Skip header and navigation

57 records – page 1 of 6.

Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
A l b e r tA FA c t s o n w o o d s e r i e s Balsam fir is a native tree species
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
Documents
Less detail

Analyse des niveaux de declassement cause par le sechage des sciages de dimensions specifiees d'epinette-pin-sapin

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2304
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38858
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38858
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
33 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Spruce Pine Fir
SPF
Seasoning degrade
Seasoning
Drying
Series Number
E-2934
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
French
Abstract
Seasoning - Degrade
Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) - Drying
Documents
Less detail

Analysis of degrade levels in drying eastern spruce-pine-fir dimension lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1786
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38303
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38303
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
32 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Spruce Pine Fir
SPF
Seasoning degrade
Seasoning
Drying
Series Number
3743K411
E-995
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Seasoning - Degrade
Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) - Drying
Documents
Less detail

Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
A l b e r tA FA c t s o n w o o d s e r i e s Balsam fir is a native tree species
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Documents
Less detail

The causes and occurence of warp in eastern spruce-pine-fir dimension lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1959
Author
Barbour, R.J.
Chauret, Gilles
Date
March 1993
Edition
38484
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
AND OCCURENCE OF WARP IN EASTERN SPRUCE-PINE-FIR DIMENSION LUMBER v.__________________________________J by R
Author
Barbour, R.J.
Chauret, Gilles
Date
March 1993
Edition
38484
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Spruce Pine Fir
SPF
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 37
3712K209
E-1403
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Eastern SPF producters experience an average value loss of $10 to $16/mbf due to drying degrade. A clear understanding of how wood characteristics influence warp will make it easier to effectively modify drying processes to reduce these losses. The goal of this study was to categorize green lumber according to its potential to warp, dry the lumber using a typical industrial kiln schedule and assess whether pieces that either warped or remained straight were correctly identified. Experimental material was a sample of 440 black spruce 8-foot 2x4's from four grain defect groups. These were : 1) control, no grain defects; 2) cross grain but no compression wood; 3) compression wood but no cross grain; and 4) both cross grain and compression wood. Methods used to select lumber with either a high or low potential to warp were successful. Warp was found to be related to the severity of compression wood and cross grain in each piece. Lumber without cross grain or compression wood dried with very little warp. Lumber with both cross grain and compression wood had the lowest quality after drying.
Spruce-Pine-Fir - Warp
SPF Lumber
Documents
Less detail

Causes of hemlock brownstain : final summary report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4377
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Kreber, B.
Date
July 1996
Edition
41152
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Kreber, B.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
July 1996
Edition
41152
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
6 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Stain fungal
Stain
Growth
Balsam
Fir
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 32
W-1379
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Discolourations of hem-fir, usually called hemlock brownstain, have become an economically important problem with the move towards increased kiln-drying of the wood species mixture and added-value products in which discolourations cannot be tolerated. These discolourations, clearly different from sapstain, can occur in several types and intensities and are a serious problem in high-value markets. Because little is known about their causes means for their control are still unavailable. Therefore fundamental research was initiated to elucidate the biology and chemistry of hemlock brownstain and to suggest control measures. A post graduate student was hired to undertake laboratory and field work as part of a Ph.D. program. The thesis subject was "the role of microorganisms in the phenomenon of hemlock brownstain". The thesis covers: a literature review; laboratory work to locate the stain and define its nature; a storage study of logs and lumber to monitor progress in development of brownstain; fungal isolation work and sap characterization studies; in vitro production of hemlock brownstain in wood and sap; and additional laboratory experiments to determine what factors influence the formation of the brownstain. In addition to the thesis research the role of bacteria in the formation of the stain was investigated in the laboratory and the ability of various chemicals, including fumigants, to prevent the stain was tested in small-scale field test. This report provides an overview of the findings and provides recommendations for future work. The experiments clearly demonstrated that a non-specific microflora can produce brownstain which led to the hypothesis that microorganisms could be involved in hemlock brownstain. Based on our knowledge of the coastal sawmilling industry a strategy of minimizing fungal infection and rapid handling of the tree breakdown into final wood products could probably be the best approach to help reduce the problem. In terms of future work we recommend that work to understand the mechanism of DDAC in mitigation of the browning take precedence in future work on hemlock brownstain.
Abies amabilis - Stains - Fungal
Tsuga heterophylla - Stains - Fungal
Fungi - Growth
Fungi - Wood staining
Stains - Fungal
Hem-Fir - Stains - Fungal
Documents
Less detail

