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Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Name: Larix laricina Common Names: Eastern Larch, American Larch, Alaska Larch, Hackmatack Tamarack
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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An Exploratory study of the properties of fast grown jack pine and european larch in eastern Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38108
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
123 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Trees
Pinus banksiana
Pinus
Larix
Canada
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 24/85-86
Project no.55-12-002
E-336
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Trees, Intensively Managed
Tree Crops - Eastern Canada - Properties
Jack pine
European Larch
Pinus banksiana
Larix decidua
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Density evaluation of western larch and grafted ramets of lodgepole pine parent trees

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36946
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1989
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1989
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Trees
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Larix
British Columbia
Series Number
CFS No. 32
contract no. 5512X156
W-656
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Larix occidentalis - Density
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Breeding
Trees - Improvement - British Columbia
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Density evaluation of western larch parent trees in B.C. tree improvement program

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37267
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1992
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1992
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Larix
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 29
Contract no. 1212K010
W-906
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Pith-to-bark increment cores were obtained at breast height of 225 western larch parent trees from the interior of British Columbia. The cores were divided into juvenile (first 15 annual growth rings from the pith) and mature wood sections (from growth ring 16 to the bark) and assessed separately for wood density. The mature wood had an average wood density of 0.493 gms/cm3. This was significantly higher than the density of the juvenile wood which averaged 0.468 gms/cm3. The Spearman Rank Correlation between the mature and juvenile wood densities was 0.58 and highly significant (p = 0.0001).
Larix occidentalis
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Drying performance of tamarack using the superheated steam/vacuum process

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42210
Author
Normand, D.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
/Vacuum Process Summary The purpose of this study on tamarack (Larix laricina
Author
Normand, D.
Contributor
Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
22 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Vacuum
Steam
Seasoning vacuum drying
Seasoning steam
Seasoning kiln drying
Seasoning
Larix
Drying
Kilns
Series Number
3680
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The purpose of this study on tamarack (Larix laricina) was to propose a drying technique adapted to the end use, to document the colour change after drying, and to assess the rot resistance of the various drying processes used. This study was divided into two parts. In the first part, 5/4’’ thick lumber was dried using superheated steam/vacuum (SS/V) drying in order to compare drying results with the results of a study conducted at Université Laval. The Université Laval study compared drying results obtained with three conventional drying schedules: high temperature (115 °C), elevated temperature (90 °C), and standard temperature (82 °C). The study compared drying time, final quality, colour change, and rot resistance. The second part of the study involved drying 7/4’’ thick lumber using SS/V drying. It was clearly shown that drying process does not affect rot resistance of tamarack. However, drying process and operating temperature affect colour after drying. High temperature drying resulted in the greatest post-drying colour change. The SS/V process provided post-drying results that closely matched those before drying. The drying time obtained from the best SS/V test, with a time/quality trade-off, was longer than in the Université Laval high-temperature conventional test (0.9 factor). Compared to conventional drying schedules, the SS/V process was 1.4 times faster than the elevated temperature schedule, 2 times faster than the standard temperature schedule, and 3.4 times faster than schedules used in the industry. Drying times required to reach a final moisture content of approximately 12% in the four 7/4” lumber tests ranged from 132.2 hours to 175 hours. Compared to current industrial results, drying by SS/V is approximately 2.6 to 3.1 faster. Warping was better controlled during the 7/4’’ tests. Winter conditions during the tests made it difficult to maintain conditions in the SS/V kiln. Nonetheless, the use of concrete dead loads on the charges and high temperature conventional kiln drying appear to provide good possibilities for Canadian manufacturers.
NRCan Value to Wood Program which discusses Larix laricina; Seasoning - Vacuum, Steam and Kiln drying
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Exploratory study of the properties of fast grown jack pine and European larch in eastern Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37154
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood quality
Wood
Second growth
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Pinus banksiana
Pinus
Physical properties
Larix
Growth
Series Number
CFS No. 24
W-404
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Second growth
Wood quality
Pinus banksiana - Physical properties
Larix decidua - Physical properties
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Field tests of naturally durable species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41366
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
January 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
January 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Thuja plicata
Thuja occidentalis
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Pinus
Larix
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 14;1054
W-2388
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Field tests of six wood species reputed to be naturally durable were installed in ground and out-of-ground contact in the autumn of 2004 and spring 2005 at four test sites in North America. Decay results for the ground contact tests are reported after one and two years of exposure. Although it is too early to draw conclusions regarding relative performance of the different species, as expected samples containing sapwood are deteriorating faster than those containing all heartwood. There is no obvious difference at this point between decay in old-growth and second-growth samples.
Thuja plicata - Durability
Chamaecyparis nootkatensis - Durability
Thuja occidentalis - Durability
Larix occidentalis - Durability
Larix laricina - Durability
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Durability
Pinus ponderosa - Durability
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Field tests of naturally durable species : results after five years

