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Conception performante d’enveloppes de bâtiments à ossature de bois appliquée à la construction industrialisée

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8159
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Date
Mai 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America. Special Publication SP-53. Vancouver, BC
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
Mai 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Construction
Energy efficiency
Exterior
Roofs
Walls
Series Number
InfoNote 2021 No.21
Language
French
Abstract
Le présent document a été élaboré en vue de faciliter la construction industrialisée d'enveloppes de bâtiments à base de bois (murs extérieurs, toits), et donc de répondre aux exigences accrues en matière d'efficacité énergétique.
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InfoNote2021N21F.pdf

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Energy efficient wood-frame building envelope assemblies in industrialized construction

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8158
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Date
May 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
for Buildings (NECB) have been incrementally raising energy efficiency requirements, moving towards being net
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
May 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Construction
Energy efficiency
Exterior
Roofs
Walls
Series Number
InfoNote 2021 No.21
Language
English
Abstract
This document has been developed to facilitate industrialized construction for wood-based building envelopes (exterior wall, roof) to meet increased energy efficiency requirements.
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InfoNote2021N21E.pdf

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In-situ testing of the wood innovation and design centre for serviceability performance

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49840
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
48 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Testing
Performance
Wood
Buildings
Language
English
Abstract
Three performance attributes of a building for serviceability performance are 1) vibration of the whole building structure, 2) vibration of the floor system, typically in regards to motions in a localized area within the entire floor plate, and 3) sound insulation performance of the wall and floor assemblies. Serviceability performance of a building is important as it affects the comfort of its occupants and the functionality of sensitive equipment as well. Many physical factors influence these performances. Designers use various parameters to account for them in their designs and different criteria to manage these performances. The overall objectives of this stud were threefold: 1. The vibration performance tests were to experimentally determine the dynamic properties, e.g., natural frequencies (periods) and damping ratios of the WIDC building through ambient vibration testing on: o the bare structure in 2014, o the finished building upon completion of the construction with occupants in 2015, and o the finished building after 3 years of service in 2017. 2. The floor vibration tests were to evaluate vibration performance of the innovative CLT floor based on the bare floor fundamental natural frequency, 1 kN static deflection, and subjective evaluation. 3. The sound transmission tests were to determine the Apparent Sound Transmision Class (ASTC) and Apparent Impact Insulation Class (AIIC) of selected innovative CLT floor assemblies. ASTM and ISO standard test methods were used for the floor vibration and sound insulation performance tests. The verified FPInnovations’ protocol was used for building vibration performance tests. In-situ tests carried out on the Wood Innovation and Design Centre have provided solid data on the serviceability performances of taller mass timber buildings, for both before and after completion. These data could be referenced by architects and engineers to help them in their designs and modelling to control building vibrations, floor vibrations and sound insulation performance. More specifically, the floor vibration performance was found to be satisfactory, and the sound transmission ratings were found to be above the minimum required level specified by the building code. As observed from the tests on sound insulation performance, it is recommended to avoid small cavities in floor or wall assemblies to improve and optimize the acoustical performance. Based on the feedbacks and our experience of building vibration performance, it also recommended to refine the design tool, such as the building dynamic analysis model, using the measured frequencies so to improve the accuracy of the estimated building frequencies.
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In-situ testing of wood innovation and design centre: floor vibration, building vibration, and sound insulation performance

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub53039
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Pirvu, Ciprian
Ramzi, Redouane
Date
July 2015
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
for wood and hybrid wood buildings, and lack of knowledge of vibration performance of innovative CLT
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Pirvu, Ciprian
Ramzi, Redouane
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
July 2015
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
49 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Testing
Performance
Wood
Buildings
Language
English
Abstract
This report describes the building, tested floor and wall assemblies, test methods, and summarizes the test results. The preliminary performance data provides critical feedback on the design of the building for resisting wind-induced vibration and on the floor vibration controlled design. The data can be further used to validate the calculation methods and tools/models of dynamic analysis. Originally confidential to FII, they have provided permission to make the report available.
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Instrumentation for monitoring performance in a six-storey building in Vancouver built for high energy performance

