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Accelerated durability testing of wood-base fiber and particle panel materials

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1494
Author
Unligil, H.H.
Date
March 1982
Edition
37999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
considerable interest has developed in expanding the market by producing panels suitable for new areas
Author
Unligil, H.H.
Date
March 1982
Edition
37999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
7 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Panels
Materials
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 12/81-82
3-65-57-016
E-23
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Composite materials - Durability
Wood-based panels
Wood-based panels - Durability
Wood Based Composites
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Design models for CLT shearwalls and assemblies based on connection properties

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6035
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Gavric, I.
Date
April 2014
Edition
43014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Gavric, I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2014
Edition
43014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
115 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Design
Laminate product
Panels
Timber
Series Number
Transformative Technologies
W-3093
Language
English
Abstract
The work presented in this report is a continuation of the FPInnovations' research project on determining the performance of the CLT as a structural system under lateral loads. As currently there are no standardized methods for determining the resistance of CLT shearwalls under lateral loads, the design approaches are left at discretion of the designers. The most common approach that is currently used in Europe and North America assumes that the resistance of CLT walls is a simple summary of the shear resistance of all connectors at the bottom of the wall. In this report some new analytical models for predicting of the design (factored) resistance of CLT walls under lateral loads were developed based on connection properties. These new models were than evaluated for their consistency along with the models that are currently used in North America and in Europe. In total five different design models (approaches) were used in the study, the two existing models and three newly developed ones. All models were used to predict the factored lateral load resistances of various CLT wall configurations tested in 2010 at FPInnovations. The analyzed walls had different aspect ratios and segmentation, different vertical load levels, different connection layouts and different fasteners in the connections (ring nails, spiral nails and screws). The design values obtained using the various analytical models were compared with the maximum forces and yielding forces obtained from the experimental tests. Ratios between the ultimate loads obtained from experimental tests and design values obtained by the five analytical design models were used as a measure for the consistency of the models. Newly developed models that account for sliding-uplift interaction in the brackets (models D3-D5) showed higher level of consistency compared to existing ones. The analytical model D4 that accounts for sliding-uplift interaction according to a circular domain, is probably the best candidate for future development of design procedures for determining resistance of CLT walls under lateral loads. In case of coupled CLT walls, contribution of vertical load to the wall lateral resistance was found to be two times lower than in case of single wall element with the same geometry and vertical load. Special attention in the coupled walls design should be given to step joints between the adjacent wall panels. Over-design of the step joint can result in completely different wall behavior in terms of mechanical properties (strength, ductility, deformation capacity, etc.) that those predicted. It should be noted that conclusions made in this report are made based on the comparison to the tested configurations only. Additional experimental data or results from numerical parametric analyses are needed to cover additional variations in wall parameters such as wall geometry and aspect ratio, layout of connectors (hold-downs, brackets), type and number of fasteners used in the connectors, and the amount of vertical load. The findings in this report, however, give a solid base for the development of seismic design procedure for CLT structures. Such procedure should also include capacity based design principles, which take into account statistical distributions of connections resistances.
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Time-dependent behavior of cross-laminated timber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43013
Author
Pirvu, Ciprian
Date
March 2014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Pirvu, Ciprian
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
70 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Building construction
Design
Laminate product
Panels
Timber
Series Number
Transformative Technologies No. 1.1.12
W-3092
Language
English
Abstract
Cross laminated timber (CLT) panels were manufactured and tested to assess their time dependent behaviour. This study is intended to help guide the development of an appropriate test method and acceptance criteria to account for duration of load and creep effects in the design of structures using CLT. Nine CLT panels of different qualities and using different wood species combinations were manufactured at a pre-commercial pilot plant out of local wood species. The CLT panels manufactured in this study were pressed at about 54% lower pressure than the minimum vertical pressure specified by the adhesive manufacturer due to a limitation of the press, so the CLT panels are viewed as a simulated defective sample, which may occur in a production environment due to material- or process-related issues. Full-size CLT panels were initially tested non-destructively to assess their bending stiffness. Then, billets were ripped from the full-size CLT panels, and tested to failure in 1-minute and 10-hour ramp tests, or assessed in creep tests under sustained load. The constant loads imposed on the CLT billets tested in creep were calculated as to allow for a maximum deflection of L/180. Following two cycles of loading and relaxation, the CLT billets tested in creep were further tested to failure at the end. The principles of ASTM D6815-09 and those of an in-house FPInnovations protocol were applied to assess the time dependent behavior of the CLT billets. The main test findings are summarized below:
In terms of residual stiffness, the percentage change in the initial bending stiffness for the CLT billets subjected to the 10-hour ramp test varied between 0-5%, showing a 3% drop in stiffness on average, while that for the CLT billets tested in creep ranged between 0-3%, showing a 1% stiffness drop on average. These are regarded as relatively small changes in bending stiffness.
In general, decreasing creep rates were observed on most of the CLT billets especially in the first cycle up to 90 days. The creep rates went up after 120 days of loading due to an increase in temperature and relative humidity conditions, which greatly affect the rate of deflection and recovery of wood products.
Fractional deflections were calculated for all the CLT billets after 30-day intervals and found to be less than or equal to 1.43.
Creep recovery was above 36% after 30-day, 60-day, and 90-day recovery periods in the first cycle. However, in the second cycle, creep recovery for some CLT billets dropped below 20% for certain time periods. ASTM D6815-09 provides specifications for evaluation of duration of load and creep effects of wood and wood-based products. The standard was designed to accommodate wood products that can be easily sampled, handled, and tested under load for minimum 90 days and up to 120 days. The standard requires a minimum sample size of 28 specimens. Because of its large dimensions, CLT products are not feasible for experiments requiring such large sample sizes. However, the findings of this study revealed potential for some of the acceptance criteria in ASTM D6815-09 to be applied to CLT products. The CLT billets in this study were assessed in accordance to the creep rate, fractional deflection, and creep recovery criteria in ASTM D6815-09 standard. All CLT billets tested in this study showed (1) decreasing creep rates after 90/120 days of loading, (2) fractional deflections less than 2.0 after 90-day loading, and (3) higher creep recovery than 20% after 30 days of unloading, as required by ASTM D6815-09. A single replicate billet was used per CLT configuration instead of the minimum sample size required by the standard which may have an effect on the findings.
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