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Accelerated durability testing of wood-base fiber and particle panel materials

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1494
Author
Unligil, H.H.
Date
March 1982
Edition
37999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
considerable interest has developed in expanding the market by producing panels suitable for new areas
Author
Unligil, H.H.
Date
March 1982
Edition
37999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
7 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Panels
Materials
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 12/81-82
3-65-57-016
E-23
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Composite materials - Durability
Wood-based panels
Wood-based panels - Durability
Wood Based Composites
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Collaborative development of novel hollow core composite panels for value-added secondary applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2598
Author
Deng, James
Date
March 2009
Edition
39192
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
and University of Toronto to develop and test a range of hollow core composite sandwich panels based
Author
Deng, James
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2009
Edition
39192
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
47 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Panels
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FCC 07 ; 6002
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
A research project was carried out in collaboration with researchers from both University of British Columbia and University of Toronto to develop and test a range of hollow core composite sandwich panels based on lignocellulosic materials that can extend the current applications of wood composite products such as high density particleboard and fibreboard (hardboard and MDF). With proper engineering design and unique light weight structural features, wood fibre resources will be more effectively used and the performance of each component can be maximized in these types of novel composite panels. The outcome of this project is the development of Canadian-made light weight panels containing various low density cores, including honeycomb, low density wood wool composites and cup-shaped thin fibreboard, and high density surface panels, including plywood, hardboard and high density fibreboard (HDF) for the applications in ready to assemble (RTA) modular furniture, home and commercial cabinetry and door panels. The work completed at Forintek included:
Development of low density wood wool panels (LCD) as the core material for the sandwich panels.
Development of cup-shaped high density fibreboard (CHDF) as the core material
Evaluation of edgewise and flat compression strength and creep behaviour of honeycomb sandwich panels fabricated by UBC.
Development of book shelf panels using four different core materials.
Performance evaluation of the book shelves developed. The results of the experimental work suggest that:
Low density composite core materials can be made by the technology developed at Forintek laboratory using low density poplar wood wool and high viscosity phenol and formaldehyde resin with steam injection hot pressing technology. However, the strength of the panels was relatively low comparing to conventional low density particleboard, OSB or fibreboard.
The experimental work carried out on the cup-shaped high density fibreboard (CHDF) show the potential for developing various light weight core materials using current MDF process technology. The internal bond strength (IB) and water absorption (WA) of the cup-shaped panels were strongly correlated with panel density. IB increased and WA reduced when increasing the panel density. The flexibility of the technology could optimize the properties and performance of CHDF through manipulating the fibre refining process, profile design, resin system and hot pressing strategy. It shows that CHDF is a good alternative material to Kraft paper honeycombs for the manufacture of sandwich panels for higher strength and performance applications.
Test results from sandwich panels made of cup-shaped fibreboard core and HDF surface show that the nominal density of the cup-shaped core was one of the most important process parameters to adjust for the improvement of the sandwich panel properties. The flat compressive modulus, flat tensile strength and short-beam strength increased when increasing the nominal density of the core panels. Furthermore, the overall density of the sandwich panels were only fractionally increased by increasing the nominal density of the core panels due to the cup-shaped shape of the core panels. It suggests that higher nominal core density should be used when higher mechanical strength of the panels is required.
To a lesser extent, fibre type in the core panels also affects the sandwich panel properties. Longer wood fibres are recommended for use in the manufacture of the core panels.
The results of the experiment also show that increasing the thickness of the surface HDF panels increased the bending strength of the sandwich panels substantially. However, the overall density also increased.
Comparing shear properties of the four different sandwich panels developed by Forintek, we can identify that the ultimate shear strengths were different for different core materials. The sandwich panel made from polycarbonate core had the highest shear strength (0.744 MPa) followed by the panel made with CHDF (0.497 MPa). The sandwich panel made from low density wood wool core had much lower shear strength (0.012 MPa) which is lower than the paper honeycomb sandwich panels previously made by UBC with the same surface and core thickness (0.024 MPa).
The sandwich panels made with high density cup-shaped fibreboard had significantly higher core shear modulus (92.0 MPa) than any other sandwich panel studied in this project.
Hollow core
Composite panels
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Comparative swelling tests on waferboard and oriented strandboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38214
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Pfaff, Frank
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Pfaff, Frank
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
78 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Waferboards
Swelling
Strands
Shrinkage
Panels
Oriented strandboard
Orientation
Series Number
CFS project no.3
E-744
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Waferboard - Swelling
Oriented Strand Board - Swelling
Wood Based Panels - Swelling
Swelling and shrinkage
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Computer simulation model of hot-pressing process of LVL and plywood products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5575
Author
Wang, Brad J.
Yu, C.
Date
April 2003
Edition
37655
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
into the veneer ply due to the existence of open lathe checks and roughness. Therefore, LVL/plywood panels can
Author
Wang, Brad J.
Yu, C.
Date
April 2003
Edition
37655
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer
Simulation
Plywood
Panels
Materials
Laminate product
Hot press
Gluing
Series Number
2019
W-1965
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) and plywood are the two major veneer-based wood composite products. During LVL/plywood manufacturing, the hot pressing process is crucial not only to the quality and productivity, but also to the performance of panel products. Up to now, the numerical simulation of the hot-pressing process of LVL/plywood products is not available. To help understand the hot-pressing process of veneer-based wood composites, the main objective of this study was to develop a computer simulation model to predict heat and mass transfer and panel densification of veneer-based composites during hot-pressing. On the basis of defining wood-glue mix layers through the panel thickness, a prototype finite-element based LVL/plywood hot-pressing model, VPress®, was developed to simulate, for the first time, the changes of temperature, moisture and vertical density profile (VDP) of each veneer ply and glueline throughout the pressing cycle. This model is capable of showing several important characteristics of the hot-pressing process of veneer-based composites such as effect of glue spread level, veneer moisture, density, platen pressure and temperature as well as pressing cycles on heat and mass transfer and panel compression. Experiments were conducted using several different variables to validate the model. The predicted temperature profiles of the veneer plies and gluelines (especially at the innermost glueline) by the model agree well with the experimental measurements. Hence, the model can be used to evaluate the sensitivity of the main variables that affect hot-pressing time (productivity), panel compression (material recovery) and vertical density profile (panel stiffness). Once customized in industry, the new model will allow operators to optimize the production balance between productivity, panel densification and panel quality or stiffness. This hot-pressing model is the first step in facilitating the optimization of the pressing process and enhanced product quality.
Veneers
Panels - Production - Computer simulation
Density - Computer simulation
Composite materials - Density
Plywood - Density
Lumber, Laminated veneer
Gluing - Processes - Hot press
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Development of a high performance OSB panel

