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Construction moisture management, nail-laminated timber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8035
Author
Wang, Jieying
Date
March 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
. While “S-Dry” dimension lumber has moisture content (MC) of around 19% or lower when it is produced
Author
Wang, Jieying
Date
March 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
6 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Laminate product
Performance
Wood frame
Moisture content
Series Number
InfoNote 2021 N 15
Language
English
Abstract
Nail-laminated timber (NLT) is a large built-up member often used as interior structural members for floors, roofs, walls, and elevator/stair shafts. Because prolonged wetting of wood may cause staining, mould, excessive dimensional change (sometimes enough to fail fasteners), and even result in decay and loss of strength, construction moisture is an important consideration when building with NLT. This document aims to provide technical information to help architects, engineers, and builders assess the potential for wetting of NLT during building construction and identify appropriate actions to mitigate the risks.
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Decision aids for durable wood construction : review and redirection

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41201
Author
O'Connor, J.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
of the assembly such as building paper and flashing, to enforce the building code requirement that the moisture
Author
O'Connor, J.
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Building construction
Planning
Design
Moisture content
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 19
Project No. 1052
W-1611
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The project Decision Aids for Durable Wood Construction underwent a major review with the hiring of a new project leader (O'Connor) in September 1998. In consultation with the project liaisons, the work on this project since its start-up in 1993 was examined, the primary task of developing a computer-based tool for the building industry was reconsidered, the context of worldwide research into building envelope moisture failures was reviewed, and a revised project plan was proposed. Decision Aids was a self-contained project for its first three years, with efforts concentrated on knowledge acquisition, expert system experimentation and other foundation work for development of a computer tool. With a rise of interest in building envelope moisture failures across North America and elsewhere, Decision Aids activity shifted into a mode that was reactive to projects and events external to Forintek. This was necessary due to the level of effort external agencies, media and research labs were devoting to the topic. In particular, where the actions of outsiders began to have an influence on wood in construction, we found it critical to participate in order to ensure the fair and correct treatment of wood. The new project leader was asked to review the project and either get the project back on its original track or suggest a redirection. The project goal, to assist end users in best application of wood, was determined to be sound. In addition, the project leader recommended that resources continue to be allocated to participation in outside research efforts and other related activities. However, it was recommended that the project objective to develop computer-based decision tools be reassessed. Instead, the project leader recommended a course of action focused on tasks both shorter in term and smaller in scope, which will enable Forintek to deliver results better tailored to the immediate needs of industry in a time of building envelope moisture failure "crisis." The new project plan is split into two areas: 1) address building envelope moisture failures that are due to existing information not arriving in the right hands (i.e., a technology transfer problem); and 2) address building envelope moisture failures that are due to a lack of information (i.e., a research problem). The technology transfer area will create a formal plan for communication to the building industry, will enable Forintek to experiment with developing pathways to that new target audience, and will provide the means for the wood industry to provide helpful durability information to the public through a relatively neutral third party (Forintek). The research area will explore opportunities for limited scope experiments or collaborative field studies of wood system durability performance, with the intent of verifying or modifying codes, standards and best practice guides.
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Design example : designing for openings in wood diaphragm

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6030
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Date
October 2013
Edition
42999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Contributor
Canadian Wood Council
Date
October 2013
Edition
42999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Residential construction
Design
Moisture content
Series Number
W-3080
Language
English
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Design example : design of stacked multi-storey wood-based shear walls using a mechanics-based approach

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6034
Author
Newfield, G.
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Date
October 2013
Edition
43003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Newfield, G.
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Contributor
Canadian Wood Council
Date
October 2013
Edition
43003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Residential construction
Design
Moisture content
Walls
Series Number
W-3084
Language
English
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Design example : wood diaphragm on reinforced CMU shearwalls

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6029
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Date
October 2013
Edition
42998
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Contributor
Canadian Wood Council
Date
October 2013
Edition
42998
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Residential construction
Design
Moisture content
Walls
Series Number
W-3079
Language
English
Abstract
N/A
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Design example : wood diaphragm using envelope method

