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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Characterising the dimensional stability, checking, and permeability of wood containing beetle-transmitted bluestain

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1219
Author
McFarling, S.M.
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Date
August 2003
Edition
37666
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Characterising the Dimensional Stability, Checking, and Permeability of Wood Containing Beetle-Transmitted
Author
McFarling, S.M.
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment.
Date
August 2003
Edition
37666
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Trees
Stain fungal
Stain
Preservatives penetration
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Permeability
Penetration
Insects
Series Number
R2003-0133
W-1985
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The major defining characteristic of lumber cut from trees that have been infected with the mountain pine beetle is the extent of fungal bluestain in the sapwood. Forintek Canada Corp. scientists have previously observed that bluestained wood appears to have different dimensional stability characteristics than non-stained wood when subjected to repeated wetting and drying. Bluestained wood has also been reported to show increased permeability, which may make treatment with liquids such as wood preservatives easier. However, no data is available on how bluestained wood resulting from the beetle attack might affect. We therefore identified the need to generate data on the dimensional stability, checking, and permeability characteristics of bluestained wood compared with non-stained wood. To examine dimensional stability, specimens of bluestained and non-stained 2 x 4 in. lumber were subjected to wetting/drying cycles. After 5 and 10 cycles, the amount of bow, crook, cupping, twist, and checking was measured. The permeability of the wood was also determined by weighing end-matched specimens before and after a 1-, 4-, and 24-hour dip or after a pressure treatment cycle with chromated copper arsenate preservative, and then calculating the uptake and preservative retention. The results clearly show that when repeatedly wetted and dried, such as occurs in exterior end uses, bluestained beetle-killed wood is more dimensionally stable (less cupping and twist) and checks less than non-stained sapwood, but is more permeable to water. The stresses appear to be relieved by many micro-checks rather than fewer large checks. Overall, the improved dimensional stability should result in the lumber made from stained wood remaining straighter. Increased permeability of the bluestained wood was confirmed by data showing enhanced chromated copper arsenate (CCA) uptake and penetration. One implication of the stained sapwood treating more readily than non-stained wood is that in batches of preservative-treated wood, the stained wood is liable to be overtreated or the non-stained wood undertreated. As anticipated, bluestain in the sapwood had no effect on the penetration of preservative into the heartwood, the most refractory part of the wood. Treatment with CCA also masked the bluestain by coloring it green. The increased permeability probably also has implications for ease of air or kiln drying and possibly reduced degrade in the kiln.
Insects - Attack on trees
Stains - Fungal
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Defects
Preservatives - Permeability
Preservatives - Penetration
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Preservation
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
Defects
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Controlling moisture permeability of OSB

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39383
Author
Ganev, S.
Date
January 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Project No. 3644 Controlling Moisture Permeability of OSB
Author
Ganev, S.
Date
January 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
42 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Strands
Permeability
OSB
Oriented strandboard
Orientation
Series Number
3644
E-4727
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to characterize OSB panel permeability in comparison with plywood and low density fiberboard; to determine the effect of panel characteristics on the speed of moisture movement through the thickness of the OSB panels; to create a finite element model of the permeability of OSB; to suggest improvements of the OSB panel structure in function of permeability. The introduction of current report presents extracts of the theory of moisture transfer in wood materials and introduces the concept of water potential and the instantaneous profile method as adapted to OSB to be used for the determination of the diffusion coefficient (D). The experimental part is divided into three stages. In the first stage the permeance of the OSB panels, plywood and low density fiberboard is compared according to the dry cup method. The experiments showed that the low-density fiberboard panels’ permeance is more than twice as high as compared with the permeance of the OSB panel; the Western Red Cedar has an approximately equal permeance with the OSB panel, which is in turn higher as compared with the permeance of the Aspen plywood. The Aspen plywood produced with parallel plies shows approximately 30 % higher permeance as compared to the regular plywood. In the second stage, the effects of density, strand geometry and orientation level, panel density and moisture content on the permeance and on the diffusion coefficient are determined. The experiment is organized based on an experimental design. For the permeability (permeance and diffusion coefficient), the lower the strand thickness, the lower the permeability; the lower the level of strand orientation, the higher the permeability; the larger the strand width and length (surface area), the lower the permeability, the higher the permeability. During the third stage, the dynamics of moisture movement in the panel is modeled with a finite element model based on an unsteady-state moisture transfer equation and the results from simulations are compared to experimental results in order to validate the model. Ten cases of adsorption and two cases of desorption are considered. Seven of the cases are duplicated with experimental results to serve for validation of the model. The closeness of the experimental and simulation results allow concluding the validity of the finite element model, which can be used to optimize the OSB panel structure by selecting practical layer characteristics leading to desired moisture permeability.
Moisture
Permeability
Oriented Strand Board (OSB)
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Development of vapour permeability data for waferboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5908
Author
Onysko, D.M.
Jones, S.K.
Date
March 1988
Edition
41540
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Onysko, D.M.
Jones, S.K.
Date
March 1988
Edition
41540
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Waferboards
Vapor
Permeability
Series Number
E-1168
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Waferboard - Vapour permeability
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Drying for improved heartwood permeability : 12-month interim report. Phase I

