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Flotation of western hemlock

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub52863
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
May 2018
Material Type
Presentation
Field
Fibre Supply
PDF
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Abstract There was no change to the moisture content of any of the western hemlock log sample sets
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
May 2018
Material Type
Presentation
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Trees
Moisture content
Water
Transport
Series Number
Report
Language
English
Abstract
There was no change to the moisture content of any of the western hemlock log sample sets during the study period between 1 Dec 2014 and 5 mar 2015. It seems that this lack of change is related to stability in environmental humidity experienced by the logs. Whether or not time since cutting influences the ability of Hw logs to change moisture content could not be conclusively determined by the study.
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Hemlock drying in coastal BC: 2015-2016

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49817
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
, there are two distinct trajectories for hemlock wood moisture content, depending on if the tree was felled
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wood
Drying
British Columbia
Moisture content
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2018 n.14
Language
English
Abstract
Based on the data from this study and a literature review, there are two distinct trajectories for hemlock wood moisture content, depending on if the tree was felled before or after May. Hemlock trees felled before May gain the full benefit of spring drying according to the ambient conditions of their local micro-climate. Trees felled after May suffer from a physiological spike in moisture content that the tree generates to promote its growth and survive the summer soil drought.
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Hemlock drying update: 2016/17

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49818
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
March 2018
Material Type
InfoNote
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
March 2018
Material Type
InfoNote
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wood
Drying
British Columbia
Moisture content
Series Number
InfoNote ; 2018 n. 7
Language
English
Abstract
The problem of second-growth western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) sinking when watered continues to plague the coastal logging industry of British Columbia. A study conducted by FPInnovations in 2015-16 concluded that felled hemlock logs took two distinct trajectories in their drying patterns through time, depending on whether they were felled before or after May.
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Instrumentation for monitoring performance in a six-storey building in Vancouver built for high energy performance

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7512
Author
Wang, Jieying
Thomas, Tony
Date
March 2018
Edition
49833
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Wang, Jieying
Thomas, Tony
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2018
Edition
49833
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Monitoring
Performance
Buildings
Energy
Moisture content
Air
Series Number
Transformative Technology ; TT 2018
Language
English
Abstract
This report documents the instrumentation installed for monitoring moisture, indoor air quality and differential movement performance in a six-storey building located in the City of Vancouver. The building has five storeys of wood-frame construction above a concrete podium, providing 85 rental units for residential and commercial use. It was designed and built to meet the Passive House standard and, once certified, will be the largest building in Canada that meets this rigorous energy standard. Although the design and construction focused on integrating a number of innovative measures to improve energy efficiency, much effort was also made to reduce construction costs. One example of the design measures is the use of a highly insulating exterior wall assembly that integrates rigid insulation between two rows of wall studs as interior air and vapour barriers. This monitoring study aims to generate data on long-term performance as part of FPInnovations’ effort to assist the building sector in developing durable and energy efficient wood-based buildings, which is expected to translate into reduced energy consumption and carbon emissions from the built environment. The monitoring focuses on measuring moisture performance of the building envelope (i.e., exterior walls, roof, and sill plates); indoor environmental quality including temperature, humidity, and CO2; and vertical differential movement between exterior walls and interior walls below roof/roof decks. In total, 79 instruments were installed during the construction. The next steps of this study will focus on collecting and analysing data from the sensors installed, and assessing performance related to the building envelope and vertical differential movement. FPInnovations will also collaborate with CanmetENERGY of Natural Resources Canada to monitor heat recovery ventilators and to assess whole-building energy efficiency and occupant comfort. This is expected to start after the mechanical systems are fully commissioned during occupancy. Results of these upcoming phases of work will be published in future reports.
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Mill trial of log storage age effects on veneer production and using LogdryTM to predict douglas fir log residual moisture contents