Characteristics of Alberta's commercial tree species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub985
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1995
Edition
37360
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Contributor
Alberta Research Council
Date
March 1995
Edition
37360
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Alberta
British Columbia
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus banksiana
Pinus
Picea
Black spruce
Betula
Balsam
Aspen
Fir
Series Number
W-1150
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This publication characterizes nine commercial tree species of Alberta. Included are descriptions of the range and volume of each species, their wood properties, and present and potential manufacturing uses.
Populus balsamifera
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Abies balsamea
Abies lasiocarpa
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl var. latifolia
Picea mariana
Picea glauca
Documents
Less detail

Comparison of variable, constant and fluctuating pressure treating processes

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41134
Author
McFarling, S.M.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
or US standards, with a more treatable species mix such as hem-fir or pure amabilis fir (Morris 1995
Author
McFarling, S.M.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Pressure
Preservatives penetration
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Penetration
Balsam
Fir
Series Number
1743A231
W-1284
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report evaluates a new fluctuating pressure treating process, with a small pressure variation, that could be easily implemented into a treating plant with a control value. Coastal western hemlock being a relatively difficult species to impregnate was chosen as a suitable test species. Incised and unincised hemlock was used to relate to present industry practices.
Preservatives - Penetration
Preservation - Pressure processes
Tsuga heterophylla - Preservation
Abies amabilis - Preservation
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
Documents
Less detail

A computer visualization and analysis of wet-wood distribution and related processing alternatives for subalpine fir trees

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37634
Author
Alkan, S.
Date
October 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
and Related Processing Alternatives for Subalpine Fir Trees by Sencer Alkan Resource Characterization
Author
Alkan, S.
Date
October 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wetwoods
Simulation
Scanning electron microscopy
Scanners
Grading
Balsam
Automatic control
Fir
Series Number
1020
W-1911
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A software, by which virtual 3-D subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa [Hook] Nutt) logs can be re-created, visualized, and theoretically sawn an infinite number of times, was developed. The software also facilitates obtaining data for determining quantitative variation of clear wood, wet-wood, and knot patterns within the tree stems. Results based on the quantitative calculations showed that there are two general patterns of wet-wood within the sub-alpine fir stems. The first pattern is called wet-pocket and the second pattern is called wet-streak. Wet-streak patterns are generally confined to the medullary-inner heartwood regions in the outer heartwood and heartwood-sapwood transition zones of the tree stems, mostly associated with dead knots. Wet-pocket patterns consist of portions occurring in mid regions in close proximity to the base and regions mostly around partially dead knots of the tree stems. Both wet-wood patterns usually converge at the nodes and extend along the branch axes, forming a connection with the exterior boundary only around branches. Numerical analysis of the results showed that the volume of both types is more prevalent in the lower-stem regions, becoming less prevalent towards the living crown. The radial extension of wet-wood types with radial distance from the tree centre was variable, with a maximum diameter of 22 cm. Both wet-wood volumes increased with increasing tree age and diameter class independent of age. However, the percentage of total wet-wood volume decreased with increasing DBH, increased stem height and showed no clear trend with age class. Total amounts of wet-wood ranged up to 27 per cent in individual stems. A weak relationship was found between dead knot-pattern and wet-streak pattern volumes, while a moderate high relationship was found between partially dead knot and wet-pocket volumes. A weak relationship was found between external tree characteristics and both wet-wood distributions. As a result, some promising trends emerged for a better understanding of wet-wood and knot pattern variations as influenced by tree stem locations, DBH, and age. The developed software may offer a compelling technique for assisting subalpine fir log processing decisions. However, the destructive data collection method used in this study is “error-prone”. Therefore, an interesting alternative would be the use of more accurate non-destructive scanning techniques, such as CT-scanning, to verify the trends identified here through more deliberate sampling at other forest sites. A new study is already underway to meet this need.
Moisture content
Computer simulation
Abies lasiocarpa
Scanners, Electronic
Defects - Detection
Grading - Automation
Wetwood
Documents
Less detail

Correlation study of in-grade compression project - spruce-pine-fir : report of data

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38536
Author
Bellosillo, S.B.
Date
May 1984
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Ë IS 3 3 .p ôF CORRELATION STUDY OF IN-GRADE COMPRESSION PROJECT - SPRUCE-PINE-FIR (Report
Author
Bellosillo, S.B.
Date
May 1984
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Testing
Pinus
Spruce
Spruce Pine Fir
SPF
Series Number
5065877
E-1533
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
The objectives of this part of the project is to provide compression strength data: 1) To be able to correlate fesults obtained using "short" and "long" specimens in the in-grade compression testing program. The U.S. in-grade testing program is based on tests of two "short" specimens cut from full length dimensional lumber. 2) To be able to evaluate the influence of rate of compressi ve deformation in parallel-to-grain compression testing.
Spruce-Pine-Fir
SPF
Ingrade Testing
Documents
Less detail

57 records – page 1 of 6.