Skip header and navigation

30 records – page 1 of 3.

3 : le déchiquetage : la qualité des copeaux : à la déchiqueteuse-équarisseuse (Canter)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2107
Author
Pleau, J.H.
Date
January 1993
Edition
38643
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Pleau, J.H.
Date
January 1993
Edition
38643
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Chippers
Series Number
E-1845
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
French
Abstract
Chipper Canters - Maintenance
Documents
Less detail

Chipping roadside debris with the Bruks chipper in West-Central Alberta

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3253
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
1994
Edition
39915
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
1994
Edition
39915
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Sites
Chippers
Waste utilization
Alberta
Series Number
FO Special Reports ; SR 91
Language
English
Abstract
PRODUCTIVITY
COSTS
ALBERTA
CHIPPING
CHIPPERS
Documents
Less detail

Chip recovery and productivity of frozen and unfrozen hardwood and softwood at a Saskatchewan pulp mill

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3896
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
March 2003
Edition
40619
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
March 2003
Edition
40619
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Woodrooms
Saskatchewan
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Productivity
Chippers
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 5
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) evaluated wood chip recovery and productivity at Weyerhaeuser Company Limited's pulp mill in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Frozen and unfrozen hardwood and softwood logs were debarked and shipped over a range of butt diameters and lengths. This report summarizes the chip recovery, quality, and productivity, and provides recommendations on how the operation and chip recovery can be improved.
Chips
Chipping
Woodrooms
Debarking
Chip quality
Chip recovery
Chipping productivity
Drum debarkers
Disc chippers
Saskatchewan
Documents
Less detail

Comparing chips made in a woodroom to chips made by a portable system

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40609
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Woodrooms
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Productivity
Portable systems
Chippers
Costs
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 49
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC undertook a study in central Alberta to compare debarking and chipping of small-diameter logs at a woodroom chipping operation and at a portable in-woods chipping operation. FERIC evaluated whether chip recovery and quality, and chipping productivity, are affected by changes in stem size, log condition (unfrozen versus frozen), and debarking and chipping method. Net operational costs were also examined.
Chips
Chipping
Woodrooms
Portable chipper
Debarking
Chip quality
Chip recovery
Chipping productivity
Chipping costs
Alberta
Documents
Less detail

Compendium on forest feedstocks studies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40175
Author
Desrochers, Luc
Date
2013
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Desrochers, Luc
Date
2013
Material Type
Research report
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
United States (USA)
Forestry
Chippers
Trailers
Biomass
Canada
Harvesting
Series Number
FO Compendium ; 2013
Location
Pointe Claire, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Interactive index of research report summaries regarding forest feedstocks
Report availability varies depending on membership
Originally produced on CD
Documents

Compendium2013

Download
Less detail

Effect of tool wear, tool sharpening, species and temperature on lumber surface and chip quality in chipper-canters using disposable knives - Phase IV

