Skip header and navigation

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Caractéristiques et utilisation du bois des clones de peupliers hybrides

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5041
Author
Chauret, Gilles
Koubaa, Ahmed
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
April 1999
Edition
41885
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Chauret, Gilles
Koubaa, Ahmed
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
April 1999
Edition
41885
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
53 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood structure
Wood
Populus
Hybrid
Series Number
E-3299
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Hybrid poplar - Wood structure
Documents
Less detail

Development of value-added products from BC low-quality wood resource using nano-based technology literature review

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5727
Author
Cai, X.
Akhtar, A.
Feng, Martin
Wan, Hui
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
March 1909
Edition
39278
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Cai, X.
Akhtar, A.
Feng, Martin
Wan, Hui
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment.
Date
March 1909
Edition
39278
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
22 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
British Columbia
Research
Glue
Series Number
W-2770
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A literature review was conducted to identify potentially effective nano-based technology for improving wood attributes in order to develop competitive specialty wood products. The review covered both conventional chemical treatment methods and nano-based methods. Traditional chemical treatments have shown to be effective in improving wood hardness, dimensional stability, stiffness, fire resistance, UV resistance, biological resistance and aesthetic appeal. However, nanotechnology offers new opportunities for further improving wood product attributes due to some very unique and desirable properties of chemical materials in the form of particles in nano scale. The advantages of nanotechnology appear to be particularly obvious when applied to create polymer nanocomposites such as wood coatings. Polymer nanocomposites consist of a continuous polymer matrix which contains inorganic particles of a size below approximately 100 nm at least in one dimension. Due to the material nature of solid wood products, creating a continuous polymer matrix with effective inorganic nanoparticles inside wood cells and lumens would be very difficult. The most promising areas of applying nanotechnology to create improvement opportunities would be wood coatings and wood adhesives. It is recommended that research be carried out to explore the potential of nanotechnology in wood coatings and adhesives and their applications in B.C. wood species and wood products.
Finishing
Glue - Research
Nanotechnology
Documents
Less detail

Effects of commercial thinning on tree and wood characteristics, product recovery and product quality in plantation-grown white spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5729
Author
Tong, Q.J.
Tanguay, F.
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
March 2010
Edition
39282
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Tong, Q.J.
Tanguay, F.
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
March 2010
Edition
39282
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
34 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Thinning
Pinus
Spruce
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 31
E-4612
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The objectives of the research project is to examine the short term (5 years) response of commercial thinning on tree growth, wood characteristics and product quality and value in a white spruce plantation located in Northeastern Ontario. While mechanized commercial thinning just recently became a more prevalent silvicultural prescription in the softwood forests and plantations of Eastern Canada, little information is available on the effects of intensive silviculture on tree growth and concurrent changes in wood properties. In 1969, the study site was planted with bareroot white spruce seedlings at a spacing of feet. In 2003, when the plantation was 34 years old, a mechanical commercial thinning was conducted in a portion of the stand, and permanent sampling plots were established in both the control area and the thinned area. The thinning trails were 18 m apart and 5-6 m wide, representing approximately 30% of tree removal. At the time of thinning, the stand density was 2700 trees per hectare, of which approximately 60% were white spruce and the rest aspen, balsam fir and black spruce. Five years later in 2008, sample trees were collected from each tree DBH class in the thinned area besides the permanent plots. Trees representing the control area (no thinning) were sampled from the buffer area of the thinning to maintain the integrity of the control area. The buffer area was a 15-20-m-wide strip, and trees were sampled in the middle of the strip and sampling was avoided in places where the strip was narrow (<18 m). The middle of the buffer area should represent the growth condition of the control area. A total of 56 trees covering 10 – 22 cm DBH classes was sampled and bucked into 2.5-m (8-foot) long logs. Lumber conversion was carried out with a portable sawmill. After kiln drying and planing, each piece of lumber was visually graded and tested in static bending to determine its lumber stiffness (MOE) and strength (MOR). Based on the sample trees, the impact of commercial thinning was evaluated at both the DBH class and stand levels. White spruce responded moderately to commercial thinning 5 years after the treatment, in terms of individual tree growth. The average tree diameter increased from 13.1 cm in the control to 14.1 cm in the thinning, which represent about a 7% difference following the thinning. Merchantable stem volume per tree increased from 106.1 dm3 in the control to 125.1 dm3 in the thinned area, which is about 18% gain. No differences were observed in lumber volume, value and dimension recoveries between the control and thinned areas 5 years after commercial thinning. For the sample trees, the Select Structural lumber grade recovery was slightly higher for the thinned area (29.1%) than for the control area (25.4%). Similar trend was observed for the No.2 & Better grade recovery. At the stand level, the Select Structural grade recovery and the No.2 & Better grade recovery were comparable between the two treatments. No differences were found in lumber stiffness and strength between the control and thinned area. The lumber modulus of elasticity (MOE) was 7.38 GPa and 6.92 GPa and the modulus of rupture (MOR) 35.8 MPa and 34.9 MPa in the control and thinned area, respectively. In conclusion, based on this study, commercial thinning showed moderately positive effect on individual tree growth, however, no considerable difference in wood properties, lumber recovery and lumber quality was found between the control and thinning treatment 5 years after the commercial thinning. The effects of commercial thinning on tree and wood characteristics, lumber recovery, lumber quality, and economic return should be examined over a longer period of time.
Thinning
Spruce
Documents
Less detail