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6031
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Date
October 2013
Edition
43000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Contributor
Canadian Wood Council
Date
October 2013
Edition
43000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Residential construction
Design
Moisture content
Series Number
W-3081
Language
English
Abstract
N/A
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Diaphragm flexibility

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6028
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Date
October 2013
Edition
42997
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Contributor
Canadian Wood Council
Date
October 2013
Edition
42997
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
7 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Residential construction
Design
Moisture content
Walls
Series Number
W-3078
Language
English
Abstract
Diaphragms are essential to transfer lateral forces in the plane of the diaphragms to supporting shear walls underneath. As the distribution of lateral force to shear walls is dependent on the relative stiffness/flexibility of diaphragm to the shear walls, it is critical to know the stiffness of both diaphragm and shear walls, so that appropriate lateral force applied on shear walls can be assigned. In design, diaphragms can be treated as flexible, rigid or semi-rigid. For a diaphragm that is designated as flexible, the in-plane forces can be assumed to be distributed to the shear walls according to the tributary areas associated with each shear wall. For a diaphragm that is designated as rigid, the loads are assumed to be distributed according to the relative stiffness of the shear walls, with consideration of additional shear force due to torsion for seismic design. In reality, diaphragm is neither purely flexible nor completely rigid, and is more realistically to be treated as semi-rigid. In this case, computer analysis using either plate or diagonal strut elements can be used and the load-deflection properties of the diaphragm will result in force distribution somewhere between the flexible and rigid models. However, alternatively envelope approach which takes the highest forces from rigid and flexible assumptions can be used as a conservative estimation in lieu of computer analysis.
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L'eau et la durabilité : fiche technique sur la performance de la construction à ossature de bois

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42416
Contributor
Forintek Canada Corp.
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Société centrale d'hypothèques et de logement (SCHL)
Date
April 2000
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
Contributor
Forintek Canada Corp.
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Société centrale d'hypothèques et de logement (SCHL)
Date
April 2000
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Moisture content
Wood decay
Series Number
Fact Sheet on Wood in Construction = Fiche technique sur le bois dans la construction
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Moisture - Control
Moisture - Prevention
Buildings - Houses - Moisture content
Decay - Prevention
Building construction - Design
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Field measurement of vertical movement and roof moisture performance of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre : instrumentation and first year's performance

