seriously degraded by moulds, stain and decay fungi after a summer storage period of five months. The logs with bark were more degraded than the debarked logs, and the log ends were more degraded than the middle sections. After summer storage, 55% to 83% of the wood was degraded in untreated logs. The biological treatment was effective, only 4% to 16% of the wood in treated logs was affected by various fungi after a five-month storage period. Furthermore, the biological treatment was more effective on logs without bark than logs with bark, and more effective on yellow birch and aspen than on red maple. After one year in storage, the total infection rates of untreated logs ranged from 68% to 91%, whereas the rate for biologically treated logs ranged from 27% to 49%. Among these treated logs, the logs ends were degraded from 31% to 62%, whereas the middle sections were degraded from 7% to 26%. Strands cut from untreated logs contained 50% to 75% of grey or blue stained strands, whereas those cut from biologically treated logs contained 10% to 25% of such strands. Panels made using biologically treated logs had the lowest TS and WA values compared with panels made using fresh-cut logs and untreated stored logs. The other physical and mechanical properties of the various panels made for this test were comparable. The antifungal properties of bark from six wood species (aspen, red maple, yellow birch, balsam fir, white spruce and white cedar) were investigated in the second part of this research project. Based on the colony growth rate of moulds, stain and decay fungi on bark-extract-agar media, white spruce bark was the best at inhibiting growth of these fungi, followed by red maple bark. White cedar and balsam fir bark somewhat inhibited certain fungi tested. Aspen and yellow birch bark did little or nothing at all to inhibit fungal growth. The research also showed that the white cedar heartwood-extract-agar medium not only inhibited decay fungi growth, but also inhibited the growth of moulds and staining fungi. The bark-extract-agar medium of this wood species was less effective in inhibiting fungal growth than the heartwood was. Three-layer panels made using white cedar heartwood strands in the face layers and aspen strands in the core layer at a ratio of 25:0:25 were mould and decay resistant, but the panels “blew” easily during manufacturing and their mechanical properties were not satisfying. The overall mould infection rate on white cedar heartwood-faced panels was 0.8, which indicated that the panel was mould resistant. White spruce heartwood-faced panels were highly mould resistant and moderately decay resistant. The overall mould infection rate on white spruce heartwood-faced panels was only 0.2 after 8 weeks of exposure to high humidity environmental conditions. In addition to being mould resistant, white spruce heartwood-faced aspen panels also had better IB, MOR and MOE properties, compared with aspen panels. The panels with black spruce in surface layer had mechanical and mould-resistance properties that were similar to those with white spruce in surface. The panels with surface layer of Eastern larch heartwood were non-resistant to moulds and slightly resistant to decay, but they had better IB, TS and WA properties compared with the other types of panels. The overall mould infection rate on the panel with surface layer of Eastern larch heartwood was 3.7, which was similar to the rate for aspen control panels. Aspen panels (serving as control panels) were seriously affected by moulds with overall mould infection rates ranging from 3.8 to 4.9. Aspen panels with surface layer from whole-wood strands (using both sapwood and heartwood) from white cedar, in a ratio of 25:50:25 and pressed at 220°C for 150 seconds, were well bonded and had IB, TS, WA and MOE values that were similar to those of aspen control panel, but with a higher MOR. All the panels’ properties met the requirements of the standard. This type of panel also was the least infected by moulds, especially in the face layers which rated a 0.2. The panel sides were moderately infected, rating a 2.6, this occurring mostly in the middle layer of aspen strands. The overall rate of this type of panel was 1.0, which indicated that the panels were resistant to mould infection. This type of panel was also highly resistant to brown rot and moderately resistant to white rot. Panels made of steam-treated white cedar whole-wood strands and aspen strands at a ratio of 3:7 based on oven-dry weight also had low infection rates: the average face infection rate was 1.2; the side infection was 2.4 and the overall rate was 1.6. Compared with aspen panels, this type of panel also