Effects of thinning on tree and wood characteristics, product recovery and financial returns in spruces

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39224
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood quality
Wood
Thinning
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 31
4008
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Thinning
Recovery
Wood quality
Documents
Less detail

Effects of thinning on tree and wood characteristics, products recovery and financial returns in spruces

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39016
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood quality
Wood
Thinning
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Series Number
CFS Simple Progress Report No. 31
4008
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Thinning
Wood quality
Recovery
Documents
Less detail

Evaluation of wood quality in jack pine family tests

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41717
Author
Chui, Y.H.
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Date
April 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Chui, Y.H.
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Contributor
New Brunswick. Department of Natural Resources and Energy. Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management (Available from)
Date
April 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood quality
Wood density
Wood
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Pinus
Location
Fredericton, New Brunswick
Language
English
Abstract
Wood Density
Wood quality
Heritability
Jack pine
Documents
Less detail

Impact of initial spacing on tree and wood characteristics, product quality and value recovery in black spruce (Picea mariana)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42023
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Chauret, Gilles
Date
March 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Chauret, Gilles
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
47 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Value added
Pinus
Spruce
Spacing
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Picea
Black spruce
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 35
E-3527
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
This study examined the impact of initial spacing on various tree and wood characteristics, product quality and value recovery in black spruce. The study was based on the oldest initial spacing trial established in 1950 near Thunder Bay, Ontario. In 1998, all the trees in the trial were measured and sample trees were collected from 4 different spacings (3086, 2500, 2066, 1372 trees/ha). For each spacing, 6 trees per DBH class were selected to cover all DBH classes in 2-cm interval. For each sample tree, major tree characteristics were measured: 1) total tree height, tree height up to 5 cm diameter top, tree height up to 9.01 cm diameter top (10cm DBH class), 2) DBH and stem diameter from the stump to the top at 1-m interval, 3) live crown width and length, and 4) average diameter of the 5 largest branches. Based on these measurements, other tree characteristics were calculated: 1) stem volume, 2) stem taper, and 3) length of the log without live crown. Each sample tree was bucked to 8-foot-long logs for lumber conversion. From the top of each log, a 5-cm-thick disc was removed for the evaluation of wood characteristics. Lumber conversion was carried out in a way which allows to keep track of the provenance of each piece of lumber. Logs from each spacing were processed separately so that chip samples could be collected for the evaluation of chip quality and pulping properties. Each piece of lumber was visually graded both before and after drying. In-grading tests were also performed to determine lumber strength and stiffness. Based on the sample trees, impact of initial spacing was evaluated first at the diameter class level and then at the stand level. Finally, a cost/benefit analysis was made for the 4 spacings. In addition, special attention was paid on the impact of initial spacing on lumber strength and stiffness. Mechanical properties of plantation-grown black spruce lumber were also compared to those of black spruce from natural forest. Initial spacing in black spruce has a considerable effect on diameter growth of individual trees. It appears that tree diameter increases moderately when stand density decreases from 3086 to 2066 trees/ha. However, when stand density decreases further to 1372 trees, tree diameter increases considerably. With decreasing stand density, average live crown size and branch diameter of the black spruce plantations show a steady increase, and consequently the best grade (Select Structural) recovery tends to decrease. However, when grades No.2 and Better are combined (current market practice), no significant differences were observed among the 4 initial spacings. With decreasing stand density, average stem taper for trees of the same diameter class tends to increase. As a result, trees of the same diameter class from lower stand density generally tend to have a lower tree volume, and thus a lower lumber volume and value recovery per tree. On the other hand, lumber volume/value recovery per tree increases dramatically with tree diameter. Consequently, at the stand level, the lowest stand density still have a considerably higher lumber volume/value recovery per tree due to an increased average tree diameter. Despite the fact that trees in the lowest stand density are larger, the total stand (product) value per hectare is lower than in the case of the denser stand (3086 trees/ha) because it has fewer trees. However, the lowest stand density (1372 trees/ha) generates a better economic return than the highest stand density because of the lower initial investment and reduced harvesting and processing costs per m3 of resource. Lumber from stand densities of 3086, 2500 and 2066 trees/ha has a comparable strength and stiffness. However, lumber strength and stiffness from stand density of 1372 trees/ha are respectively about 30 and 18% lower on average, than the other 3 stand densities. The major source of concern arises when the 48-year-old plantations are compared to the black spruce from natural stands being processed across eastern Canada. On average, lumber stiffness from the natural stands is about 60% higher than the average lumber stiffness of trees from plantation-grown trees of initial stand density of 1372 trees/ha. Results also indicate that lumber stiffness generally increases with increasing log height in the tree. However, lumber strength does not follow the same trend. In general, it appears that lumber strength decreases from the butt log until it reaches its lowest point and then tends to increase steadily with height. While we are confident that the results of the impact of initial spacing on tree/wood characteristics and product recovery and value at the tree DBH class level reflect the general trend for this species within these initial stand densities. We believe that the trends at the stand level reported in this study may not necessarily apply to other sites because the tree diameter frequency distributions for different spacings and growing conditions may vary, which will affect the overall economic return. Therefore, it is necessary to apply the economic variables (costs and values) obtained at the tree level to data from more sites across eastern Canada before a recommendation on optimal initial spacing could be made for black spruce.
Initial spacing
Wood characteristics
Quality
Value recovery
Black spruce
Picea mariana
Documents
Less detail

