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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Benefits of compacting cohesive soils for forest roads

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3851
Author
Légère, Glen
Date
April 2002
Edition
40570
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Légère, Glen
Date
April 2002
Edition
40570
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
6 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation & Infrastructure
Subject
Compaction
Soil
Road construction
Roads
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 9
Language
English
Abstract
Compacting cohesive soils for forest roads is relatively inexpensive ($500 to $1000 per km) and cost-effective, yet compaction still isn't used extensively by the forest industry. Increased soil density reduces settlement, increases soil strength, improves bearing capacity, limits volume changes and often leads to lower construction and maintenance costs. These savings often cover the cost of compaction. FERIC recently studied the impact of soil compaction in two road construction techniques: V-ditch embankment (in which density increased by 8% and penetration resistance tripled) and the lift-over rootmat method (in which density increased little and penetration resistance doubled).
Soil compaction
Road construction
V-Ditch method
Lift-over-rootmat method
Padfoot (tamping foot) compactor
Cohesive soils
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Comparing silvicultural systems in a Coastal montane forest: productivity and cost of harvesting operations

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40003
Author
Phillips, Eric
Date
May 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
timing 12 5.2 Site Disturbance and Compaction 15 5.2.1 Pre-Harvest site surveys 15 5.2.2 Post
Author
Phillips, Eric
Date
May 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
42 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Trees
Systems
Compaction
Soil
Sites
Site disturbance
Silviculture
Shelterwood
Retention
Residues
Productivity
Partial cutting
Logs
Sample
Growth
Costs
British Columbia
Series Number
Special Report ; SR-000109
Language
English
Abstract
The Mountain Alternative Silvicultural Systems (MASS) study is a multi-disciplinary, multi-agency project initiated both for silvicultural and social reasons. MacMillan Bloedel Limited, the Canadian Forest Service, and FERIC cooperated in the study, with participation by the University of Victoria and the University of British Columbia. Three alternative treatments representing a range of canopy removal levels - uniform shelterwood, green tree retention, and patch cutting - were implemented in the research area, located on the east coast of Vancouver Island. FERIC monitored the productivity and cost of the falling and forwarding operations, and measured site disturbance and coarse woody debris for each harvesting treatment. The results of FERIC's study are presented.
Silvicultural systems
Shelterwood systems
GREEN-TREE RETENTION
Clearcutting
Partial cutting systems
Patch cutting
Excavators
Logging residues
Site disturbance
Soil compaction
Productivity
Costs
OLD-GROWTH FORESTS
MONTANE FORESTS
Coastal British Columbia
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Comparison of five treatments used to rehabilitate compacted landings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40468
Author
Sutherland, Brad
Date
June 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Sutherland, Brad
Date
June 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Compaction
Soil
Rehabilitation
Rakes
Productivity
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 1, No. 16
Language
English
Abstract
From July to September 1997, FERIC performed short-term case studies of five different implements used to till compacted landings in the Cariboo Forest Region. The case studies were part of a larger study by Lignum Ltd. and the B.C. Ministry of Forests, Cariboo Forest Region to investigate techniques for rehabiliting compacted medium and fine-textured soils. The five implements studied were: an excavator-mounted six-toothed silvicultural rake; a rake and a high-speed mixing head mounted on skid-steer loader; a Tilth winged subsoiler towed by a crawler tractor; standard ripper teeth mounted on a crawler tractor; and a skidder-mounted powered disc trencher. This report reviews the treatments, productivities and costs of using the five implements.
Soil compaction
Landings
Rehabilitation
Rakes
Productivity
Costs
Interior British Columbia
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Effects of ghost trail on soils and advanced regeneration

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5833
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Brais, Suzanne
Date
November 2000
Edition
40486
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Brais, Suzanne
Date
November 2000
Edition
40486
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Trees
Compaction
Soil
Skidders
Productivity
Harvesting
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 1, No. 34
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC studied the impact of the use of ghost trails by a feller-buncher on the soil and on advance regeneration. Under the study conditions, the results indicated minimal soil disturbance in the ghost trails and a normal reduction in stocking for such an operation. Given that the productivity of the operation with ghost trails was comparable to that of a conventional operation, this approach appears promising.
Ghost trails
John Deere 748G grapple skidder
Prentice FB 630 feller-buncher
Stocking
Ground disturbance
Soil compaction
Productivity
Full-tree harvesting
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Effects of skidder traffic on two types of forest soils

