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125 records – page 1 of 13.

Advanced technologies to improve wood penetration : preliminary screening of fungi with potential for bioincising

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42470
Author
Dale, Angela
Symons, Paul D.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
November 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Dale, Angela
Symons, Paul D.
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
November 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservation
Growth
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FPI 117W
W-2855
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A major constraint to the Canadian wood preservation industry in both domestic and export markets is the difficulty of penetrating Canadian wood species with preservatives. FPInnovations has put considerable effort into various forms of improved mechanical incising but these have not been adopted by the industry due to adverse effects on throughput and appearance of the final product. Recently, work in Europe has shown promising results from biological incising using white-rot fungi that colonize wood relatively rapidly but decay slowly. The use of European isolates of fungi in North America may be constrained by phytosanitary concerns. This report covers an experiment to screen North American isolates of white-rot fungi for potential as biological control agents. A modification of the soil-block test method was used to evaluate the ability of a range of fungi to improve permeability without affecting strength properties. Wood samples were exposed to the fungi for zero, two, four and six week time increments and were then treated with a 1.5% ACQ-D solution. Preservative uptake was calculated based on change in weight before and after treatment. Two isolates of Dichomitus squalens were found that dramatically increased preservative uptake. These samples were tested for strength loss and preservative penetration. Spruce samples exposed to D. squalens isolate 78A for six weeks were completely penetrated with preservative (19 mm depth) in all six samples. D. squalens 78B also showed promising results in pine and spruce samples based on uptake and penetration data. No stiffness loss was detected in any of these samples based on results from the crushing tests.
Preservation - Incising
Fungi - Growth
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Basic wood properties of second-growth sitka spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5534
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
von Schilling, B.
Sen, P.
Date
January 1993
Edition
37459
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
von Schilling, B.
Sen, P.
Contributor
British Columbia. Ministry of Forests. Queen Charlotte Forest District.
Date
January 1993
Edition
37459
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
38 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Second growth
Picea
Physical properties
Mechanical properties
Growth
Series Number
W-1446
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The basic wood properties of 45-year-old second-growth sitka spruce were examined to determine if rapid growth produces poor wood quality. Five dominant and codominant trees were sampled from each of four stands with stocking densities of 520, 640, 1080, and 1520 stems/ha. Stem size, extent of live crown, yearly wood relative density trends, and longitudinal shrinkage were measured.
Picea sitchensis - Mechanical properties
Picea sitchensis - Physical properties
Second growth
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Basic wood properties of second-growth western hemlock

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5879
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Munro, B.D.
Gordon, J.R.
Date
March 1998
Edition
41165
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
BASIC WOOD PROPERTIES OF SECOND-GROWTH WESTERN HEMLOCK by L.A. Jozsa, B.D. Munro and J.R
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Munro, B.D.
Gordon, J.R.
Date
March 1998
Edition
41165
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
51 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Second growth
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Physical properties
Growth
Series Number
Special Publication ; SP-38
W-1444
Location
Victoria, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report describes some of the background and results of work done to date on second-growth western hemlock basic wood properties at Forintek Canada Corp. The B.C. Ministry of Forests (BCMOF) Research Branch, UBC Forestry Faculty and PAPRICAN were the other cooperating agencies on this project and they investigated live crown/tree growth relationships, strength properties of small clears, and pulping properties, respectively. Properties that were assessed by Forintek, both within and between trees include: relative density of wood, shrinkage, moisture content and relative proportion of heartwood-sapwood, bark thickness, content and distribution of compression wood, incidence and degree of spiral grain, incidence and severity of brown stain, and strength properties of small cleear bending samples. Naturally grown 90-year-old western hemlock stands represent much of the emerging timber supply in the B.C. coastal forest region. Information characterizing the commercial quality of this resource is needed now to support processing and marketing decisions and for product promotion. In addition, the BCMOF and industry members are making stand management decisions today which will determine the future quality of western hemlock. We can reduce the risk of making wrong investment decisions by providing information on how different growing conditions (e.g., biogeoclimatic zone, site, stand density, thinning) affect second-growth wood quality.
Second growth
Tsuga heterophylla - Physical properties
Growth - Influence on quality
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Bending strength and stiffness of log stringers for bridges on forest roads: tests of second-growth Douglas-fir and western hemlock logs