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7512
Author
Wang, Jieying
Thomas, Tony
Date
March 2018
Edition
49833
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
. Follow us on: 301012209: Transformative Technologies Program – High Energy Efficiency Buildings
Author
Wang, Jieying
Thomas, Tony
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2018
Edition
49833
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Monitoring
Performance
Buildings
Energy
Moisture content
Air
Series Number
Transformative Technology ; TT 2018
Language
English
Abstract
This report documents the instrumentation installed for monitoring moisture, indoor air quality and differential movement performance in a six-storey building located in the City of Vancouver. The building has five storeys of wood-frame construction above a concrete podium, providing 85 rental units for residential and commercial use. It was designed and built to meet the Passive House standard and, once certified, will be the largest building in Canada that meets this rigorous energy standard. Although the design and construction focused on integrating a number of innovative measures to improve energy efficiency, much effort was also made to reduce construction costs. One example of the design measures is the use of a highly insulating exterior wall assembly that integrates rigid insulation between two rows of wall studs as interior air and vapour barriers. This monitoring study aims to generate data on long-term performance as part of FPInnovations’ effort to assist the building sector in developing durable and energy efficient wood-based buildings, which is expected to translate into reduced energy consumption and carbon emissions from the built environment. The monitoring focuses on measuring moisture performance of the building envelope (i.e., exterior walls, roof, and sill plates); indoor environmental quality including temperature, humidity, and CO2; and vertical differential movement between exterior walls and interior walls below roof/roof decks. In total, 79 instruments were installed during the construction. The next steps of this study will focus on collecting and analysing data from the sensors installed, and assessing performance related to the building envelope and vertical differential movement. FPInnovations will also collaborate with CanmetENERGY of Natural Resources Canada to monitor heat recovery ventilators and to assess whole-building energy efficiency and occupant comfort. This is expected to start after the mechanical systems are fully commissioned during occupancy. Results of these upcoming phases of work will be published in future reports.
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Quantifying the impacts of moisture and load on vertical movement in a simulated bottom floor of a 6-storey platform frame building

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39705
Author
Wang, Jieying
King, L.
Date
March 2013
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
of wood frame buildings has become an important consideration in recent years with the increase
Author
Wang, Jieying
King, L.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2013
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Building construction
Moisture content
Test methods
Series Number
Transformative Technologies Project No.301006157
W-3006
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Vertical movement of wood frame buildings has become an important consideration in recent years with the increase of building height in Europe, North America, and Asia up to 6-storeys. This movement is composed of wood shrinkage and load-induced movement including initial settlement and creep. It is extremely difficult to identify the relative contributions of these components while monitoring full size buildings. A laboratory test was therefore designed to do this under controlled environmental and loading conditions. Two identical small-scale platform frame structures with dimensional lumber floor joists were designed and constructed, with built-in vertical movement and moisture content monitoring systems. The two structures were first conditioned in a chamber to achieve an initial moisture content (MC) about 20% to simulate typical MC on exposed construction sites in wintertime in Coastal BC. After the two structures were moved from the conditioning chamber into the laboratory environment, using a unique cantilever system, Structure No. 1 was immediately loaded to measure the combined shrinkage and deformation in the process of drying. Structure No. 2 was not loaded until after the wood had dried to interior equilibrium moisture content to observe the shrinkage and load-induced movement separately. The load applied on the two structures simulated a dead load experienced by the bottom floor of a six-storey wood frame building. The vertical movement and MC changes were monitored over a total period of six months. Meanwhile, shrinkage coefficients were measured by using end-matched lumber samples cut from the plate members of the two structures to predict the shrinkage amounts of the horizontal members of the two structures. The results suggested that a load must be applied for movement to “show up” and occur in a downward direction. Without loads other than the wood weight, even shrinkage could show as upward movement. Monitoring of Structure No. 1 appeared to separate the contributions of wood shrinkage, initial settlement (bedding-in movement), and creep reasonably well. The entire movement amount reached about 19 mm after six months, which was comparable to the vertical movement measured from the bottom floor of a 4-storey wood-frame building in BC. Shrinkage accounted for over 60% of the vertical movement, with the other 40% contributed by load-induced movement including initial settlement and creep (when elastic compression was neglected); the magnitude of creep was similar to the initial settlement amount. Structure No. 2 showed less vertical movement but an increased settlement amount at the time of loading, indicating the presence of larger gaps between members when the wood was dry (with an estimated MC of 11%) before loading. Depending on construction sequencing, such settlement should occur with increase in loads during construction and can therefore be ignored in design. However, this test suggested that there may be a need to consider the impact of creep, in wet climates in particular, in addition to wood shrinkage. This laboratory test will be maintained for a longer period to observe any further vertical movement and the relative contributions of shrinkage and creep. Similar tests should be conducted for structures built with engineered wood floor joists, given the fact that most mid-rise platform buildings use engineered wood floor joists instead of lumber joists.
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Review and survey on differential movement in wood frame construction