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39121
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
35 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Chippers
Series Number
General Revenue Report Project No. 2663
2663
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of tool wear, tool sharpening and temperature on lumber surface and chip quality in the conversion of black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.] and balsam fir logs [Abies Balsamea (L.) Mill.] with chipper-canters equipped with disposable knives. Lumber quality is determined by losses due to trimming necessitated by large knife marks and wood tear-out, which cause boards to bedowngraded. Chip quality is determined by the proportion of fine particles in chip classification tests. Tests were conducted with black spruce logs in summer (unfrozen conditions) (ave. temp. 9.2°C) and with black spruce and balsam fir logs in winter (frozen conditions) (ave. temp. -14.7°C). As the test progressed, knife wear, chip quality and log surface quality were measured. During the unfrozen tests, the knives operated during 153 hours and they were sharpened after 51 and 102 hours of operation. The fines content increased by 0.6% (1.8 to 2.4%) over the 153-hour operation, which represents a chip revenue loss of 0.3%. Total value losses (based on current lumber prices) were 5.1% with new knives, and reached 9.3% at the end of the 153 hours of operation. During the frozen tests, the knives operated during 48 hours and they were sharpened after 16 and 32 hours of operation. The fines content increased by 1.8% (3.2 to 4.8%) for balsam fir for a 32-hour period; the mean fines content proportion was 4%, which represents a 1.3% increase in fines content. The fines content decreased slightly, by 0.2 % (3.4 to 3.2%) for black spruce over a 48-hour period; the mean fines content proportion was 3.3%, which represents a 0.2% loss in chip revenue. Total losses for black spruce were 5.3% with new knives, and reached 8% at the end of the 48-hour operation period. For balsam fir, total losses were 8.7% with new knives, and reached 9.5% at the end of the 48 hours. The proportion of boards qualifying as Premium grade decreased after each knife sharpening operation under summer and winter conditions. For example, the proportion of boards qualifying for Premium grade with less than 1/32” wood tear-out was 6.8% for new knives, 4.2% for knives sharpened once, and 3.4% for knives sharpened twice (24.5%, 11.9% and 8.4% respectively under winter conditions). Under winter conditions, the proportion of boards qualifying for Premium was lower for balsam fir than for black Spruce. In addition, the proportion of boards qualifying for Premium grade was lower in summer than in winter: those results are difficult to explain, given that knife wear in summer and winter, as were log moisture conditions. The counter-knives were changed between the summer and the winter study. Better fibre separation at the counter-knife can reduce wood tear-out. Other general observations made during this study: 1- Mean chip length decreased with knife wear. 2- Mean chip length decreased after each knife sharpening operation. 3- Balsam fir mean chip length was lower than black spruce logs under frozen conditions. 4- Mean chip length was higher for unfrozen logs than for frozen logs. 5- Fines content proportions increased with knife wear. 6- Fines content increased after each knife sharpening operation. 7- Fines content was lower in unfrozen logs than in frozen logs. 8- Fines content was higher in balsam fir logs than in black spruce logs under frozen conditions. 9- Tear-out volume per surface unit decreased with knife wear. 10- Tear-out volume per surface unit decreased after each knife sharpening operation. 11- Tear-out volume per surface unit was lower for balsam fir than for black spruce under frozen conditions. 12- Tear-out volume per surface unit was higher under frozen conditions than under unfrozen conditions. 13- Tear-out volume per surface unit was proportional to the affected surface area. 14- With black spruce monetary losses incurred under frozen conditions were comparable to those observed after only a third of the operating time under unfrozen conditions. 15- Under frozen conditions, monetary losses were higher for balsam fir than for black spruce. 16- Monetary losses increased after each knife sharpening operation. 17- Mean tear-out depth was higher in balsam fir than in black spruce. 18- Mean tear-out depth increased after each knife sharpening operation. 19- Knife wear reduction (for long and finishing knife) was about 0.020” in summer and in winter. 20- Total tip recession during 16-hour shifts under frozen conditions was slightly lower than or similar to the wear over 51 hours of operation under unfrozen conditions. In general, we can state that, for new knives, tool wear occurs about 3 times faster under frozen conditions than under unfrozen conditions. For sharpened knives, tool wear occurred slightly faster in frozen wood than in unfrozen wood. 21- Long knife edges wore faster than finishing knife edges under both frozen and unfrozen conditions 22- Knife wear rates tended to decrease slightly after each knife sharpening operation. 23- The difference between chip and fines prices was an invariable loss indicator for the fines proportion. For example if the price difference was $110, then 1% fines content corresponded to an invariable value loss of $17,864 (based on a 100,000 m3 log consumption). If the fines content was 3%, then the total fines loss was $53,592 (3 x 17,864). Note: The calculations of the monetary losses were based considering that the totality of the lumber pieces can be classified Premium. In reality, around 30% of the pieces can be Premium; natural wane, rot, knots and other defects cause degrade without being damaged by the debarker or the canter. Losses must then be reduced to 30% of their value if the entire production is considered.
chip quality
Chipper-canters
Documents
Less detail