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5843
Author
Bennett, Douglas M.
Modesto, R.
Ewart, Jim
Jokai, Rob
Parker, Seamus
Clark, Marv
Date
January 2005
Edition
40689
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bennett, Douglas M.
Modesto, R.
Ewart, Jim
Jokai, Rob
Parker, Seamus
Clark, Marv
Date
January 2005
Edition
40689
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Test methods
Mechanical properties
Second growth
Ruptures
Procedures
Logs
Sample
Growth
Design
British Columbia
Bending
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 5, No. 42
Language
English
Abstract
In order to provide bridge designers with better information, International Forest Products Limited (Interfor) asked the Forest Engineering Resarach Institute of Canada (FERIC) to evaluate the bending strength and stiffness of log stringers used for constructing bridges on forest roads in coastal British Columbia. Given the lack of definitive standards for testing this material, FERIC developed a field-based test procedure and designed a test facility for destructive testing of full-size, whole-log stringers obtained from second-growth stands. Sixteen coastal Douglas-fir and twelve western hemlock logs were tested in 2003. This report describes the test procedure and methods of analysis, presents the log bending strength and stiffness results, and makes recommendations regarding future testing.
Bridge design
Log stringers
Bending strength
Modulus of rupture
Modulus of elasticity
Test procedure
Second-growth logs
Douglas fir
Western hemlock
Coastal British Columbia
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Best practices guide to minimize mold growth on wood products from manufacture to end use

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42463
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Gignac, Manon
Yang, D.-Q.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
guide
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Uzunovic, Adnan
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Gignac, Manon
Yang, D.-Q.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
guide
Research report
Physical Description
32 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Prevention
Growth
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 38
W-2826
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This guide is intended to discuss mold-related issues and to assist the industry in the delivery of clean, mold-free products to the marketplace. Mold continues to be undesirable on wood products and can cause rejection of shipments by the customers and economic losses to the industry. This report provides an historic perspective on mold, defines mold and discusses why it became a major issue in the marketplace and how this relates to wood products. The main factors required for mold growth and expansion are discussed, as are methods of limiting mold growth. The best method of mold control is moisture control, which includes initial drying and keeping wood products dry. Specifically we give best practice guidelines for controlling mold on logs, lumber, plywood/veneers, other composite panel products, wood chips/residues, and for wood products in service (buildings). Lumber is one of the key products of the wood industry and several specific guidelines in regard to mold control for lumber are available and covered in depth. This includes air-drying, kiln-drying, phytosanitary heat treatment, and chemical prophylactic treatment of green lumber. Some circumstances where control of moisture is not feasible will require either chemical treatments or water barriers to prevent mold growth. There is also a special section on lumber packaging and wrapping, and water repellents. Finally, the report reviews existing guidelines for mold cleaning and remediation.
Mould growth
Moulds - Prevention
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Biomass productivity and wood quality of white spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5456
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
March 1985
Edition
36998
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
100 years of growth of a 1 cm thick breast-height disk. Assuming that s i t e conditions were i d e
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
March 1985
Edition
36998
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
43 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Picea
Growth
Series Number
CFS Contract 02-80-12-001
W-188
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Picea glauca - Density
Growth - Influence of climate
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Biomass productivity of white spruce in Alberta and Manitoba

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5480
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37101
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
on the f i r s t 100 years of growth (the Alberta NWT transect sampling s i t e s were on the average
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Bramhall, Paul Arthur
Johnson, S.G.
Date
August 1984
Edition
37101
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Picea
Growth
Biomass
Alberta
Series Number
CFS No. 27
Contract No. 02-80-56-011
W-319
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Picea glauca - Growth
Biomass - Alberta
Biomass - Manitoba
Dendrochronology
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Bunch yarding with radio-controlled chokers in coastal British Columbia second-growth timber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43492
Author
MacDonald, A.J.
Date
1990
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
MacDonald, A.J.
Date
1990
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Second growth
Series Number
FO Special Report
Language
English
Abstract
Two Madill 044 Yarding cranes were monitored over a three-week period in 1989 in a coastal British Columbia stand were chokers were used for yarding mechanically felled and bunched second-growth timber. Productivity, costs and profitability of the choker system were determined and compared to using grapple systems on the same yarding cranes.
Second-growth forests
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Carte routière pour l'industrie canadienne des produits à valeur ajoutée en bois

