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185 records – page 1 of 19.

Advanced technologies to improve penetration of wood treatments : biological incising with Dichomitus squalens in spruce and pine lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42460
Author
Dale, Angela
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Dale, Angela
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Preservation
Pinus
Picea
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FPI#117W
W-2823
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Canadian wood species such as spruce and pine are difficult to treat with wood preservatives or other wood enhancing formulations due to a thin sapwood band and refractory heartwood. One method of improving penetration is by biological incising. Biological incising with Dichomitus squalens was originally developed in Austria in the 1990s to increase the permeability of European spruce prior to treatment with wood preservatives. Recently the patents on this technology lapsed. It was considered unlikely that industrial use of a European white-rot fungus would be acceptable in Canada. FPInnovations therefore conducted a screening test of a range of Canadian isolates of various white-rot fungi to identify an isolate that would be suitable for biological incising of Canadian spruce and pine. Under pure culture conditions, one isolate of Dichomitus squalens isolated from white spruce was found to greatly increase the permeability of the wood, particularly in spruce. The objective of the current study was to determine if these results could be achieved on commercial sized wood under non-sterile conditions more similar to an industrial setting. Lumber samples, 3.8 cm by 8.9 cm by 400 cm in length were incubated in plastic totes with fungal inoculum. Two isolates of fungi were tested as well as two different decontamination methods (steam and Benomyl solution) and two time frames (4 and 6 weeks). Through treatment of spruce samples (19 mm penetration) with 1.7% ACQ was achieved after six weeks incubation with D. squalens 78A (a spruce isolate). In matched samples treated with MCA, a minimum of 10 mm penetration was achieved in 90% of the samples. Strength loss in some individual samples was higher than adjustment factors for conventional incising (over 25%) suggesting that incubation time may need to be shortened. Preservative penetration was more variable in pine but permeability was increased; 60% of the samples reached a minimum penetration of 5 mm. Incubation time and conditions may need to be adjusted to achieve more consistent results. The results of this study show that biological incising can greatly improve the permeability of spruce and pine and can be achieved on 38 by 89 dimension lumber under conditions that could be utilized in an industrial setting. Future work should focus on determining incubation conditions that allow penetration requirements in Canadian standards to be met with acceptable strength loss.
Picea - Preservation
Pinus - Preservation
Preservation - Incising
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Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
, the wood is moderately hard and heavy. Botanical Name: Pinus banksiana Common Names: Scrub Pine, Hudson
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Ammoniacal wood preservatives for use in non-pressure treatment of spruce and aspen poplar

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4638
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1982
Edition
41437
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1982
Edition
41437
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Preservatives ammoniacal
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus
Picea
Aspen
Ammonia
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 23/81-82
E-40
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA)
Picea glauca - Preservation
White Spruce - Preservation
Populus - Preservation
Aspen - Preservation
Poplar - Preservation
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An accelerated decay test of needle- and conventionally-incised CCA-treated white spruce and lodgepole pine

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4398
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1998
Edition
41176
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Introduction White spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) and lodgepole pine {Pinus contorta Dougl
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1998
Edition
41176
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Picea
Series Number
W-1510
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
An accelerated decay test was set up to compare the performance of CCA-treated needle-incised white spruce and lodgepole pine heartwood with end-matched conventionally-incised material. Short lengths of 2 x 4 and comparable untreated material were installed in a warmed soil bed in the open air. After 12 years of accelerated exposure (equivalent to 15 years' natural exposure), all the treated material - spruce and lodgepole pine, needle and conventionally incised - was almost completely sound with minor patches of surface decay. In contrast, both the untreated spruce and the untreated lodgepole pine heartwood had failed due to decay. The performance of needle-incised and conventionally-incised lumber has been very similar in both species.
Preservation - Incising - Tests
Picea - Preservation
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Preservation
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
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Analyse des niveaux de declassement cause par le sechage des sciages de dimensions specifiees d'epinette-pin-sapin

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2304
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38858
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38858
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
33 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Spruce Pine Fir
SPF
Seasoning degrade
Seasoning
Drying
Series Number
E-2934
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
French
Abstract
Seasoning - Degrade
Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) - Drying
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Analysis of degrade levels in drying eastern spruce-pine-fir dimension lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1786
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38303
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Garrahan, Peter A.
Cane, D.A.
Date
April 1988
Edition
38303
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
32 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Spruce Pine Fir
SPF
Seasoning degrade
Seasoning
Drying
Series Number
3743K411
E-995
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Seasoning - Degrade
Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) - Drying
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Anatomical evaluation of the influence of incisions on the penetration of preservatives in wood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4651
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1985
Edition
41450
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) were prepared from selected mostly heartwood portions of nominal 2
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1985
Edition
41450
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
52 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Preservation
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 26b/84-85
Project no.3-70-43-387
E-135
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Jack Pine - Preservation
White Spruce - Preservation
Preservation - Incising
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An excavator-mounted rake for site preparation after partial cutting

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36562
Author
Bulley, Brian
Cormier, Denis
Date
February 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bulley, Brian
Cormier, Denis
Date
February 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Pinus
Systems
Spruce
Softwoods
Sites
Site preparation
Shelterwood
Scarifying equipment
Scarification
Regeneration
Rakes
Productivity
Preparation
Partial cutting
Series Number
Field Note ; Silviculture-FN-000074
Language
English
Abstract
Site preparation
Mechanical method
Scarifying equipment
Rakes
Prime movers
Excavators
Natural regeneration
Softwoods
White pine
White spruce
Partial cutting systems
Shelterwood cutting
Machine evaluation
Productivity
KOEHRING 6612 EXCAVATOR
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An Exploratory study of the properties of fast grown jack pine and european larch in eastern Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38108
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1986
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
123 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Trees
Pinus banksiana
Pinus
Larix
Canada
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 24/85-86
Project no.55-12-002
E-336
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Trees, Intensively Managed
Tree Crops - Eastern Canada - Properties
Jack pine
European Larch
Pinus banksiana
Larix decidua
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Assessment of two green gluing processes for finger jointing

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5074
Author
Verreault, C.
Date
April 2000
Edition
41921
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Verreault, C.
Date
April 2000
Edition
41921
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Transfer
Pinus
Spruce
Joints
Gluing
Canada
Black spruce
Balsam
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2407
E-3386
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Green finger jointing is increasingly becoming a proven possibity with three main technological processes, the New Zealand Greenweld process, the US soybean-based adhesive process and the US soybean-based adhesive process by assessing drying degrade and mechanical performance of green-glued finger-jointed material after drying. The urethane-based adhesive process was studied in a previous project. Overall, we did not observe performance differences between the Greenweld and the soybean-based adhesive processes. This was to be expected since they are both phenol resorcinol formaldehyde types of adhesives. Thus, the process choice should be made based on other considerations than mechanical performance, such as economical or procedure preferences. In comparison with the polyurethane adhesive studied before, it appears obvious that more stress concentration is present at the joint after drying because of the failure modes observed. However, with long term use, this product (the urethane-based adhesive) still needs to be studied because it is less known than the two other phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde based processes. The results also demonstrate that green finger-jointing material, such as black spruce and balsam fir, could at least be used to produce stud grade lumber.
Forintek Canada Corp. - Report
Finger Joints
Green gluing
Black spruce
Balsam fire
Technology transfer
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185 records – page 1 of 19.