had high MOR and MOE values and low TS and WA values. In the case of white cedar whole-wood strands faced aspen panels, when the pressing time was increased from 160 seconds to 180 seconds at 200°C, the panels’ IB strength and MOE increased whereas the panels’ TS, WA and MOR decreased. By increasing the pressing temperature from 200°C to 240°C and pressing for 160 seconds, the panels’ IB strength, MOR and MOE increased and the panels’ TS and WA decreased sharply. At a pressing temperature of 240°C and a pressing time of 180 seconds, the panels’ IB strength, MOR and MOE increased significantly and the panels’ TS and WA decreased significantly. These data showed that aspen panels with surface layer from white cedar whole strands at a ratio of 25:50:25 and pressed at 240°C for 180 seconds had the best mechanical and physical properties. All panel samples were slightly infected by moulds on the faces. A fair amount of mould occurred on the sides of panels pressed at 200°C for 160 seconds and 180 seconds and those pressed at 240°C for 180 seconds. The panels pressed at 240°C for 160 seconds were the least infected by mould (with an infection rate of 0.3). Panels pressed at 200°C had a white-yellowish colour, whereas those pressed at 240°C were yellow-brownish and darker than those pressed at 200°C. Panels pressed at 200°C for 160 or 180 seconds and those pressed at 240°C for 160 seconds were highly decay resistant, especially to brown rot. The decay resistance of panels pressed at 240°C for 180 seconds was lower compared with the other panels. Compared with aspen panels, panels with surface layer from steam-treated white cedar strands and aspen strands at a ratio of 7:3 based on oven-dry weight had higher TS, WA, MOR and MOE values and a similar IB value. Panels with surface layer from steam-treated white cedar strands and aspen strands at a ratio of 4:6 based on oven-dry weight had the highest IB value. A reduction in mould and decay resistance corresponded to a reduction in the proportion of white cedar strands in the face layers. The overall mould growth rate was 1.27 on panels with surface layer from steam-treated white cedar strands and aspen strands at a ratio of 4:6, 0.6 on panels with surface layer from steam-treated white cedar strands and aspen strands at a ratio of 7:3, and 0.4 on panels faced with 100% white cedar whole strands, respectively. Panels made from 100% white cedar whole-wood strands or a mixture of whole-wood strands of white cedar and aspen (50:50) in the core layer were “blown” after pressing. Panels made from a mixture of white cedar and aspen strands at a ratio of 25:75 in the core layer and aspen strands in the face layers had superior IB, MOR and MOE values than other panels. However, their TS and WA values were also higher than those of white cedar-faced panels. Panels made from a mixture of white cedar and aspen strands at a ratio of 25:75 in the core layer and white cedar strands in the face layers had the worst physical and mechanical properties among all the panels made for this test. The tests results for mould showed that panels made with a mixture of white cedar and aspen strands at a ratio of 25:75 in the core layer and aspen strands in the face layers ware seriously attacked by moulds and had an overall mould growth rate of 4.2. No mould infection was found on panels made from 100% white cedar strands. Panels made from a strand mixture of white cedar (50%) and aspen (50%) in the core layer and white cedar strands in the face layers had little mould infection. The overall mould growth rate on this type of panel was 0.2. Compared with the control aspen panels, aspen panels with surface layer from white cedar whole-wood strands at a ratio of 15:70:15 had similar IB and TS values, a lower WA value and higher MOR and MOE values. When the white cedar strand proportion in the face layer was increased from 15% to 25%, the panels’ IB strength and WA decreased, but their MOR and MOE values increased. Panels with surface layer from white cedar strands at a ratio of 15:70:15 had little infection from moulds on the face and bottom layers, but had an increased infection rate on all four sides. The average overall infection rate of this type of panel was 0.5. When the white cedar in the panels’ face layer was increased from 15% to 25%, the average infection rate on the panels’ faces was still 0.1, but the infection rate of the panels’ sides dropped from 1.2 to 1.0. The overall rate was 0.4. In terms of decay resistance, panels with surface layer from 25% white cedar strands performed better than those with surface layer from 15% white cedar.
Composite materials - Durability
Biotechnology
Documents
Less detail