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2517
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Fell, David
Laytner, F.
Date
September 2006
Edition
39103
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Fell, David
Laytner, F.
Contributor
Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Date
September 2006
Edition
39103
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
176 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Wood
Utilization
Secondary woods
Processing
Markets
Growth
Canada
Series Number
Valeur au bois no FCC 51
5447
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Le programme Valeur au bois a été mis sur pied en mai 2002 afin de fournir des solutions technologiques aux fabricants de produits du bois à valeur ajoutée de partout au pays. Le volet Recherche du programme a permis de réunir des chercheurs de Forintek Canada Corp., ainsi que de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, de l’Université Laval, de l’Université de Toronto et de l’Université du Nouveau-Brunswick pour examiner les sujets de recherche essentiels au succès à court terme et à long terme de l’industrie. Le volet Transfert de la technologie a contribué à la création d’un réseau pancanadien de spécialistes dans la transformation du bois qui jouent un double rôle. En effet, ils se chargent de diffuser les résultats de recherche et ils aident l’industrie à prendre des décisions d’ordre opérationnel, technique et stratégique. Comme le moment du renouvellement du programme Valeur au bois approche, le SCF a confié à Forintek le mandat de produire une carte routière pour l’industrie canadienne des produits du bois à valeur ajoutée qui permettra d’atteindre quatre grands objectifs :
Déterminer les priorités et les besoins en technologie des sous-secteurs de l’industrie du bois à valeur ajoutée pour les cinq à dix prochaines années;
Trouver des moyens appropriés pour transférer les résultats des recherches à l’industrie;
Définir les objectifs et les mesures de succès des activités de recherche et de transfert de la technologie;
Formuler des recommandations et dresser un plan d’action pour favoriser l’expansion de l’industrie du bois à valeur ajoutée. La carte routière portait sur des domaines de recherche ciblés prenant en considération que les produits à valeur ajoutée se trouvent dans le vaste contexte des chaînes de valeur industrielles. Des questions telles que l’approvisionnement en matériaux, la conception et la mise au point de produits, la technologie et la fabrication, les renseignements sur les marchés et l’accès à ceux-ci, les compétences et la formation, ainsi que de nombreux autres sujets ont été examinées. Six sous-secteurs de l’industrie des produits d’apparence ont été ciblés dans la carte routière : les portes et fenêtres, les revêtements de sol, les meubles de maison, les meubles de bureau, les armoires et comptoirs de cuisine, ainsi que les menuiseries préfabriquées et les menuiseries architecturales. Les produits du bois d’ingénierie et les pièces de charpentes préfabriquées entraient dans la catégorie des produits structuraux. L’information recueillie pour constituer la carte routière a été fournie par plus de cent spécialistes et représentants de l’industrie, surtout dans le cadre d’interviews en personne. Des rencontres individuelles ont été organisées avec des acteurs clés de l’industrie afin : a) de bien comprendre les tendances et les dynamiques intrinsèques qui animent chaque secteur; b) de définir les besoins en recherche et les priorités de l’industrie. Des représentants des partenaires du milieu universitaire ont été invités à passer en revue le résumé des questions issues de la consultation de l’industrie et ont participé à une discussion en table ronde en vue de dégager et d’évaluer des stratégies pour satisfaire les besoins de l’industrie. Il ressort des consultations de l’industrie que le secteur des produits du bois d’apparence et des pièces de charpentes doit faire l’objet d’innovation pour être en mesure de réagir à un certain nombre d’éléments moteurs clés.
Canadian woods - Utilization
Industrial growth - Canada
Secondary wood processing - Markets
Technology forecasting
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Causes of hemlock brownstain : final summary report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4377
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Kreber, B.
Date
July 1996
Edition
41152
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Kreber, B.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
July 1996
Edition
41152
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
6 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Stain fungal
Stain
Growth
Balsam
Fir
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 32
W-1379
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Discolourations of hem-fir, usually called hemlock brownstain, have become an economically important problem with the move towards increased kiln-drying of the wood species mixture and added-value products in which discolourations cannot be tolerated. These discolourations, clearly different from sapstain, can occur in several types and intensities and are a serious problem in high-value markets. Because little is known about their causes means for their control are still unavailable. Therefore fundamental research was initiated to elucidate the biology and chemistry of hemlock brownstain and to suggest control measures. A post graduate student was hired to undertake laboratory and field work as part of a Ph.D. program. The thesis subject was "the role of microorganisms in the phenomenon of hemlock brownstain". The thesis covers: a literature review; laboratory work to locate the stain and define its nature; a storage study of logs and lumber to monitor progress in development of brownstain; fungal isolation work and sap characterization studies; in vitro production of hemlock brownstain in wood and sap; and additional laboratory experiments to determine what factors influence the formation of the brownstain. In addition to the thesis research the role of bacteria in the formation of the stain was investigated in the laboratory and the ability of various chemicals, including fumigants, to prevent the stain was tested in small-scale field test. This report provides an overview of the findings and provides recommendations for future work. The experiments clearly demonstrated that a non-specific microflora can produce brownstain which led to the hypothesis that microorganisms could be involved in hemlock brownstain. Based on our knowledge of the coastal sawmilling industry a strategy of minimizing fungal infection and rapid handling of the tree breakdown into final wood products could probably be the best approach to help reduce the problem. In terms of future work we recommend that work to understand the mechanism of DDAC in mitigation of the browning take precedence in future work on hemlock brownstain.
Abies amabilis - Stains - Fungal
Tsuga heterophylla - Stains - Fungal
Fungi - Growth
Fungi - Wood staining
Stains - Fungal
Hem-Fir - Stains - Fungal
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125 records – page 1 of 13.