Impact of precommercial thinning on tree and wood characteristics, and product quality and value in balsam fir

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41855
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Corneau, Yvon C.
Chauret, Gilles
Date
August 1998
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Corneau, Yvon C.
Chauret, Gilles
Date
August 1998
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
65 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Thinning
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Balsam
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No 39
E-3159
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Cette étude a examiné l'impact de l'éclaircie précommerciale de sapin baumier sur différentes caractéristiques du bois et des arbres, ainsi que sur la qualité et la valeur des produits. Cette étude était basée sur le plus ancien site d'éclaircie précommerciale établi par le Ministère des Ressources naturelles du Québec situé près d'Amqui, dans la région du bas St-Laurent. Le peuplement a été regénéré suite à une coupe à blanc en 1948. En 1960, alors que le peuplement était agé de 12 ans, plusieurs parcelles d'éclaircies et parcelles témoins ont été établies afin d'obtenir plusieurs densités résiduelles différentes. En 1995, 35 ans après l'éclaircie précommerciale, 150 arbres d'intérêt commerciale ont été sélectionnés afin de représenter toutes les classes de diamètre (intervalle de 2 cm) d'arbres qui se retrouvaient dans la parcelle témoin et dans les parcelles éclaircies d'intnsité modérée et intensive. À partir de ces arbres échantillons, l'impact de l'éclaircie précommerciale sur différentes caractéristiques du bois et des arbres, ainsi que sur la qualité et la valeur des produits, a été évalué pour chacune des classes de diamètre. Les paramètres étudiés incluaient le diamètre, la hauteur, le défilement et le volume de l'arbre, la longueur et la largeur de la cime, la longueur de la bille sans branches vivantes (sous la cime), le diamètre des branches, l'épaisseur de l'écorce, la densité du bois, le contenu en bois de coeur, la teneur en humidité, le rendement en volume des billes, le rendement en volume des sciages, le rendement en classes de qualité des sciages, le rendement en dimensions des sciages, le rendement en valeu des sciages, la rigidité et la résistance mécanique des sciages, le volume et la valeur des copeaux et le rendement total en valeur. Le mesurage de toutes les parcelles en 1985 et 1995 a aussi permis de déterminer l'effet de l'éclaircie précommerciale apès 25 ans et 35 ans, sur un certain nombre de paramètres ( la surface terrière, le diamètre moyen des arbres, le volume marchand et la valeur des produits) au niveau des peuplements. Selon ces résultats, des intensités d'éclaircie ont été recommandées pour différentes industries. D'autres aspects important ont également été abordés. En comparaison avec les arbres témoins, les arbres d'intérêt commercial des parcelles éclaircies d'une même classe de diamètre ont une hauteur sensiblement moindre, un plus grand défilement et un volume plus faible. Par conséquence, ces arbres ont un rendement en volume de billes et de sciage plus faible. Il en va de même pour le volume de copeaux produit par arbre. Quelque différences ont aussi été remarquées entre les arbres éclaircis et témoins de même classe de diamètre, en ce qui conceerne les caractéristiques qui peuvent affecter la qualité. En génral, les arbres d'intérêt commercial des parcelles éclaircies ont des cimes plus loongues et plus larges, des billes sous la cime plus courtes et de plus grosses branches (diamètre) que les arbres provenant des parcelles témoin. En conséquence, les sciages d'une même classe de diamètre d'arbres provenan des parcelles éclaircies ont un plus faible rendement pour la meilleure classe de qualité (Structure choisie). Par contre, aucune différence significative a été notée par