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub52647
Author
Semple, Katherine
Dai, Chunping
Date
August 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
the start of the growing season when the moisture content in the sapwood of Douglas fir tends to be lower
Author
Semple, Katherine
Dai, Chunping
Date
August 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Logs
Storing
Aging
Veneer
Moisture content
Series Number
Industry Partnership
Language
English
Abstract
This study was conducted with the aim of assessing the effects of log storage time and conditions at a BC mill yard on veneer production under mill production conditions. The second objective was to validate the FPInnovations LogdryTM drying model for developed for wood piles in Eastern Canadian mills. The software was used to generate drying rate predictions under the BC mill’s prevailing weather conditions and storage times for comparison with some measured residual moisture contents of Douglas fir logs kept in storage at the mill for six and nine months, sampled and peeled in a laboratory trial in 2016. The 2016 lab trials suggested little effect of lengthy (winter) storage up to 9 months but mill experience suggests this is excessively long and logs deteriorate in terms of veneer production and quality considerably earlier. Unfortunately due to experimental circumstances the mill peeling trials for the 9 month stored logs were unable to provide an accurate assessment of the true effect on production. Mills trials indicated % heavy sap had remained fairly stable largely within the mill target of 14% to 17% over the storage periods. During the mill trials there were unavoidable heavy confounding effects of different average diameter for log groups and peeler knife condition affecting the expected veneer production variables. The trials also demonstrated how pile size and height play a major role in protecting logs from drying; with very dry logs having a deleterious effect on veneer production. Logs held in small piles for 12 months or more, even with artificial ‘drying retardants’ such as end sealant and tarping were too dry for reliable peeling, causing very rapid knife wear, spinouts, veneer break-up and line blockages and significant lost recovery. The % heavy sap offtakes from these trials were just 2% to 4%. LogDryTM provides a fairly good estimate of likely drying rate trends of mid-sized (35 cm/14” to 41 cm/16” range) Douglas fir under the BC mills historic weather conditions over 6 and 9 months. LogDryTM (Birch setting) was closest to measured log MC in large diameter (46 cm/18”) logs but the Aspen setting was closer to measured MC in small logs (<30 cm/12”). In the limited sample of logs available from the mill in 2016 the 12” logs were much drier after 9 months storage than the model predicted, even on the Aspen setting. Further sampling of piled logs in the small diameter range is needed to verify this observation. LogDryTM was used to estimate drying rates of logs stored before or after Summer. Modelling indicated a shorter viable storage window for logs delivered before Summer compared to just before Winter, especially in the 6-month range. Residual log MCs were very similar after 12 months regardless of start time. Further work is required to better calibrate LogdryTM for major Western Canadian species, particularly Douglas fir, Spruce and Lodgepole pine, and reduce the calculation time for simulations. Further adjustment may be needed for simulating real drying rates in very small logs. The model assumption of similar residual MC after 12 months regardless of start time also needs to be verified.
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Observations of the Peterson Pacific DDC 5000 log delimber-debarker-chipper

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39930
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
September 1994
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
September 1994
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Costs
Chips
Productivity
Bark
Processing
Machines
Moisture content
Alberta
Series Number
FO Technical Note Wood Harvesting ; TN 214
Language
English
Abstract
In-woods chipping
In-woods debarking
Satellite operations
Software
COSTS
Fuji/King debarker
Bruks 1512 drum chipper
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Temperature and moisture insensitive prediction of biomass calorific value from NIR spectra using external parameter orthogonalization

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub52660
Author
Hans, Guillaume
Allison, Bruce J.
Date
September 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Bioproducts
PDF
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for such an application. However, the NIR spectra are also influenced by biomass temperature (T°) and moisture content
Author
Hans, Guillaume
Allison, Bruce J.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
September 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Bioproducts
Research Area
Biomass Conversion
Subject
Biomass
Optimization
Spectroscopy
Temperature
Moisture content
Series Number
Transformative Technology ; TT 2018
Language
English
Abstract
In the pulp and paper and biofuel industries, real-time online characterization of biomass gross calorific value (GCV) is of critical importance to determine its quality and price and for process optimization. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a relatively low-cost technology that could potentially be used for such an application. However, the NIR spectra are also influenced by biomass temperature (T°) and moisture content (MC). In this paper, external parameter orthogonalization (EPO) is employed to remove simultaneously the influence of T° and MC on the spectra before predicting GCV. EPO is of particular interest when one desires to transfer information from one modeling experiment to another, such as when developing a calibration model for a new property from the same material, or when it would be more efficient to divide the experimental effort. EPO was found to be an effective method for desensitizing a PLS calibration model to the influence of T° and MC, enabling robust and accurate prediction biomass GCV. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models developed with EPO always provided equal or better performance than models developed without EPO. The paper shows that experimental efforts and costs can be reduced by approximately one half while maintaining prediction accuracy and model robustness.
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Wicking to reduce moisture content in Western Hemlock: Vancouver Island study

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49848
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
FPInnovations ─ Report Title 1 Wicking to Reduce Moisture Content in Western Hemlock
Author
Friesen, Charles
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wood
Drying
British Columbia
Moisture content
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2018 n.26
Language
English
Abstract
The idea that a wicking treatment – leaving tops, branches, and needles attached to the stem after felling – would reduce stem moisture content and lead to reduced loss of western hemlock logs from sinking during watering was tested. This study did not show that wicking produces a different result from normal bucking in average stem moisture content if both groups are treated equally. Further, after curing for two months logs did not increase in moisture content during watering.
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8 records – page 1 of 1.