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub44205
Author
Wang, Jieying
Date
March 2015
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
PDF
Ajoutez cet article à votre liste de sélections pour demander le PDF - Add this item to your selection list to request the PDF
Author
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
March 2015
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
British Columbia
Building construction
Laminate product
Moisture content
Performance
Test methods
Series Number
301008940
Language
English
Abstract
Two of the major topics of interest to those designing taller and larger wood buildings are the susceptibility to differential movement and the likelihood of mass timber components drying slowly after they are wetted during construction. The Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George, British Columbia provides a unique opportunity for non-destructive testing and monitoring to measure the ‘As Built’ performance of a relatively tall mass timber building. Field measurements also provide performance data to support regulatory and market acceptance of wood-based systems in tall and large buildings. This report first describes instrumentation to measure the vertical movement of selected glulam columns and cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls in this building. Three locations of glulam columns and one CLT wall of the core structure were selected for measuring vertical movement along with the environmental conditions (temperature and humidity) in the immediate vicinity. The report then describes instrumentation to measure the moisture changes in the wood roof structure. Six locations in the roof were selected and instrumented for measuring moisture changes in the wood as well as the local environmental conditions. All sensors and instrumentations, with the exception of one, were installed and became operational in the middle of March 2014, after the roof sheathing was installed. The other instrumentation was installed in July 2014. This report presents performance of the building during its first year as measured from topping out of the structure. In the end, the one-year period covers six months of construction and six months of occupancy. This is the first year of a planned five-year monitoring. The first year’s monitoring showed that the wood inside the building had reached moisture content (MC) of about 4-6% in the heating season, from an initial MC of 13% during construction. Glulam columns were extremely dimensionally stable given the changes in MC and loading conditions. With a height of over 5 m and 6 m, respectively, the two glulam columns measured in this study showed very small amounts of vertical movement, each below 2 mm. The cumulative shortening of the six glulam columns along the height of the building would be about 8 mm, not taking into account deformation at connection details or effects of reduced loads on upper floors. The CLT wall was found to be also dimensionally stable along the height of the building. The measurements showed that the entire CLT wall, from Floor 1 to Floor 6, would shorten about 14 mm. The CLT floors, however, had considerable shrinkage in the thickness direction, and therefore should be taken into consideration in the design and construction of components, such as curtain walls, which are connected to the floors. In terms of the roof performance, two locations, both with a wet concrete layer poured above the plywood sheathing, showed wetness during construction but dried slowly afterwards. The good drying performance must be attributed to the interior ventilation function designed for the roof assemblies by integrating strapping between the sheathing and the mass timber beams below. Overall this monitoring study shows the differential movement occurring among the glulam columns and the CLT wall is small and the wood roof has good drying performance.
PDF
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Field monitoring of hygrothermal performance of a wood-frame house in the Lower Mainland of BC built to the passive house standard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6071
Author
Wang, Jieying
Mistretta, S.
Date
March 2014
Edition
43873
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Wang, Jieying
Mistretta, S.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2014
Edition
43873
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Moisture content
Series Number
W-3100
Language
English
Abstract
A single-family wood-frame house in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia built to the German Passivhaus (Passive House) standard was monitored to investigate its thermal performance and durability in this mild climate. Two double-stud walls, south- and north-facing, were instrumented during construction to measure moisture and thermal performance. A limited amount of thermal modelling was conducted to compare with the field measurements. Monitoring over the past 20 months showed that:
The double-stud walls, south- and north-facing, were both performing well in terms of durability. The moisture content (MC) measured at the bottom of the studs was in general below 15% after the construction was completed. The MC of the south-facing wall dropped from an initial 20%, measured during construction, to about 11% after construction was completed. During the same period of time, the MC of the north-facing wall fell from about 19% to 15%; the slightly higher MC in this wall compared to that in the south-facing wall was a result of lower amounts of solar gain in this orientation.
The relative humidity (RH) measured on the interior side of the medium-density fibreboard (MDF) exterior sheathing in the south-facing wall ranged from 70% to 80%, and occasionally up to 90% during the winter. Being typical of exterior sheathing conditions without exterior insulation in this mild climate, the corresponding RH ranged from 80% up to 100% in the north-facing wall in the winter, indicating potential vapour condensation at this critical location.
Based on vapour pressure analysis, no steep vapour pressure gradients between any specific layers were found in these two walls, indicating the overall vapour permeable nature and good drying performance of the wall design. This could be partially attributed to the use of plywood as structural sheathing located between the double-stud walls as the air barrier and vapour retarding layer, and using MDF as the exterior sheathing.
In the south-facing wall, the vapour pressure analysis showed a vapour drive in the summer from the exterior layers towards the interior layer, primarily due to high temperature outside. The exterior sheathing should have good drying potential if wetting occurred. On the other hand, the partial vapour pressures were largely consistent across the north-facing wall in the winter, not showing a strong vapour drive from interior to exterior in this mild climate. The exterior sheathing would have poor drying performance if wetting occurred in this location.
The simulated temperature distributions based on THERM 6.3 simulations were generally in good agreement with the measured temperatures across the walls, indicating that the thermal simulation was reasonably accurate. The effective R-value of the double-stud walls of this passive house was calculated to be approximately R-50 (hržft2žF/Btu) or RSI-8.8 (m2K)/W) (i.e. with a thermal transmission coefficient of 0.114 W/m2žK). The use of heat flux sensors was not successful in this work, probably due to improper sensor calibration or in-situ installation. Its use needs further exploration to measure heat flow in building envelopes in order to validate calculated effective thermal insulation.
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24 records – page 1 of 3.