le rendement par les classes de qualité #2 et Meilleur combinées. De plus, cette étude démontre qu'une éclaircie d'intensité modérée a un effet limité sur la qualité des sciages. En fait, les sciages de la même classe de diamètre d'arbres, des parcelles témoin et d'éclaircie modérée ont presque le même rendement qualité. Ils ont également un module d'élasticité (MOE) et un module de rupture (MOR) comparable. Cependant, les arbres provenant des parcelles d'éclaircie intensive ont un MOE et un MOR sensiblement plus faible, spécialement dans le cas des plus grosses classes de diamètre. Ces diminutions du MOE et MOR sont principalement dues à un plus grand diamètre des branches (noeuds) et à une diminution de la densité du bois. Par ailleurs, les arbres d'intérêt commercial des parcelles témoin ont un rendement en valeur (total des produits) par arbre, légèrement plus élevé que ceux d'une même classe de diamètre provenant des parcelles éclaircies. Ceci est principalement dû au fai qu'ils ont un rendement en volume de sciages légèrement plus élevé. Par contre, les caractéristiques du bois et des arbres ainsi que la qualité et la valeur des produits, varient remarquablement avec le diamètre de l'arbre. La hauteur et le volume de l'arbre augmentent considrablement avec le diamètre. Ceci a pour résultat d'augmenter significativement le rendement en volume de sciages, le rendement en volume de copeaux et le rendement en dimensions des sciages par arbre, etceci, autant pour les arbres de la parcelle témoin que pour ceux des parcelles éclaircies. La largeur de la cime, le pourcentage de cime, le diamètre des branches, l'épaisseur de l'écorce, le défilement et le taux d'humidité augmentent de façon variable également avec un accroissement du diamètre. La longeur de la bille sous la cime et le contenu en bois de coeur (en terme d'age) ne semblent pas cepandant changer de façon appréciable avec le diamètre. Cependant, la densité du bois tend à diminuer avec l'accroissement du diamètre, spécialement dans les parcelles intensément éclaircies. En ce qui concerne la qualité des sciages, le rendement en meilleure classe de qualité pour les arbres des parcelles intensément éclaircies diminue considérablement avec une augmentation du diamètre, ce qui n'est pas le cas pour les arbresdes parcelles témoins. De même, le MOE et MOR des arbres des parcelles d'éclaircie intensive diminue considérablement avec un acroissement du diamètre et de façon moindre dans le cas des arbres des parcelles d'éclaircie modérée. Cette tendance ne se rencontre pas dans les parcelles témoins. Lavaleur totale des produits par arbres, augmente d'une façon considérable avec le diamètre de l'arbre, grâce à l'augmentation du rendement en volume de sciage et de copeaux et aussi à cause dde la dimension des sciages. Par exemple, un arbre de 28 cm vaut $ 28,73, ce qui équivaut à 13.1 arbres de 10 cm au dhp. Cette étude démontre que l'éclaircie précommerciale peut accélérer la croissance radiale de l'arbre, mais qu'une intensité d'éclaircie ne laissant pas plus de 3,500 arbres/ha (tous les arbres) après traitement, est requise pour obtenir un gain substantiel du diamètre des arbres. Plus l'éclaircie est inrensive, plus les gains sont significatifs en terme de diamètre. De plus, l'éclaircie précommerciale dans les peuplements denses de sapin baumier augmente le volume de bois commercial et la valeur des produits au niveau du peuplement. Avec une diminution de la densité du peuplement (ou une augmentation de l'intensité d'éclaircie) de 7500 arbres/ha à 1000 arbres/ha (tous les arbres), le volume du bois commercial augmente graduellement jusqu'à un maximum, puis tend à diminuer. En 1985, soit 25 ans après le traitement, le plus important volume de bois commercial (12.8m³/ha) correspond à une densité de peuplement de 2500-3000 arbres/ha (tous les arbres) ou 1500-2000 arbres/ha (arbre, plus de 1cm), mais l'intensité d'éclaircie de 1000-2000 