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Decision aids for durable wood construction : review and redirection

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41201
Author
O'Connor, J.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
of the assembly such as building paper and flashing, to enforce the building code requirement that the moisture
Author
O'Connor, J.
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Building construction
Planning
Design
Moisture content
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 19
Project No. 1052
W-1611
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The project Decision Aids for Durable Wood Construction underwent a major review with the hiring of a new project leader (O'Connor) in September 1998. In consultation with the project liaisons, the work on this project since its start-up in 1993 was examined, the primary task of developing a computer-based tool for the building industry was reconsidered, the context of worldwide research into building envelope moisture failures was reviewed, and a revised project plan was proposed. Decision Aids was a self-contained project for its first three years, with efforts concentrated on knowledge acquisition, expert system experimentation and other foundation work for development of a computer tool. With a rise of interest in building envelope moisture failures across North America and elsewhere, Decision Aids activity shifted into a mode that was reactive to projects and events external to Forintek. This was necessary due to the level of effort external agencies, media and research labs were devoting to the topic. In particular, where the actions of outsiders began to have an influence on wood in construction, we found it critical to participate in order to ensure the fair and correct treatment of wood. The new project leader was asked to review the project and either get the project back on its original track or suggest a redirection. The project goal, to assist end users in best application of wood, was determined to be sound. In addition, the project leader recommended that resources continue to be allocated to participation in outside research efforts and other related activities. However, it was recommended that the project objective to develop computer-based decision tools be reassessed. Instead, the project leader recommended a course of action focused on tasks both shorter in term and smaller in scope, which will enable Forintek to deliver results better tailored to the immediate needs of industry in a time of building envelope moisture failure "crisis." The new project plan is split into two areas: 1) address building envelope moisture failures that are due to existing information not arriving in the right hands (i.e., a technology transfer problem); and 2) address building envelope moisture failures that are due to a lack of information (i.e., a research problem). The technology transfer area will create a formal plan for communication to the building industry, will enable Forintek to experiment with developing pathways to that new target audience, and will provide the means for the wood industry to provide helpful durability information to the public through a relatively neutral third party (Forintek). The research area will explore opportunities for limited scope experiments or collaborative field studies of wood system durability performance, with the intent of verifying or modifying codes, standards and best practice guides.
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Moisture evaluation and veneer peeling of douglas fir and spruce logs from different mills and log yard age inventories

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49466
Author
Semple, Katherine
Dai, Chunping
Date
August 2017
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Semple, Katherine
Dai, Chunping
Date
August 2017
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
69 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Moisture content
Veneer
Fir
Spruce
Storing
Language
English
Abstract
A total of 48 peeler blocks and 256 mini-billets were sampled from mills to investigate the effects of yard storage time, and artificial yard drying and sprinkling on residual moisture contents (MCs) and veneer quality. MC in fresh and stored log inventories varied greatly across mills according to geographic location of their wood supply zones, bark damage and loss, and storage time and conditions. The main findings were as follows: 1. DF logs supplied by three BC mills from the Cariboo, Thompson Okanagan, or Kootenay regions were highly variable in wood MC. 2. Winter-cut DF logs with high sapwood MC stored had good bark retention and high moisture retention over 6 and 9 winter-spring months. No effects on veneer peeling roughness from longer-term winter storage up to 9 months. 3. Summer-cut logs had little or no residual bark, or the bark slipped off very easily during debarking. Exposed, bark-free summer-cut logs can dry and crack on edges and ends very quickly, within a few weeks. 4. A marked decline in veneer quality with piling time in Summer for spruce and DF, suggesting an optimum window of processing of such exposed logs of about two weeks. Veneer quality and recovery suffered markedly once the logs had fully air dried mainly because of edge splits creating natural fragmentation of the ribbon. 5. Mills receiving dry-zone logs with much lower MC have a very limited storage window, especially over winter. As little as 2-3 weeks if bark is damaged or missing. 6. Veneer quality could not be definitively tied to log residual MC. Under the controlled laboratory conditions used here it was observed that peeling quality could still be good at low sapwood MC (35-40%) and or very high (MC>100%). Whether this is still the case in mill production is unknown. 7. Logs must never be allowed to fall below FSP and develop edge-checks or deep end checks. 8. Wax emulsion end sealants were effective at hampering drying and end checking on high MC logs, but not effective on low MC logs. 9. Sprinkling retained log freshness and peel quality in high MC DF for several months and prevented log drying and end splitting as well as inner log staining. Ends absorbed considerable extra moisture. Some variability in peel quality was noted. 10. The prototype EM1000 Ground Penetrating Radar could only be reliably used in log edge mode in DF. The unit would also require re-calibration for the very high sapwood MC in spruce and wet-zone DF logs.
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