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Compatibility of semi-transparent deck coatings with carbon-based preservative formulations : an update after further exposure

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42469
Author
Stirling, Rod
Morris, Paul I.
Date
November 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Stirling, Rod
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
November 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Decking
Finishing
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 23
W-2854
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Lacking the UV protection provided by copper, carbon-based preservative-treated wood used in many above-ground applications will require coating to meet consumer demand for weather resistance. While earlier metal-based preservatives were true solutions, many of the formulations of carbon-based preservatives rely on surfactants for solubility or dispersion in water. These surfactants can potentially react badly with the dispersion agents in the existing coatings on the market. The present work investigates the performance of six selected coatings on white spruce heartwood and ponderosa pine sapwood untreated and treated with one of three carbon-based preservatives. An earlier report described coating performance after 500 hours of artificial weathering (Stirling and Morris, 2010). The present report describes coating performance after 1000 hours of artificial weathering. The general ratings of the coatings on spruce were typically one to two points higher than those on pine indicating that spruce was a more stable substrate. Contrary to the initial concern, treatment with carbon-based preservatives was associated with coating performance under accelerated UV exposure similar to, or slightly better than, that on untreated wood.
Decking
Finishes - Exterior
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Environmental product declaration, typical western red cedar decking

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7905
Author
FPInnovations
Date
February 2016
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Typical Western Red Cedar Decking Environmental Product Declaration This Type III environmental
Author
FPInnovations
Date
February 2016
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Decking
Environment
EPD
Red cedar
Standards
Series Number
WP EPD 2016
Language
English
Abstract
This Type III environmental declaration is developed according to ISO 21930 and 14025 for average cedar decking products manufactured by the members of the Western Red Cedar Lumber Association. This environmental product declaration (EPD) reports environmental impacts based on established life cycle impact assessment (LCA) methods. The reported environmental impacts are estimates, and their level of accuracy may differ for a particular product line and reported impact. LCAs do not generally address site-specific environmental issues related to resource extraction or toxic effects of products on human health. Unreported environmental impacts include (but are not limited to) factors attributable to human health, land use change and habitat destruction. Forest certification systems and government regulations address some of these issues. The products in this EPD conform to: timber harvesting and silvicultural regulation of British Columbia (BC) and forest certification schemes (Canadian Standards Association, Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and Sustainable Forestry initiative (SFI)). EPDs do not report product environmental performance against any benchmark.
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Environmental product declaration, typical western red cedar decking

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7907
Author
FPInnovations
Date
January 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Typical Western Red Cedar Decking Environmental Product Declaration This Type III environmental
Author
FPInnovations
Date
January 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Decking
Environment
EPD
Red cedar
Standards
Series Number
WP EPD 2018
Language
English
Abstract
This Type III environmental declaration is developed according to ISO 21930 and 14025 for average cedar decking products manufactured by the members of the Western Red Cedar Lumber Association. This environmental product declaration (EPD) reports environmental impacts based on established life cycle impact assessment (LCA) methods. The reported environmental impacts are estimates, and their level of accuracy may differ for a particular product line and reported impact. LCAs do not generally address site-specific environmental issues related to resource extraction or toxic effects of products on human health. Unreported environmental impacts include (but are not limited to) factors attributable to human health, land use change and habitat destruction. Forest certification systems and government regulations address some of these issues. The products in this EPD conform to: timber harvesting and silvicultural regulation of British Columbia (BC) and forest certification schemes (Canadian Standards Association, Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and Sustainable Forestry initiative (SFI)). EPDs do not report product environmental performance against any benchmark.
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Environmental product declaration: typical western red cedar decking

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39867
Author
FPInnovations
Date
April 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Environment
Typical Western Red Cedar Decking Environmental Product Declaration Type III environmental
Author
FPInnovations
Date
April 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Environment
Research Area
Environment
Subject
Environment
Manufacturing
Decking
Thuja plicata
Language
English
Abstract
This EPD addresses products from multiple manufacturers and represents an average for the membership of the Western Red Cedar Lumber Association (WRCLA), a non-profit trade association representing manufacturers of western red cedar products. This average is based on a sample that included two lumber mills in British Columbia (BC), combined with recent secondary data on western red cedar resource extraction from the Athena Institute. The total data represents 20% of western red cedar decking production in the year 2007.
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High-performance profiled wood decking