Effects of knife velocity, knife bite and number of knives on lumber surface and chip quality in chipper-canters using bent knives and disposable knives (Phase III)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38971
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Chippers
Series Number
2663
E-4121
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on lumber surface and chip quality of knife bite, knife velocity and the number of knives in the conversion of black spruce logs [Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.] with chipper-canters equipped with bent knives and disposable knives. Lumber quality is determined by losses due to trimming necessitated by large knife marks and wood tear-out, which cause board downgrading. Chip quality is determined by the proportion of fine particles in chip classification tests (length and thickness). Twelve tests were conducted with the following variables: 22.2 mm and 28.6 mm knife bite; 3 and 6 knives; and 762.2, 1219.5, 1676.8 and 2131.1 m/min knife velocity. Preliminary results showed that chip fines contents increased with knife velocity while surface quality was not significantly affected. Mean chip length and mean chip thickness decreased as knife velocity increased and knife bite increased. The tests were performed on logs 2.54 m in length and 15 cm in diameter at temperatures in the 15-25°C range. The proportion of fines was lower with bent knives but it tended to increase when knife velocity increased. There was no difference in the proportion of fines for a given knife bite but it was affected by the number of knives. The proportion of chip fines increased with knife velocity. Mean chip thickness decreased as knife velocity increased; it also decreased with an increasing number of knives. With all other parameters being equal, mean chip thickness was greater with bent knives. As knife bite increased, so did mean chip thickness. Mean chip length generally decreased as knife velocity increased; it also decreased as the number of knives increased. For a given number of knives, mean chip length was greater with bent knives. As knife bite increased, mean chip length increased too. Unlike the results obtained with mean chip length, mean chip thickness was always greater with primary cuts than with secondary cuts. Differences between mean chip thickness in primary and secondary cuts were less than 1%. It was therefore considered reasonable to analyze chips from both cuts as a single lot without affecting mean chip thickness. Surface tear-out generally decreased as knife velocity increased. Greater knife bite increased surface tear-out. A greater number of knives decreased surface tear-out. Bent-type knives decreased surface tear-out by comparison with disposable knives under all conditions. The proportion of boards qualifying as Premium grade with less than 1/32” wood tear-out was less than 30% for 1.640” target size and 10% to 40% for 1.700” target size. For Premium grade accepting wood tear-out less than 1/16”, the proportion of acceptable boards was 10%-50% (1.640”) and 20%-60% (1.700”). For Premium grade accepting wood tear-out less than 1/8”, the proportion of acceptable boards was 50%-80% (1.640”) and 60%-90% (1.700”). Under all conditions, cutting knife and counter-knife rake angles were lower at the entry point into the wood than at the exit point. Cutting knives always had larger angles than counter-knives. Finishing knife rake angles were always greater at the entry point than at the exit point. With bent knives, cutting knife angles were smaller but counter knife angles were always greater than those of disposable knives; finishing bent knife angles were greater than those of disposable knives. Except at 1200 m/min knife velocity, bent knives were associated with higher monetary losses than disposable knives. A head equipped with six disposable knives seemed to incur lower losses at lower knife velocity, and a 22.2 mm knife bite seemed to result in lower monetary losses than a 28.6 mm knife bite. Note: The calculations of the monetary losses were based considering that the totality of the lumber pieces can be classified Premium. In reality, around 30% of the pieces can be Premium; natural wane, rot, knots and other defects cause degrade without being damaged by the debarker or the canter. Losses must then be reduced to 30% of their value if the entire production is considered.
Chips - Quality
Chippers
Documents
Less detail

Effet de la hauteur de bille et de la température sur la qualité de surface et des copeaux produits par une équarrisseuse-déchiqueteuse - Phase V