Biotechnology to improve mould, stain and decay resistance of OSB

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42285
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Wan, Hui
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Wan, Hui
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
75 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Materials
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 31
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
This project aimed to develop technologies for protecting OSB raw materials from biodegradation and to explore biological pre- or post-treatments to increase the durability of panels so they would better resist mould, stain and decay. The project was conducted in five parts. Part one involved developing a biological technology to protect OSB raw materials from biodegradation. The results of this part of the work showed that all untreated logs, with or without bark, were seriously degraded by moulds, stain and decay fungi after a summer storage period of five months. The logs with bark were more degraded than the debarked logs, and the log ends were more degraded than the middle sections. After summer storage, 55% to 83% of the wood was degraded in untreated logs. The biological treatment was effective, only 4% to 16% of the wood in treated logs was infected by various fungi after a five-month storage period. Furthermore, the biological treatment was more effective on logs without bark than logs with bark, and more effective on yellow birch and aspen than on red maple. After one year in storage, the total infection rates of untreated logs ranged from 68% to 91%, whereas the rate for biologically treated logs ranged from 27% to 49%. Strands cut from untreated logs contained 50% to 75% of grey or blue stained strands, whereas those cut from biologically treated logs contained 10% to 25% of such strands. Panels made using biologically treated logs had the lowest thickness swelling (TS) and water absorption (WA) values compared with panels made using fresh-cut logs and untreated stored logs. The other physical and mechanical properties of the various panels made for this test were comparable. For the mould resistance, all panels made from fungal treated logs had better mould resistance than those made from freshly cut and untreated logs. Panels made of strands cut from fungal treated debarked logs had better mould resistance than the panels made from fungal treated bark-on logs. The second part of the research consisted of investigating antifungal properties of barks from various wood species. In this part, antifungal properties of barks from 6 wood species: aspen, red maple, yellow birch, balsam fir, white spruce and white cedar were screened in a laboratory test against moulds, staining fungi, white-rot and brown-rot fungi. Based on the colony growth rate of moulds, stain and decay fungi on bark-extract-agar media, white spruce bark was the best at inhibiting growth of these fungi, followed by red maple bark. White cedar and balsam fir bark somewhat inhibited certain fungi tested. Aspen and yellow birch bark did little or nothing at all to inhibit fungal growth. The third part involved developing a biological treatment technology by using naturally resistant wood species to increase the durability of panels so they would better resist mould, stain and decay. In this part, a series of tests were conducted using various wood species. These tests included a) using white cedar to improve panel durability; b) optimizing manufacturing conditions for producing durable panels with white cedar; and c) using other wood species to produce mould-resistant panels. The results showed that three-layer panels made using white cedar strands in the face layers and aspen strands in the core layer at different ratios were mould and decay resistant. White spruce heartwood-faced panels were highly mould resistant and moderately decay resistant. In addition to being mould resistant, white spruce heartwood-faced aspen panels also had better internal bond (IB), modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) properties, compared with aspen panels. The panels with black spruce in surface layer had mechanical and mould-resistance properties that were similar to those with white spruce in surface. The panels with surface layer of Eastern larch heartwood were non-resistant to moulds and slightly resistant to decay, but they had better IB, TS and WA properties compared with the other types of panels. The fourth part of the research consisted of developing a biological treatment technology by using fungal antagonists to increase the durability of panels against mould, stain and decay. In this part, two major tests were conducted using various fungal species. They were: a) treating wood strands with three antagonistic fungi, Gliocladium roseum, Phaeotheca dimorphospora and Ceratocystis resinifera, to increase OSB panel durability; and b) treating wood strands with a lignin-degrading fungus, Coriolus hirsutus, to reduce OSB resin usage. The results of this part of the work showed that all of the 4 fungal species used grew well on aspen strands in four weeks, and strands in all treatments had normal wood color after incubation. For IB property, panels made of fungal treated strands were better or similar to the control panels. Panels made of fungal treated strands had higher TS and WA values than untreated control panels. For mechanical properties, panels made of fungal treated strands had a slight lower dry MOR and higher wet MOR than control panels. For mould resistance, panels made of fungal treated strands were infected by moulds one week later than the untreated control panels, and reduction of mould infection rates was detected on fungal treated panels within 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, all panels, treated or untreated, were seriously infected by moulds. Reducing resin usage in fungal treated panels did not affect panel density. Compared with untreated control panels, the IB property of panels made of fungal treated strands was slightly increased by using normal dosage of resin or a reduced dosage by 15%, but slightly decreased with a resin reduction by 30%. There was a negative linear correlation of the panel TS and WA properties with resin reduction by using fungal treated strands. For the mechanical properties, panels made of fungal treated strands had lower dry MOR and MOE values, but higher wet MOR values (except for a resin reduction of 30%) than panels made of untreated strands. The fifth part involved protecting OSB against mould and decay by post-treatment of panels with natural extracts from durable wood species and from fungal antagonists. In this part, three tests were conducted using extracts of white cedar heartwood and extracts of a fungal antagonist. These tests were: a) screening antifungal properties of natural extracts against mould and decay fungi; b) post-treating OSB panels with white cedar heartwood extracts and finishing coats; and c) post-treating OSB panels with fungal metabolites. The results of this part of the work showed that the mycelial growth of all fungi tested (moulds, staining fungi, white-rot and brown-rot fungi) was inhibited by the extracts of white cedar heartwood and extracts of the fungal antagonist, P. dimorphospora, on agar plates. Panel samples dipped with the cedar extracts got slight mould growth on the 2 faces and moderate mould growth on the 4 sides, whereas the panel samples dip-treated with the fungal extracts got the minimal mould infection among the panels tested. The results of the mould test on the post-treated panels with extracts of white cedar heartwood and three coating products showed that slight or no mould growth was detected on any sample dip-treated with the extracts and then brushed with finishing coats. The decay test showed that most post-treated samples had less weight losses than untreated control samples.
Composite materials - Durability
Biotechnology
Documents
Less detail