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6004
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Ingram, Janet K.
Larkin, G.
Laks, P.
Date
February 2011
Edition
42459
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Ingram, Janet K.
Larkin, G.
Laks, P.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
February 2011
Edition
42459
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Thuja plicata
Wood decay
Thuja occidentalis
Resistance
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Pinus
Larix
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 14
W-2822
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Field tests of six wood species reputed to have a range of natural durability were installed in ground and out-of-ground contact in the autumn of 2004 and spring 2005 at four test sites in Canada and in the USA, in collaboration with Michigan Technological University. Decay results are reported after five years of exposure. The test sites with the fastest ground-contact decay rate were Florida and Hawaii, while the fastest above-ground decay rate was in Hawaii. In ground contact, yellow-cedar and western redcedar were the most durable, followed by eastern white cedar, larch, Douglas-fir, and tamarack. Above ground in Hawaii, yellow-cedar and western redcedar were the most durable, followed by Douglas-fir and tamarack, then eastern white cedar and larch. An equation was fit to these data. The presence of sapwood appeared to have more impact on the rate of decay in the above-ground test than in ground contact. There was no substantial difference between decay in old-growth and second-growth samples either in ground contact or above ground. In one species the presence of a coating applied to decking had some protective effect against decay.
Decay - Natural resistance to
Thuja plicata - Durability
Chamaecyparis nootkatensis - Durability
Thuja occidentalis - Durability
Larix occidentalis - Durability
Larix laricina - Durability
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Durability
Pinus ponderosa - Durability
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Influence of thinning on wood density and branch size of young western larch