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39120
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
21 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Chippers
Series Number
Projet General Revenue no 2663
2663
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Cette étude a servi à mesurer l’effet de la position verticale et de la température des billes sur la qualité des copeaux et de la surface sur une tête conique d’équarrisseuse installée sur le banc d’essai dans les laboratoires de FPInnovations à Québec. Les billes ont été élevées respectivement de 1, 2 3 et 3,5 po à partir de la plus basse position relative à la tête de l’équarrisseuse (position 0 po). La tête était équipée de 6 ensembles de couteaux : chaque ensemble était constitué d’un couteau de finition qui dresse la forme de l’équarri et d’un couteau long qui fragmente le bois en copeaux. La vitesse linéaire des couteaux était de 1200 m/min et la bouchée de 22,2 mm. La température des billes était de 20°C en condition normale (ou dégelée) et de -30°C en condition gelée. Cent trente-cinq billes d’épinette noire (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.) de diamètre moyen de 15 cm au fin bout ont été transformées. La profondeur de coupe était de 1 po tout le long de la bille. Un côté de la bille a été utilisé pour la condition gelée, et l’autre côté a servi pour la condition dégelée. La température a un effet significatif sur la qualité des copeaux et de la surface. La proportion de particules fines est considérablement plus élevée en condition de gel (4,1 % à 8,8 %) comparativement à la condition normale (1 % à 1,7 %). La proportion des copeaux dans toute classe de tamisage est plus variable en condition de gel qu’en condition de dégel. La qualité de surface a diminué en condition de gel : les arrachements sont plus grands. La proportion de classe de produits est sensiblement la même en condition dégelée qu’en condition gelée. Si on tient compte que toutes les pièces du test ont le potentiel d’être Premium, les pertes monétaires dues à la perte de classe, à l’éboutage et au contenu de particules fines variaient de 6,2 % à 8,3 % en condition de gel, comparativement à des pertes de 4 % à 6,7 % en condition normale. En pratique, environ 30% peut se qualifier Premium ; les pertes monétaires en condition de gel variaient alors de 1,4% à 2,3% et celles en condition normale variaient entre 1,2% à 2%. La hauteur de la position de la bille dans la tête d’équarrisseuse a un effet significatif sur la qualité des copeaux et de la surface. Lorsque les billes sont élevées dans la tête, la proportion de particules fines augmente, alors que la proportion des particules de grandes dimensions diminue, et cette variation est plus importante en condition de gel. En conditions normale et de gel, la qualité de surface est la meilleure dans le test 3, soit 2 po au-dessus de la position la plus basse. La qualité de surface diminue autant en élevant qu’en baissant la bille par rapport à cette position. Des tests préliminaires à une hauteur de 4 po ont provoqué des arrachements très sévères, au point où les billes n’ont pu être transformées en sciages : il y a donc une limite à hausser les billes dans l’équarrisseuse. Le fait d’abaisser la bille de 4 po à 3,5 po a réduit considérablement les arrachements et permis de pouvoir tester cette position de bille. L’ajustement de la hauteur de la position de la bille dans l’équarrisseuse est donc critique. L’angle de coupe du couteau de finition à la position 2 po est de -13° à l’entrée et de 30° à la sortie de la bille. L’angle de coupe du couteau long est de 57° à l’entrée et de 100° à la sortie. L’amplitude de ces angles devrait en principe donner des résultats comparables pour des têtes d’équarrisseuses de diamètres différents. Des tests doivent cependant valider cette hypothèse. Les résultats de cette étude permettront aux utilisateurs d’ajuster la hauteur de la position de leur tête d’équarrisseuse de façon appropriée, en tenant compte de l’effet de la température des billes.
Chippers
Documents
Less detail

Effets de la vitesse d'alimentation, de rotation et de la position des billes sur la qualité des surfaces et des copeaux provenant des équarrisseuses-déchiqueteuses - Phase II