Characterization of glue penetration and its influence on wood failure and bond quality in structural wood product applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42391
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Date
July 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada - Canadian Forest Service
Date
July 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
116 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Phenols
Penetration
Glue
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 53
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Characterization of Glue Penetration and Its Influence on Wood Failure and Bond Quality in Structural Wood Product Applications
Glue - Penetration
Glue, Phenolic
Documents
Less detail

Development of bio-modified of chitosan-based adhesives for wood composites

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5798
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Yang, D.-Q.
Zhang, Yaolin
Feng, Martin
Huang, Z.
He, G.
Date
February 2016
Edition
40114
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Yang, D.-Q.
Zhang, Yaolin
Feng, Martin
Huang, Z.
He, G.
Date
February 2016
Edition
40114
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Adhesives
Environment
Wood composites
Series Number
Transformative Technologies - Development of "Green" Wood Adhesives for Wood Composite Products
Project no.301006168
E-4956
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Chitosan is an amino polysaccharide obtained from the deacetylation of chitin, which is naturally occurring in the shells of a large number of marine crustaceans. Chitosan is soluble in weakly acidic aqueous solutions and possesses adhesive properties. Chitosan has received much attention for medical and industrial applications; however, only limited studies have been conducted on the application of chitosan as a wood adhesive, because its bonding properties on wood are poor. To improve the adhesive quality of chitosan resin, an innovative study on chitosan adhesives has been conducted to use selected fungal species to modify chitosan and improve its bonding properties, to synthesize non-formaldehyde resins with the fungus-modified chitosan, and to enhance urea-formaldehyde (UF) and phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin performance with the fungus-modified chitosan. The bonding properties of wood composites made with these chitosan-based green wood adhesives were significantly improved, in terms of lap-shear strength. Unmodified chitosan solution was not compatible with ammonium lignosulfonate, liquid PF resin, soybean resin, powder PF resin, or soybean flour, but was compatible with UF resin, polyvinyl acetate (PVA) resin, and phenol. With the addition of chitosan in UF and PVA resins, both the dry and wet shear strengths of plywood panels were improved, compared with those of panels bonded with the control UF and PVA resins, i.e. without chitosan. A number of chitosan and chitosan-reinforced UF resins were prepared as a binder for particleboard panel manufacturing. Six (6) types of particleboard panels with different levels of resin loadings and press conditions were manufactured. The resulting boards were tested to evaluate the bond quality of the chitosan and chitosan-reinforced UF resins. The test results showed that particleboard panels with good visual quality could be produced with all formulations of chitosan-UF adhesives, even with resin systems made with 1% of chitosan resin only. All chitosan resins used alone or added to UF resins yielded panels with better internal bond (IB) strength than those made with the UF control resin. The panels made with 1% chitosan resin plus 66% UF resin in a 1:1 ratio yielded panels with the highest IB strength and the best overall mechanical properties.
Documents
Less detail