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5543
Author
Sauter, U.H.
Gonzalez, J.S.
Gordon, J.R.
Schmidt, W.C.
Jaquish, B.C.
Date
March 1999
Edition
37489
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
. Western Division 2665 East JVlall Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5 (604) 224-3221 Western l a rch (Larix
Author
Sauter, U.H.
Gonzalez, J.S.
Gordon, J.R.
Schmidt, W.C.
Jaquish, B.C.
Date
March 1999
Edition
37489
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
21 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Treatment
Silviculture
Larix
Growth
Series Number
Technical Report No. 18
W-1544
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) is one of three native Larix species in North America, besides subalpine larch (Larix lyallii Parl.) and tamarack (Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch). It easily reaches 50 m in total height. High wood density and strength usually characterize its wood. In British Columbia, western larch represents a minor component of the provincial timber supply. Due to extensive western larch plantations in southeastern British Columbia it promises to become an important wood species in this region. Throughout most of western larches' natural range, existing stands originated from natural regeneration following wildfires, and are often overstocked. Therefore, early reductions of stand densities by precommercial thinning became an important management tool to establish stabilized stands and to concentrate stand growth potential on fewer vigorous, well-formed trees. This process of maximizing total stand value rather than maximizing yield can be completed by later commercial thinning and artificial pruning. The intent of this study was to provide basic information on the relationship between tree spacing and the two major wood quality parameters wood density and branch size to support stand management decisions. From four 43/45-year-old western larch experimental stands in northwest Montana, 618 sample trees were chosen representing different stocking levels ranging from 270 to 6700 trees per hectare. From two pith-to-bark cores, taken at breast height for each tree, density profiles were obtained using Forintek's x-ray densitometer. Additionally, the largest branch diameters in 4 m-stem height and below in four selected plots on three sites were measured and analysed. The sample trees showed a strong relationship between width of spacing and tree height and diameter breast height. As expected, trees in the widest spaced plots grew the fastest. Despite large differences in diameter growth, no significant differences in average wood density occurred between spacings. A second moderate thinning on the best sites clearly showed that enhancing the wood density of western larch is possible. As expected the branch diameter increases nearly linearly with the width of the initial spacing in western larch stands. But for the most valuable part of the tree, the branch sizes do not exceed 20 mm even when a wide spacing as 4.6 by 4.6 m is applied. The overall high relative wood density level of about 0.52, which is the highest average wood density of the commercial softwood in North America, and a reasonable knot size confirm that western larch from managed stands remains a valuable tree species in future markets.
Larix occidentalis - Density
Larix occidentalis - Growth
Growth - Influence of silvicultural treatment
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Machining and related mechanical properties of 15 B.C. wood species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5541
Author
Williams, D.
Morris, R.
Date
August 1998
Edition
37485
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Vancouver 29.0 0.50 W. Larch Larix occidentalis Nelson 16.0 0.60 W. Redcedar Thuja plicata Vancouver 30.3
Author
Williams, D.
Morris, R.
Contributor
Forest Renewal BC.
Date
August 1998
Edition
37485
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Utilization
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Thuja plicata
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Picea
Mechanical properties
Larix
British Columbia
Betula
Balsam
Aspen
Fir
Series Number
Special Publication ; SP-39
W-1524
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
ISSN
ISSN 0824-2119
Abstract
The recent emphasis on producing higher value secondary wood products in British Columbia requires some changes in the way manufacturers process wood. A basic requirement in assessing whether a wood species is suitable for use as a value-added product is an understanding of the wood's machining characteristics. The objective of this study was to determine the planing, turning, shaping, boring, mortising, sanding, and fastening characteristics in clear wood sections for 15 B.C. softwood and hardwood species: 1. Amabilis Fir, 2. Douglas fir, 3. Lodgepole pine, 4. Sitka spruce, 5. Subalpine fir, 6. Western hemlock, 7. Western larch, 8. Western redcedar, 9. Western white pine, 10. Western white spruce, 11. Yellow cedar, 12. Black cottonwood, 13. Red alder, 14. Trembling aspen, 15. Western white birch. This information will aid B.C. secondary wood processors in the design and manufacture of higher value products, and help promote B.C. species and products in domestic and export markets. The study compares the machining properties of individual species within B.C.'s SPF and hem-fir groups demonstrating the benefits of sorting by individual species. In addition, the machining properties of B.C.'s under-utilized species (e.g., trembling aspen, black cottonwood) are compared to those of well established softwood species (e.g., Douglas-fir, western hemlock). Finally, the study determined the average force necessary to withdraw two types of fasteners (nail and screw) from each of the wood species. A tabular presentation of the results is included for easy comparison between species.
Mechanical properties - Machining
British Columbia woods - Utilization
Abies amabilis - Mechanical properties
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Mechanical properties
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Mechanical properties
Picea sitchensis - Mechanical properties
Abies lasiocarpa - Mechanical properties
Tsuga heterophylla - Mechanical properties
Larix occidentalis - Mechanical properties
Thuja plicata - Mechanical properties
Pinus monticola - Mechanical properties
Picea glauca - Mechanical properties
Chamaecyparis nootkatensis - Mechanical properties
Populus trichocarpa - Mechanical properties
Alnus rubra - Mechanical properties
Populus tremuloides - Mechanical properties
Betula papyrifera - Mechanical properties
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16 records – page 1 of 2.