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42267
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
September 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
September 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
33 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Chippers
Series Number
E-3876
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Cette étude consistait à déterminer la qualité de surface et la qualité des copeaux provenant d’équarrisseuses-déchiqueteuses soumises à différentes conditions de fonctionnement. Pour évaluer la qualité de surface, nous avons mesuré les pertes d’éboutage et les pertes de déclassement par rapport à la qualité Premium du fait de l’arrachement de fibres. Afin de tenir également compte de l’augmentation abusive de l’épaisseur cible pour compenser l’arrachement de bois, nous avons aussi appliqué une déduction de rendement de 0,5% par fraction de 0,010 po dépassant 1,700 po. La qualité des copeaux était fondée sur leur répartition en longueur et en épaisseur. La quantité de particules fines produites représentait une perte. La phase II de cette étude comportait trois tests différents : le premier test consistait à débiter des billes de bois à l’aide d’une équarrisseuse-déchiqueteuse classique avec lames circulaires jumelées; la vitesse de rotation de la tête d’équarrissage était de 577 tours à la minute (tr/min) et la vitesse d’alimentation variait de 200 à 250 et à 300 pieds à la minute (pi/min). Dans le deuxième test, la vitesse d’alimentation était fixée à 300 pi/min mais la vitesse de rotation des têtes d’équarrissage était fixée successivement à 625, 577, 526 et 476 tr/min. Le troisième test, effectué dans une autre scierie, consistait à positionner les billes à deux hauteurs différentes: une à 4,5 po au-dessus de la position habituelle et l’autre à la position habituelle. Pour le test de variation de la vitesse d’alimentation, les pertes se sont avérées plus faibles lorsque la vitesse d’alimentation était la plus basse, c'est-à-dire lorsque la longueur de copeau calculée était la plus faible. Dans le test de variation de la vitesse de rotation, les pertes étaient plus faibles lorsque la vitesse de rotation était plus élevée, c'est-à-dire lorsque la LCC était plus faible. Nous avons toutefois constaté que les meilleurs résultats coïncidaient avec une longueur de copeau calculée de 0,72 po, obtenue avec une vitesse d’alimentation élevée (300 pi/min au lieu de 200 pi/min) et une vitesse de rotation élevée (625 tr/min). Dans le test de hauteur de bille, une position plus élevée des billes a entraîné une augmentation des pertes; il est donc préférable de conserver la hauteur de bille normale. L’ensemble des résultats des trois tests effectués donne de meilleurs résultats que la phase I du projet; on peut donc en conclure que d’autres paramètres de rendement sont intervenus, et qu’il faudra en tenir compte lors d’études ultérieures. L’étude a été effectuée avec 235 billes d’épinette noire (picea mariana) et de sapin baumier (abies balsamea) fraîchement coupées, et nous l’avons réalisée à l’usine Gérard Crête et fils de St-Roch-de-Mékinac et à l’usine Scieries Saguenay Ltée de Ville de la Baie dans le comté de Saguenay, Québec. Les billes étaient coupées à une longueur de 5,03 m et avaient un diamètre moyen au fin bout d’environ 20 cm. Nous n’avons rejeté aucune bille à cause de sa forme ou de son état. L’étude a été effectuée à l’automne 2002, et la température extérieure variait entre 0°C et 15°C. Cette étude visait uniquement à mesurer le rendement habituel des scieries participantes, et elle a été réalisée sans modification ni amélioration de l’équipement et des méthodes de travail en usage. Les commentaires de l’auteur sur les résultats obtenus n’ont d’autre but que d’informer les scieries et de les aider à détecter et à corriger rapidement leurs problèmes. La participation de ces scieries a été essentielle à l’avancement de nos connaissances, et nos observations serviront de précieuses références pour l’amélioration et l’optimisation des équarrisseuses-déchiqueteuses chez d’autres membres de Forintek. Note : Le calcul des pertes monétaires a été basé en assumant que la totalité des sciages avait le potentiel d’être classé Premium. En pratique, environ 30% des pièces peut se qualifier Premium car la flache naturelle, la carie, les nœuds et autres défauts causent des déclassements sans égard à la qualité de surface engendrée par l’écorçage et l’équarrissage. Les pertes dues à la classe (pertes en qualité) doivent donc être réduites à 30% de leur valeur si on veut tenir compte de l’ensemble des sciages produits à la scierie.
Chips - Quality
Chippers
Documents
Less detail