Development of chitosan-based adhesives for wood composites

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5772
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Zhang, Yaolin
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Feng, Martin
Date
March 2013
Edition
39730
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Yang, D.-Q.
Zhang, Yaolin
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Feng, Martin
Date
March 2013
Edition
39730
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
37 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Test methods
Materials
Adhesives
Series Number
Transformative Technologies Program
Project No. TT 3.4.10
301006168
E-4819
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Chitosan is an amino polysaccharide deacetylated from chitin, which is naturally occurring in large amount in shells of marine crustaceans. Chitosan is soluble in weakly acidic aqueous solutions and possesses an adhesive property. Chitosan has received much attention for medical and industrial applications; however, only limited studies have been conducted on the application of chitosan as a wood adhesive because of its bonding properties on wood are poor. To improve the adhesive quality of chitosan resin, an innovative study on chitosan adhesives has been conducted to use selected fungal species to modify chitosan and improve its bonding property, to synthesize non-formaldehyde resin with the fungus-modified chitosan and to prepare UF and PF resins enhanced with the fungal modified chitosan. Bonding properties of wood composites made with these chitosan-based green wood adhesives in terms of lap-shear strength were significantly improved in this study. Unmodified chitosan solution was not compatible with ammonium lignosulfonate liquid, liquid PF resin, soybean resin, PF powder, or soybean flour, but was compatible with UF resin (liquid), PVA resin, or phenol. With addition of chitosan in UF and PVA resins, both dry and wet shear strengths of plywood panels were improved comparing with the use of the control UF and PVA resins without chitosan. A number of chitosan and chitosan-reinforced UF resins as binder for particleboard manufacturing have been prepared. Six (6) types of particleboards with different levels of resin loadings and press conditions were manufactured and evaluated for the bond quality of chitosan and chitosan-reinforced UF resins. The results showed that all formulations of chitosan-UF adhesives were able to produce particleboards with nice appearance, even those made of only with 1% of chitosan resin alone. All chitosan resins, alone or added to UF resins, had a better IB strength than UF control resin. The panels made of 1% of chitosan resin plus 66% of UF resin in a 1:1 ratio had the highest IB strength.
CHITOSAN
Adhesives - Composite materials
Documents
Less detail

Development of fire retardant composite panels

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39220
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Resistance
Panels
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18
5764
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Panels - Fire resistance
Documents
Less detail

Development of fire retardant composite panels. Part I. Fire-performance requirements for composite wood products and standard fire tests for demonstrating compliance with those requirements - Literature review

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39078
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
January 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
January 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Materials
Series Number
CFS Progress report No. 18
5764
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood belongs to the natural bio-composites of plant origin containing cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and other compounds. When exposed to fire or any other high intensity heat sources, wood, being a natural polymer, is subject to thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) and combustion depending on the environmental conditions. Combustion accompanied by heat release and chemiluminescence occurs when wood is in direct contact with air and with a physical, chemical or microbiological stimulus associated with heat release. There are increasing concerns about the fire performance of engineered wood products (EWP). Eventually, these concerns may likely extend to wood composite products such as oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium density fiberboard (MDF), and high density fiberboard (HDF) panels. From environmental and safety points of view, wood composite panels, like structural wood products, should have certain fire retardant properties and it is believed this fire issue will get more attention in the near future through environmental regulation development and end-use customers’ requirements. A Canadian Forest Service (CFS) project in the Composites Program, entitled “Development of Fire Retardant Composite Panels (Project No. 5764),” was initiated in 2007. The aim of the project is to develop fire retardant OSB panel and low-density fiberboard (FB) through modification of wood furnish and/or adhesives with fire retardants and nano materials, and panel surface coating with fire retardant coatings and paints for improving fire performance. As part of the project deliverables, this report presents a review of the current literature on identifying fire performance requirements in Canada and the United States for wood and wood-based building products, OSB, HB, FB, low-density FB panels suitable for use as interior ceiling finish, and other composite wood products used in construction of buildings, and the standard fire tests specified in Canada and the United States for demonstrating compliance with those requirements. The literature review was conducted by Mr. Leslie R. Richardson, retired senior research scientist and Group Leader of Building Systems – Fire Program of FPInnovations - Forintek Division. It is believed that this literature review will be invaluable as a guide for acquiring information on fire performance requirements and standard fire test methods for wood and composite wood products. The full literature review is available in Appendix I.
Composite materials
Fire retardants
Documents
Less detail