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5618
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Garlough, J.
Date
March 2008
Edition
37862
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
High-Performance Profiled Wood Decking Paul Morris Group Leader Durability and Protection
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Garlough, J.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2008
Edition
37862
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Decking
Value added
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 79
W-2482
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The premature removal of treated wood from service, due to weathering rather than decay, has led to increased acceptance of alternative products promoted as “low maintenance”. Wood-plastic and pure plastic products threaten to take considerable market share from the approximately 2 million cubic metres of preservative treated softwood lumber production. These competing products have raised the bar for performance and price of decking. Profiling lumber shows promise to provide a makeover with a new look and reduced checking. Application of a durable coating should reduce the effects of weathering and reduce leaching of preservatives. A service trial was therefore initiated of various profiles and coatings. Pacific silver fir and lodgepole pine lumber, both Mountain Pine Beetle-affected (MPB) and non-MPB, were used. Five different profiles were applied: rippled-flat edge, rippled to edge, ribbed-eased edge, ribbed-flat edge and centre, and flat radius edge. Two preservative systems were tested: coated or uncoated ACQ and a pigmented or coated carbon-based preservative. Five different types of fasteners were used, and the new boards were built into a deck in the Forintek courtyard. This report provides results after one year of exposure. All types of profiling significantly reduced check length compared to flat boards for both species, however, the pattern with the central flat strip showed checking down that strip. The ribbed profile was best for hiding the checks that did occur. Post-MPB pine, rippled-flat edge showed the lowest check length and depth compared to any other profile, for both heartwood up and sapwood up. Pacific silver fir, ribbed-eased edge showed the lowest check length compared to any other profile for both heartwood up and sapwood up. Pacific silver fir showed lower check depths than post-MPB-pine, for all profiles and orientations with one minor exception and lower check length on flat radius edge sapwood up. Heartwood up showed less checking than sapwood up in Post-MPB pine for all profiles, but the same was not true for Pacific Silver Fir. At this stage the effect of coating on checking was not statistically significant.
Decking - Durability
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Hybrid profiled decking innovation engine 2019 - 2020

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub52926
Author
Wong, Daniel
Stirling, Rod
Date
March 2020
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Hybrid Profiled Decking Innovation Engine 2019- 2020
Author
Wong, Daniel
Stirling, Rod
Date
March 2020
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Decking
Preservatives
Testing
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Decking markets in Canada lack options of hybrid designs and are generally limited to smooth 5/4” or 2x6” of either pressure treated wood, cedar, tropical hardwoods or wood plastic composites. Profiled decking has been unsuccessful in entering the Canadian market on a large scale even though globally it is more prevalent. This report looks to leverage FPInnovations’ expertise to identify opportunities to improve the stability, durability, performance and competitiveness of wood decking by combining profiling and treatment with additional non-wood materials. This information will be used to develop prototypes of novel wood-based decking products that would suit the needs of Canadian consumers as well as maintaining or expanding the solid wood decking market for Canadian producers. Six hybrid decking models were conceptualized to address market concerns about wood decking.
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Initiation of a field test to evaluate the effect of maintenance on the service life of wood decks

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42897
Author
Wong, Darrell
Stirling, Rod
Morris, Paul I.
Date
September 2012
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Wong, Darrell
Stirling, Rod
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
September 2012
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Decking
Preservatives
Testing
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 14
W-2954
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report outlines the initiation of a field test to evaluate the effect of maintenance on the service life of wood decks. Decks were untreated or treated with one of three preservatives and either uncoated, or coated with a semi-transparent stain or a solid colour stain. Twelve pairs of mini decks were installed at FPInnovations' 2665 East Mall location in July 2012. One replicate will receive maintenance as needed and the other will receive no maintenance. Annual ratings will determine the necessity of maintenance. By determining how maintenance contributes to durability performance of wood decks we hope to make appropriate recommendations on the use and care of exposed exterior wood products.
Decking
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Surface burning characteristics of glulam decking

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39806
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Date
March 2014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Fire
Testing
Decking
Building materials
Series Number
301007969
E-4860
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The key objective of this study was to evaluate the surface burning characteristics (flame spread rating) of glued-laminated timber (glulam) decking in accordance with CAN/ULC S102 test method [1]. This is part of a test series aimed at evaluating the flame spread rating of mass timber components, such as cross-laminated timber (CLT) and structural composite lumber (SCL). More specifically, this study is solely focused on mass timber assemblies that are thick enough to be treated theoretically as semi-infinite solids (thermally thick solids) as opposed to thermally-thin, which is typical of traditional combustible finish products. The tested specimen in this series meets the provisions related to “heavy timber construction”, per paragraph 3.1.4.7 of Division B of the National Building Code of Canada.
FLAMMABILITY
Glulam
Decking
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8 records – page 1 of 1.