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36809
Author
Meek, Philippe
Date
November 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Meek, Philippe
Date
November 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Compaction
Rutting
Soil disturbance
Soil
Skidders
Sample
FPI TR
Soft soil
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR-000117
Language
English
Abstract
In Canadian boreal forests, harvesting with protection of advance regeneration requires the creation of an intensively used network of skid trails. In this context, the effects of repeated skidder passes on soils were studied in terms of rut depth, the amount of displaced material in the trails, and soil bulks density. Two types of soil were studied: sands and clays. The factors that helped to explain the observed amount of soil disturbance were the number of skidder passes, the amount of wheel slippage, soil density, the soil's penetration resistance, and the soil's shear resistance. The results of the study indicated that the effects of skidder traffic on soil properties stabilized after a few skidder passes on sands, whereas the effects on clay soils continued to increase with an increasing number of skidder passes.
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Evaluation of forest biomass compaction systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43861
Author
Guimier, D.Y.
Date
1985
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Guimier, D.Y.
Date
1985
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
62 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Biomass
Compaction
Series Number
FO Special Report
Language
English
Abstract
This report was prepared under the auspices of the ENFOR (Energy from the Forest) Program of the Canadian Forestry Service. It investigated compaction as an addition to comminution, or as an alternative to comminution, as a practical and economical means for handling transporting and processing logging residues so that they can become a greater source of energy in Canada.
Forest residues
LOGGING RESIDUES
PROCESSING
COMMINUTION
COMPACTION
EVALUATION
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Evaluation of forest biomass compaction systems - Milestone I report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43858
Author
Guimier, D.Y.
Date
1985
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Guimier, D.Y.
Date
1985
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
83 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Biomass
Residues
Compaction
Series Number
FO Special Report
Language
English
Abstract
see also SR-000030
Forest residues
LOGGING RESIDUES
PROCESSING
COMMINUTION
COMPACTION
EVALUATION
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Impact of Machine Traffic on Soil and Regeneration: Proceedings of FERIC's Machine Traffic/Soil Interaction Workshop, Edmonton, AB, February 1999.

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5426
Author
McMorland, Bruce
Corradini, S.
Date
1999
Edition
36787
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
, Terramechanics, Forest soils, Soil compaction, Harvesting equipment, Harvesting/silviculture interface
Author
McMorland, Bruce
Corradini, S.
Date
1999
Edition
36787
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
118 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Compaction
Soil
Silviculture
Harvesting
Soft soil
Series Number
Special Report ; SR-000133
Language
English
Abstract
The relationship between the forest, the soil and the harvesting equipment must be understood if forest companies are to achieve sustainable and environmentally acceptable forest practices. As the soil is both the pavement over which harvesting and site preparation equipment must travel and the growing medium for future harvests, the forest industry must understand the impact of equipment activity on future fibre supply. To provide information on the interaction between forest equipment and the soils, FERIC organized a workshop for forest operations and agency staff, and contractors. More than 80 people attended the workshop that was held in Whitecourt, Alberta on February 26th, 1999. The focus of the presentations was to provide the audience with information and basic soil properties, soil mechanics and vehicle dynamics, and the effects of compaction on soil physical properties. In addition, other presentations included summaries of studies undertaken in western Canada on the impacts of felling and skidding equipment on forest soils, and impacts of harvesting activities and deciduous and coniferous regeneration. Finally, management strategies for minimizing soil degradation were discussed. These Proceedings summarize the presentations during the workshop.
Conferences
Terramechanics
Forest soils
Soil compaction
Harvesting equipment
HARVESTING/SILVICULTURE INTERFACE
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Loader-forwarding on sensitive soils in the boreal forest: a case study

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40637
Author
Sambo, Stephanie
Sutherland, Brad
Date
July 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Sambo, Stephanie
Sutherland, Brad
Date
July 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Compaction
Loaders
Forwarders
Soil
Skidding
Productivity
Sample
Harvesting
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Soft soil
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 22
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) monitored a summer roadside harvesting operation in a hardwood-dominated stand near Dawson Creek in northeastern British Columbia. This report presents the productivity and cost of the harvesting operation and describes the soil disturbance from skidding and loader-forwarding.
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Partial cutting with a Timberjack harvester and forwarder in southern British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40519
Author
Phillips, Eric
Date
May 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Phillips, Eric
Date
May 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Tree damage
Trees
Compaction
Soil
Sites
Site disturbance
Productivity
Partial cutting
Harvesting
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Soft soil
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 2, No. 21
Language
English
Abstract
Cut-to-length harvesting with a Timberjack harvester and forwarder was studied in patch cut, partial cut, and clearcut harvesting blocks in southern B.C. from 1996 to 1999. The harvesting treatments were prescribed to salvage tree mortality form insect attack and windthrow. This study documented operational logistics, cost and productivity of harvesting, residual tree damage, slash loading, and change in soil surface condition.
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16 records – page 1 of 2.