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39274
Author
Wang, Jieying
Ni, Chun
Date
March 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Wang, Jieying
Ni, Chun
Date
March 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Construction
Thermal analysis
Sustainability
Swelling
Shrinkage
Building construction
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 12
W-2756
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report summarizes the existing knowledge on building movement related to wood-frame construction. This knowledge includes fundamental causes and characteristics of wood shrinkage, instantaneous and time-dependent deformations under load, major wood-based materials used for construction and their shrinkage characteristics, movement amounts in publications based on limited field measurement, and movement estimations by construction practitioners based on their experience with wood-frame construction. Movement analysis and calculations were also demonstrated by focusing on wood shrinkage based on common engineering design assumptions, using six-storey platform buildings as examples. The report then provides engineering solutions for key building locations where differential movement could occur, based on the literature review as well as a small-scale survey of the construction industry. The report emphasizes the importance of comprehensive analysis during design and construction to accommodate differential movement. Most building materials move when subjected to loading or when environmental conditions change. It is always good practice to detail buildings so that they can accommodate a certain range of movement, whether due to structural loading, moisture or temperature changes. For wood-frame buildings, movement can be reduced by specifying materials with lower shrinkage rates, such as engineered wood products and drier lumber. However, this may add considerable costs to building projects, especially when specifications have to be met through customized orders. Producing lumber with a lower moisture content adds significant costs, given the additional energy consumption, lumber degrade and sorting requirements during kiln drying. Specifying materials with lower moisture content at time of delivery to job site does not guarantee that wood will not get wet during construction, and excessive shrinkage could still be caused by excessively long time of exposure to rain during construction. On the other hand, effective drying can occur during the period between lumber delivery and lumber closed into building assemblies. Appropriate measures should be taken to ensure lumber protection against wetting, protected panel fabrication on site, good construction sequence to facilitate air drying, and supplementary heating before closing in to improve wood drying. This report also provides recommendations for future work, including field measurement of movement and construction sequencing optimization, in order to provide better information for the design and construction of wood buildings, five- and six-storey platform frame buildings in particular.
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Using life cycle assessment to reduce environmental impacts in Canadian construction. A review of best regulatory practices

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub52901
Author
Grann, Blane
Mahalle, Lal
Date
March 2020
Material Type
Research report
Field
Environment
environmental impacts of construction products and buildings. Recommendations are provided for incorporating
Author
Grann, Blane
Mahalle, Lal
Date
March 2020
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
22 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Environment
Research Area
Environment
Subject
Building construction
Buildings
Canada
Construction
Environmental impact
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Materials
Regulations
Series Number
Wood Products ; 2020
Location
Canada
Language
English
Abstract
This report reviews life cycle assessment (LCA) based regulatory approaches that have been adopted in several countries to evaluate and improve environmental impacts of cosntruction products and buildings. Recommendations are provided for incorporating LCA into Canadian regulations (including the National Building Code of Canada), and for enhancing building LCA guidelines to address principles of consistency, simplicity, and representative data which can improve the effectiveness of LCA to achieve regulatory objectives. This work supports the project need of guidance for performance-based design to accelerate the introduction of wood-based systems. The findings of this review can be used to help accelerate the adoption of life cycle-based regulations for buildings and infrastructure in Canada.
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Vapour condensation potential in insulated wood-frame building enclosure assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39385
Author
Wang, Jieying
Date
December 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
December 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Building construction
Moisture
Swelling
Thermal analysis
Vapor
Series Number
Future Focus No. TT1.1.10
W-2857
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Starting with a brief introduction on energy efficiency trends and initiatives/programs in the residential construction sector, this report focuses on the causes of, and ways to reduce vapour condensation. It also covers performance of wood-frame building enclosures, specifically walls, traditional vented roofs and relatively new unvented roofs, during laboratory/field testing and service. It confirms that the key to achieving long-term durability for highly insulated walls and unvented roofs in cold and coastal mild climates is to ensure good air tightness and reduce air exfiltration, control indoor humidity, reduce outward vapour diffusion, and keep wood elements warm. For traditional vented roofs in cold climates the key is to ensure good sealing at ceilings, reduce indoor humidity and maintain good attic ventilation. Studies on ventilation reduction and optimization to potentially reduce attic humidity, in coastal mild climates in particular, are also discussed. Based on the identified knowledge gaps in how to ensure good durability performance of highly insulated wood-frame building enclosure assemblies, the report provides recommendations for future work:
Conduct field testing of highly insulated building enclosure assemblies to further quantify vapour condensation potential under realistic indoor and outdoor conditions in the representative climates in North America.
Inspect older houses/buildings built with high levels of insulation in the building enclosure to assemble service performance data, and summarize solutions to achieving good durability and energy efficiency.
Further improve hygrothermal simulation tools to improve the prediction of moisture and energy performance and thereby the design and construction of highly insulated building enclosure assemblies.
Provide guidelines on durable, buildable and economical building enclosure assemblies to improve the design and construction of energy efficient wood-frame houses/buildings. The progress related to these items has been reported.
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9 records – page 1 of 1.