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5662
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Kirincic, S.
Date
May 1994
Edition
38675
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Kirincic, S.
Contributor
Alberta Research Council
Date
May 1994
Edition
38675
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Thickness
Testing
Strandboards
Strands
Performance
Panels
OSB
Oriented strandboard
Orientation
Series Number
3843M410
E-1922
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
The bending properties of aspen waferboard can be improved by increasing the resin content and/or board density. These options, however have limited effect and are very costly. On the other hand, panels produced with longer, oriented stands have demonstrated significant improvements in bending strength and stiffness. The panel industry has recently used wafers or strands up to approximately 102mm (4in), however, the utilization of much longer material is practical. In addition to more efficient use of the wood resource, structural panels with improved properties can penetrate more demanding applications, particularly as future engineering materials, and overcome some problems experienced with traditional wood composites such as creep. The overall objective of the study was to demonstrate that by using long strands, coupled with appropriate strand alignment, strand thickness, and face-to-core layer ratio, a structural panel can be produced with superior strength and stiffness in the aligned direction while maintaining adequate properties in the cross direction. The specific objective for this year's work was to establish the improved performance using panels produced in structural sizes and under conditions that parallel those of the industry more closely. Manufacturers of oriented strandboard and waferboard can use the information to produce high performance OSB panel products with minimal effects on production parameters and costs.
Oriented strandboard - Performance testing
OSB Panels
Strand Alignment
Strand Thickness
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Development of an improved method for analysis of panels with low formaldehyde emission

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39223
Author
Dechamplain, F.
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Development of an Improved Method for Analysis of Panels with Low Formaldehyde Emission
Author
Dechamplain, F.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pollution
Panels
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 20
5763
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In April 2008, the State of California adopted an airborne toxic control measure (ATCM) to reduce formaldehyde emissions from composite wood products, proposed by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), part of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Phase 1 started in January 2009, and at the end of the implementation, in July 2012, formaldehyde emission limits will range between 0.05 and 0.13 ppm, depending on the type of products, based on the ASTM E 1333 Large Chamber Method. These new limits are in the order of the limits of detection of the current analytical methods presently used, and rendered the chromotropic acid reaction, on which the ASTM E 1333 is based, with a limit of detection of 0.01 ppm less precise. An alternative method to determine formaldehyde concentration in air has been developed to be used as part of the ASTM E1333 Large Chamber Method. 60 L of air are sampled through an impinger containing an acetylacetone-ammonia solution. The solution is then heated, and analyzed by fluorimetry using a Turner Quantech filter fluorometer equipped with a NB430 excitation filter and a SC500 emission filter. The test method is inexpensive, easy to use, compatible with the Large Chamber, Perforator and Desiccator Methods, and is very sensitive. The minimum detection limit (MDL) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) of this analytical method are 0.0004 and 0.0013 ppm, respectively.
Air pollution
Formaldehyde
Panels
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Development of an improved method for analysis of panels with low formaldehyde emission