arbres/ha (tous les arbres) ou 500-1200 arbres (plus d'un cm) produit la plus haute valeur (produits) de peuplement. En 1995, 35 ans après l'éclaircie précommerciale, la plus grande valeur de peuplement de 2500-3000 arbres/ha (tous les arbres) ou 1500-2000 arbres/ha (plus d'un cm). Il faut cependant noter que la valeur des peuplements d'intensité d'éclaircie de 1000-3500 arbres/ha (tous les arbres) varie peu, mais que les éclaircie qui laissent plus de 3500 arbres/ha produiront des peuplements de valeur nettement inférieure. En fait, les parcelles non-éclaircies de plus de 7500 arbres/ha (tous les arbres) pourraient valoir jusqu'à 2000$/ha de mmooins en valeur des produits. Cette étude suggère que l'éclaircie précommerciale des peuplements très denses de sapin baumier semble être un traitement sylvicole efficace et viable. Elle démontre également que l'éclaircie précommerciale peut réduire l'âge d'exploitabilité jusqu'à 10 ans. Ceci est particulièrement intéressant pour les scieries qui pourraient faire face à une pénuries de billes de sciage dans le futur. Une réduction de l'âge de récolte réduira l'apparition de pourriture et de carie dans les peuplements de sapin baumier. De plus, un diamètre plus grand des arbres dans les peuplements éclaircis réduira leds coûts de récolte et de transformation et produira des sciages de plus grandes dimensions. En plus des avantages économiques, les avantages sociaux et environnementaux ont aussi été touchés brièvement dans ce rapport. Il faudrait retenir que l'éclaircie précommerciale peut cependant avoir quelques effets négatifs sur la qualité des billles (i.e.,défilement, diamètre des branches, longueur des billes sous la cime) et conséquemment sur la qualité du produit. Les effets négatifs pourraient toutefois être réduits par la sélction d'une intensité d'éclaircie appropriée et de l'âge de l'intervention. Selon la réponse de certain paramètre-clés (i.e., diamètre de l'arbre, qualité et valeur du produit) au niveau du peuplement, 25 ans et 35 ans après l'éclaircie précommerciale, des recommandations ont été faites pour différentes industries (tableau 31). Puisque la valeur des peuplements qui ont été soumis à une éclaircie précommerciale variant entre 1000-3500 arbres/ha varie très peu, il s'ensuit que la décision du choix de l'intensité d'éclaircie dépend en grande partie des objectifs de la compagnie en cause (tableau 30). SI une compgnie désire maximiser la croissance en diamètre et/ou réduire l'âge d'exploitabilité, une éclaircie intensive devrait être choisie. Si par contre, une compagnie veut mettre l'accent sur la qualité des produits l'intensité de l'éclaircie devrait être plutôt modérée.
Precommercial Thinning
Wood characteristics
Product Quality
Balsam Fir
Documents
Less detail

Industrial bark utilization : perspectives for major eastern Canadian softwoods

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41715
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Chauret, Gilles
Date
January 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Chauret, Gilles
Date
January 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Utilization
Softwoods
Canada
Bark
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Bark - Utilization
Softwoods - Eastern Canada
Documents
Less detail

Knowledge transfer : maximizing jack pine value

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5987
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Chauret, Gilles
Duchesne, I.
Schneider, R.
Date
January 2005
Edition
42358
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Zhang, S.Y. (Tony)
Chauret, Gilles
Duchesne, I.
Schneider, R.
Date
January 2005
Edition
42358
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Silviculture
Wood quality
Series Number
Fact Sheet
E-4053
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
.
Silviculture
Wood quality
Forest products - Quality
Documents
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.