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41157
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Hartley, I.D.
Avramidis, S.
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Date
June 1997
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
DRYING FOR IMPROVED HEARTWOOD PERMEABILITY 12-MONTH INTERIM REPORT PHASE I P.I. Morris, L D. Hartley
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Hartley, I.D.
Avramidis, S.
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Contributor
Science Council of British Columbia.
Date
June 1997
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
British Columbia
Seasoning
Permeability
Heart Wood
Series Number
FRBC Reference # HQ 96075
SCBC Reference # FR 96/97-193
W-1402
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Canadian wood products present a problem when it comes to improving their properties through chemical treatment. Most Canadian wood species have heartwood that, after kiln drying is relatively impermeable to pressure treatment with aqueous solutions. One means to rectify this problem may be the use of different drying regimes. This project was designed to evaluate the effect of seven different drying regimes on the permeability of the heartwoods of five BC wood species. This report covers Phase I, research on lodgepole pine and white spruce. Lumber from these species was pre-sorted for permeability and moisture content and matched groups of 60 boards were subjected to one of seven drying regimes. These were, air drying, dehumidification, conventional kiln drying, steam plus conventional, high temperature, radio frequency/vacuum and superheated steam /vacuum drying. Each group was then separated into two sub-groups of 30 boards. One sub-group was pressure treated with disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT) and the other was pressure treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA). Each board was weighed before and after treatment to determine solution uptake. The DOT-treated material was sampled for solution penetration and chemical analysis immediately after treatment. The CCA-treated material was sampled after preservative fixation. The data from Phase I have not yet been statistically analysed. This will be done early in year two.
Heartwood - Moisture content
Heartwood - Permeability
Heartwood - Seasoning
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Evaluation of veneer properties from the forest resource

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37214
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Walser, D.C.
Steiner, P.R.
Clarke, Michael Raymond
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
s members. SUMMARY An apparatus was designed and b u i l t to evaluate permeability i n i n c
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Walser, D.C.
Steiner, P.R.
Clarke, Michael Raymond
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer tenderizing
Veneer
Permeability
Series Number
CFS No. 29a;87-18-12L-203
W-539
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Veneers - Tenderizing
Veneers - Permeability
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Finishing BC wood species for interior applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37560
Author
Groves, C. Kevin
Williams, D.
Date
April 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Groves, C. Kevin
Williams, D.
Date
April 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
24 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
British Columbia
Permeability
Series Number
Special Publication ; SP-44
W-1733
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This publication reports on a study carried out by Forintek Canada Corp. which examined the finishing properties of BC wood species and a number of competitive wood species from around the world. Some of the foreign wood species are well known and considered to be benchmark species. The procedures followed were standard tests for finish adherence as published by the American Society for Testing and Materials. The finishing tests determined the adhesion of a number of commonly used coatings for interior and exterior applications. A range of furniture-type finishes were applied to subjectively determine the appearance attributes of each species. A number of BC wood species performed well with respect to known benchmark wood species. This information can be used to raise awareness of their potential.
Finishes - Permeability
Finishing
Finishes - Tests
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Laser incising of Canadian sawnwood to improve treatability

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41035
Author
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Date
March 1987
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Date
March 1987
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservation
Permeability
Laser
Series Number
02-17-43-014
W-474
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Preservation - Incising
Lasers
Permeability
Incising
Documents
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Probability-based model for the penetration of fluids into wood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41466
Author
Hosli, J.P.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
of a mathematical model based on a permeability concept is impractical for predicting fluid penetration during
Author
Hosli, J.P.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Preservatives penetration
Preservatives
Permeability
Penetration
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no9 b/85-86
Project no.42-10-019
E-296
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Wood - Permeability
Preservatives - Penetration
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Production of higher-value treatable SPF lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40949
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Lam, F.
Mackay, J.F.Graham
Date
March 1990
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Lam, F.
Mackay, J.F.Graham
Date
March 1990
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
40 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Seasoning
Preservation
Permeability
Series Number
FRDA Report 119
W-757
Location
Victoria, British Columbia
Language
English
ISBN
0-662-17935-8
ISSN
0835-0752
Abstract
Summary included
Seasoning - Incising
Permeability
Preservation - Influence of seasoning
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Treatability of Douglas-fir heartwood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41038
Author
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Date
April 1987
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
) has reported that the permeability of Douglas-fir heartwood lumber produced i n B r i t i s h
Author
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Date
April 1987
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Permeability
Heart Wood
Series Number
02-17-43-021
W-477
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Permeability
Heartwood - Permeability
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11 records – page 1 of 2.