Development of fire retardant composite panels. Part III. Small-scale fire testing methods for R&D use as alternatives to fire test standards specified in building codes : literature review

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39109
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Panels
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18
5764
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood belongs to the natural bio-composites of plant origin containing cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and other compounds. When exposed to fire or any other high intensity heat sources, wood, being a natural polymer, is subject to thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) and combustion depending on the environmental conditions. Combustion accompanied by heat release and chemiluminescence occurs when wood is in direct contact with air and with a physical, chemical or microbiological stimulus associated with heat release. There are increasing concerns about the fire performance of engineered wood products (EWP) and wood composite products such as oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium density fiberboard (MDF) and high density fiberboard (HDF) panels. Wood composite panels, like structural wood products, should have certain fire retardant properties with respect to both safety and the environment. It is believed that this issue will get more attention in the near future as environmental regulations are developed and the requirements of end-users change. A Canadian Forest Service (CFS) project in the Composites Program, entitled “Development of Fire Retardant Composite Panels (Project No. 5764),” was initiated in 2007. The aim of the project is to develop fire retardant OSB panel and low-density fiberboard (FB) through the modification of wood furnish and/or adhesives using fire retardants and nano materials, and to improve the fire performance of panel surface coatings by using fire retardant coatings and paints. As part of the project deliverables, a series of literature reviews on different aspects of fire performance for wood and composite wood products has been conducted. So far, two literature review reports have been issued: Part I. Fire-Performance Requirements for Composite Wood Products and Standard Fire Tests for Demonstrating Compliance with those Requirements - Literature Review and Part II. Proprietary Fire Retardant Treated Wood and Composite Wood Products - Literature Review. In this current report (Part III), the literature review was focused on describing a number of small-scale fire tests that can be used for research and development purposes as alternatives to the standard fire tests referenced in building codes in Canada and the United States. The literature review was conducted by Mr. Leslie R. Richardson, retired senior research scientist and Group Leader of Building Systems – Fire Program of FPInnovations – Forintek Division. It is believed that this literature review will be an invaluable guide for acquiring information on fire performance requirements and standard fire test methods for wood and composite wood products. The full literature review is available in Appendix.
Fire retardants
Composite products
Panels
Documents
Less detail

Development of fire retardant composite panels. Part II. Proprietary fire retardant treated wood and composite wood products : literature review

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39110
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
73 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Panels
Materials
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18
5764
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood belongs to the natural bio-composites of plant origin containing cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and other compounds. When exposed to fire or any other high intensity heat sources, wood, being a natural polymer, is subject to thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) and combustion depending on the environmental conditions. Combustion accompanied by heat release and chemiluminescence occurs when wood is in direct contact with air and with a physical, chemical or microbiological stimulus associated with heat release. There are increasing concerns about the fire performance of engineered wood products (EWP) and wood composite products such as oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium density fiberboard (MDF) and high density fiberboard (HDF) panels. Wood composite panels, like structural wood products, should have certain fire retardant properties with respect to both safety and the environment. It is believed that this issue will get more attention in the near future as environmental regulations are developed and the requirements of end-users change. A Canadian Forest Service (CFS) project in the Composites Program, entitled “Development of Fire Retardant Composite Panels (Project No. 5764),” was initiated in 2007. The aim of the project is to develop fire retardant OSB panel and low-density fiberboard (FB) through modification of wood furnish and/or adhesives using fire retardants and nano materials, and to improve the fire performance of panel surface coatings by using fire retardant coatings and paints. As part of the project deliverables, this report presents a review of the current literature focused on the identification of proprietary fire retardant-treated wood and wood-based products, plywood, oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard, hardboard and fiberboard, low-density fiberboard panels suitable for use as interior ceiling finish, and other composite wood products used in construction of buildings, and the identification of potential new manufacturing processes for such products. The literature review was conducted by Mr. Leslie R. Richardson, retired senior research scientist and Group Leader of Building Systems – Fire Program of FPInnovations - Forintek Division. It is believed that this literature review will be an invaluable guide for acquiring information on fire performance requirements and standard fire test methods for wood and composite wood products. The full literature review is available in Appendix.
Fire retardants
Composite materials
Panels
Documents
Less detail

61 records – page 1 of 7.