Effets de la vitesse de coupe, de la bouchée et du nombre de couteaux sur la qualité de surface des sciages et des copeaux dans les équarrisseuses-déchiqueteuses munies de couteaux pliés ou de couteaux jetables (phase III)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42390
Author
Laganière, B.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Laganière, B.
Contributor
Ressources naturelles Canada - Service canadien des forêts
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Blades
Sawing
Chippers
Series Number
E-4259
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Le but de cette étude était de déterminer les effets de la bouchée des couteaux, de la vitesse de coupe et du nombre de couteaux sur la qualité de surface des sciages et la qualité des copeaux lors de la transformation de billes d’épinette noire [Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.] à l’aide d’équarrisseuses-déchiqueteuses munies de couteaux pliés (conventionnels, ordinaires ou courbes) ou de couteaux jetables. La qualité des sciages était fonction des pertes encourues à l’éboutage pour éliminer les grandes entailles de couteau et les fibres arrachées, qui réduisent le rendement de qualité. La qualité des copeaux était basée sur le pourcentage de particules fines (longueur et épaisseur) lors d’essais au tamis. Nous avons effectué 12 essais portant sur les variables suivantes : bouchée du couteau (22,2 et 28,6 mm), nombre de couteaux (3 et 6) et vitesse de coupe des couteaux (762,2, 1219,5, 1676,8 et 2131,1 m/min). Selon nos essais préliminaires, le pourcentage de fines augmentait avec la vitesse des couteaux, alors que la qualité de surface des sciages n’y était pas sensible. L’épaisseur et la longueur moyennes de copeau diminuaient à mesure que l’on augmentait la vitesse de coupe et la bouchée. Les essais avaient lieu sur des billes de 2,54 m de longueur et de 15 cm de diamètre, à une température de l’ordre de 15 à 25°C. La proportion de fines était plus faible avec les couteaux pliés, mais elle tendait à augmenter avec la vitesse de coupe. La proportion de fines n’était pas non plus sensible à la bouchée, mais elle l’était au nombre de couteaux, et elle augmentait avec la vitesse de coupe. L’épaisseur moyenne des copeaux diminuait à mesure que la vitesse de coupe augmentait; elle diminuait aussi quand on augmentait le nombre de couteaux. Pour un ensemble de paramètres donné, l’épaisseur moyenne des copeaux était plus élevée avec les couteaux pliés. Elle augmentait également quand on augmentait la bouchée du couteau, mais elle diminuait quand on augmentait le nombre de couteaux. Pour un nombre de couteaux donné, la longueur moyenne des copeaux était plus grande avec les couteaux pliés; c’était aussi le cas quand on augmentait la bouchée. Contrairement aux résultats obtenus pour la longueur moyenne, l’épaisseur moyenne mesurée des copeaux était toujours plus élevée au premier débit qu’au deuxième débit, les différences étant de l’ordre de moins de 1 mm. Il nous a donc paru raisonnable d’analyser les copeaux des deux débits en un seul lot sans affecter l’épaisseur moyenne mesurée des copeaux. La qualité de surface tendait à diminuer aux vitesses de coupe plus élevées; elle diminuait aussi quand on augmentait le nombre de couteaux, alors qu’elle augmentait avec la bouchée. Dans tous les cas, l’arrachement de fibres était moins fréquent avec les couteaux pliés qu’avec les couteaux jetables. La proportion de pièces atteignant la qualité « Premium » avec moins de 1/32 po d’arrachement de fibres se situait au-dessous de 30 % pour une épaisseur cible de 1,640 po, et de 10 à 40 % pour une épaisseur cible de 1,700 po. Dans le cas de Premium tolérant 1/16” d’arrachement de fibres, les proportions correspondantes de pièces acceptables étaient de 10 à 50 % (1,640 po) et de 20 à 60 % (1,700 po). Enfin, pour le Premium tolérant 1/8” d’arrachement, les proportions de pièces acceptables variaient de 50 à 80 % (1,640 po) et de 60 à 90 % (1,700 po). Dans tous les cas, l’angle d’attaque du couteau et du contre-couteau était plus faible au point d’entrée dans le bois qu’au point de sortie, et il était plus élevé pour les longs couteaux (couteau de tranchage) que pour les contre-couteaux. L’angle d’attaque des couteaux de finition était toujours plus grand au point d’entrée qu’au point de sortie. Il était plus faible pour les couteaux pliés que pour les couteaux jetables, l’inverse étant vrai dans le cas des contre-couteaux, et dans celui des couteaux pliés de finition. Les pertes financières se sont avérées plus importantes avec les couteaux pliés qu’avec les couteaux jetables. Une tête d’équarrissage munie de six couteaux jetables semblait présenter des pertes moindres à vitesse de coupe plus basse, et les pertes semblaient aussi plus faibles pour une bouchée de couteau de 22,2 mm que lorsqu’elle était de 28,6 mm. Note : Le calcul des pertes monétaires a été basé en assumant que la totalité des sciages avait le potentiel d’être classé Premium. En pratique, environ 30% des pièces peut se qualifier Premium car la flache naturelle, la carie, les nœuds et autres défauts causent des déclassements sans égard à la qualité de surface engendrée par l’écorçage et l’équarrissage. Les pertes dues à la classe (pertes en qualité) doivent donc être réduites à 30% de leur valeur si on veut tenir compte de l’ensemble des sciages produits à la scierie.
Sawing - Blades
Chippers
Documents
Less detail

30 records – page 1 of 3.