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39094
Author
Barry, A.
Dechamplain, F.
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
for Analysis of Panels with Low Formaldehyde Emission Project Leaders: Alpha Barry/Frédéric Dechamplain
Author
Barry, A.
Dechamplain, F.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood composites
Wood
Panels
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 20
5763
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Formaldehyde emission
Wood composite panels
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Development of an improved method for analysis of panels with low formaldehyde emission (Part B)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39297
Author
Dechamplain, F.
Date
March 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Development of an Improved Method for Analysis of Panels with Low Formaldehyde Emission
Author
Dechamplain, F.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pollution
Panels
Air pollution
Air
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 20
201000329
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
In April 2008, the State of California adopted an airborne toxic control measure (ATCM) to reduce formaldehyde emissions from composite wood products, proposed by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), part of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Phase 1 started in January 2009, and at the end of the implementation, in July 2012, formaldehyde emission limits will range between 0.05 and 0.13 ppm, depending on the type of products, based on the ASTM E 1333 Large Chamber Method. These new limits are in the order of the limits of detection of the current analytical methods presently used, and rendered the chromotropic acid reaction, on which the ASTM E 1333 is based, with a limit of detection of 0.01 ppm less precise. The use of Near Infrared technology was investigated in 2009/2010. This analytical technique was not initially considered to be sensitive enough to measure formaldehyde emissions at very low levels. Recent developments in the broadband sources of near infrared radiation available and the type of detectors used have contributed in recent years to improve spectral stability and sensitivity. Some instruments have recently been tested in Europe and equipment suppliers claim that these systems can be used for online monitoring of formaldehyde emissions. This analytical technique is not recognized at this time by Canadian and US regulatory authorities and more testing was required to demonstrate the system’s reliability. Commercial products with very low free formaldehyde have been tested in 2009 with NIR sensors and results have been correlated with the ASTM E 1333 Large Chamber test results. At least one Canadian panel manufacturer has already expressed interest in running a mill trial. Results will be presented to regulatory authorities.
Air pollution
Formaldehyde
Panels
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Development of fire retardant composite panels

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39220
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Resistance
Panels
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18
5764
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Panels - Fire resistance
Documents
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Development of fire retardant composite panels. Part III. Small-scale fire testing methods for R&D use as alternatives to fire test standards specified in building codes : literature review

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39109
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Development of Fire Retardant Composite Panels Part III. Small Scale Fire Testing Methods
Author
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Zhang, Yaolin
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Panels
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18
5764
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood belongs to the natural bio-composites of plant origin containing cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and other compounds. When exposed to fire or any other high intensity heat sources, wood, being a natural polymer, is subject to thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) and combustion depending on the environmental conditions. Combustion accompanied by heat release and chemiluminescence occurs when wood is in direct contact with air and with a physical, chemical or microbiological stimulus associated with heat release. There are increasing concerns about the fire performance of engineered wood products (EWP) and wood composite products such as oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium density fiberboard (MDF) and high density fiberboard (HDF) panels. Wood composite panels, like structural wood products, should have certain fire retardant properties with respect to both safety and the environment. It is believed that this issue will get more attention in the near future as environmental regulations are developed and the requirements of end-users change. A Canadian Forest Service (CFS) project in the Composites Program, entitled “Development of Fire Retardant Composite Panels (Project No. 5764),” was initiated in 2007. The aim of the project is to develop fire retardant OSB panel and low-density fiberboard (FB) through the modification of wood furnish and/or adhesives using fire retardants and nano materials, and to improve the fire performance of panel surface coatings by using fire retardant coatings and paints. As part of the project deliverables, a series of literature reviews on different aspects of fire performance for wood and composite wood products has been conducted. So far, two literature review reports have been issued: Part I. Fire-Performance Requirements for Composite Wood Products and Standard Fire Tests for Demonstrating Compliance with those Requirements - Literature Review and Part II. Proprietary Fire Retardant Treated Wood and Composite Wood Products - Literature Review. In this current report (Part III), the literature review was focused on describing a number of small-scale fire tests that can be used for research and development purposes as alternatives to the standard fire tests referenced in building codes in Canada and the United States. The literature review was conducted by Mr. Leslie R. Richardson, retired senior research scientist and Group Leader of Building Systems – Fire Program of FPInnovations – Forintek Division. It is believed that this literature review will be an invaluable guide for acquiring information on fire performance requirements and standard fire test methods for wood and composite wood products. The full literature review is available in Appendix.
Fire retardants
Composite products
Panels
Documents
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55 records – page 1 of 6.