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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Analyse d'une opération d'ensemencement sous abris plastique

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43883
Author
Dominy, S.W.J.
Date
January 1991
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Dominy, S.W.J.
Date
January 1991
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Planting
Silviculture
Plastics
Language
French
Documents
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Arches de plastique pour traversées temporaires de cours d'eau en forêt

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3636
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
April 2001
Edition
40347
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
April 2001
Edition
40347
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Plastics
Advantage
Series Number
Avantage ; Vol. 2, No. 7
Language
French
Abstract
Traversées de cours d'eau
Arches de plastique
Arche de plastique KWH
Machines forestières
Abstract
Le rapport traite de l'utilisation d'arches de plastique en polyéthylène haute densité (PEhd) comme traversées temporaires de cours d'eau pour permettre le passage des machines forestières. FERIC a développé ces arches de plastique, en a fait l'essai dans deux opérations et a constaté que les arches peuvent offrir une solution de rechange efficace à d'autres options, pour des portées allant jusqu'à 3 m.
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Les arches en plastiques non ondulé: un nouveau choix pour les traverses de cours d'eau

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40805
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
January 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
January 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Logging roads
Roads
Culverts
Plastics
Series Number
Communiqué technique ; Routes & ponts-CT-000057
Language
French
Abstract
Routes forestières
Traversées de cours d'eau
Ponceaux
Arches de plastique
Coûts
ARCHE KWH
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Containers for shipping seedlings – reuse or dispose?

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40678
Author
Stjernberg, Ernst
Date
July 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Stjernberg, Ernst
Date
July 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Waxes
Transport
Seedlings
Plastics
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 5, No. 26
Language
English
Abstract
In Canada, most tree seedlings are shipped from nurseries in waxed corrugated cardboard boxes. These boxes are then usually disposed of by burning or by putting into landfills. The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) investigated collapsible reusable plastic shipping containers as an alternative to waxed corrugated cardboard boxes for shipping tree seedlings. This report discusses types of tree seedling containers currently being used and tested in Canada, the feasibility of using collapsible reusable plastic shipping containers, and disposal options for waxed corrugated cardboard boxes.
Seedling transportation
Seedling containers
Collapse reusable plastic shipping containers
Waxed corrugated cardboard
Disposal
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Les contenants pour expédition de semis – les réutiliser ou s’en défaire?

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40418
Author
Stjernberg, Ernst
Date
November 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Stjernberg, Ernst
Date
November 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Transport
Treatment
Seedlings
Plastics
Advantage
Series Number
Avantage ; Vol. 5, No. 26
Language
French
Abstract
Transport de semis
Contenants pour semis
Contenants pliants
Réutilisables en plastiques
Carton ondulé ciré
Traitement
Abstract
Au Canada, les pépinières expédient la plupart des semis dans des boîtes de carton ondulé ciré. Ces boîtes sont ensuite brûlées ou déposées dans des sites d’enfouissement. L’Institut canadien de recherches en génie forestier (FERIC) a étudié la possibilité d’utiliser des contenants pliants réutilisables en plastique au lieu de boîtes de carton ondulé ciré pour l’expédition des semis. Le rapport traite des types de contenants pour semis couramment en usage ou mis à l’essai au Canada, de la faisabilité d’expédier les semis dans des contenants pliants réutilisables en plastique, ainsi que des moyens de disposer des boîtes de carton ondulé ciré.
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Market and economic analysis of the fibre-polymer composite industry

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37942
Author
Crespell, Pablo
Date
April 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Crespell, Pablo
Date
April 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
41 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Plastics
Materials
Markets
Series Number
Transformative Technologies - Federal Initiative IidentifierSeries Final Report 2008/09
W-2635
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The past year was marked by further market penetration by wood plastic composites (WPCs), although at lower rates than those seen in the previous few years. WPCs now account for 24% of deck surface and 10% of porch surface areas installed in North America. The market also witnessed the introduction of new applications for WPCs such as fencing (3% of market) and siding (0.1% of market) which have made gradual inroads as technical issues have been overcome. It was also a year marked by technical innovations, lawsuits and structural changes. In global terms, the high prices of petroleum and resins was the main driver of profitability, along with a reduced demand in the R&R US market, which drives 85% of decking and railing consumption. An additional issue for Canadian manufacturers was the devaluation of the US dollar which hurt export markets. As a consequence of sawmill curtailments and closures there has been increased competition for sawdust which is used in the wood flour component of WPCs. A detailed feasibility analysis was conducted for a hypothetical WPC plant in Canada. The exercise considered two locations, one in the West and one in the East. The products to be produced were engineered decking and railing. The results suggested a tough market environment for decking with little or no advantages given the current conditions (high resin prices and low demand and excess inventory given the U.S. housing crisis). The East location showed a slight advantage over the West. Unlike decking, railing showed good margins. Distance to markets and distribution disadvantages make this business proposition a challenging one. However, sensitivity analysis suggests that an improvement in demand and prices could narrow the gap between costs and a break even point, especially considering the conservative approach to pricing that this study followed, with US$1.56/LF FOB mill. The North American market for WPCs is over $1 billion , and categories such as decking and railing (D&R) are expected to grow in value at 7+% annual rates for the next 5 years as it moves from traditional non-structural applications into new and/or more structural applications, captures higher market share from preservative treated (PT) lumber, and as high-end products increase their participation in the mix. Among structural applications, 2009 has seen the use of WPCs in bridge construction. D&R accounts for over 80% of the total value for WPCs, followed by windows and doors parts (12%). WPCs have successfully captured around 24% of the $4.3 billion 2007 North American market for D & R, mostly from treated lumber and plastic lumber. This growth is mostly driven by repair and remodeling (85%), followed by new housing. Nonetheless, the potential total market for WPCs remains mostly untapped. Alternatives for decking applications include naturally durable species (IPE, cedar, redwood), other PT lumber (including southern yellow pine (SYP), and conifers from South America and Scandinavia), vinyl, aluminum, and others. Current WPC applications include: decking, railing, windows and door parts, roofing, picnic tables and benches, fencing, landscape timber, patios, gazebos, pergolas, auto parts, playground equipment, etc. Other applications are under development, such as siding, fencing, bridge decking, foundation isolation elements, marine structures (chocks, wales, pier decking), laminate flooring, residential furniture (bathroom/kitchen cabinets & patio furniture), utility poles, railroad tiles, exterior & interior trim (window and door (W&D) components, molding and millwork). In 2007/2008 there were about 30 main WPC producers in the US and Canada, with the top 5 holding a 70% share of the market value and the top 20 concentrating 97% of the market value. The year 2008 saw several Canadian companies go under, the most notable being Brite Manufacturing. Intellectual property continues to be an issue in this industry where some companies fiercely defend their competitive advantages via litigation. There is a big need for education of potential specifiers of WPCs as they currently show a low level of awareness and or knowledge. During 2008, industry-wide efforts led by the North American Decking and Railing Association tried to address this issue via training for contractors, suppliers and specifiers. Agricultural fibers have been used for decades in the automotive industry, with Europe as leader. Rice hull has been and will continue to be used, given its good properties (low water intake, lack of digestible nutrients that support the growth of mold and mildew), availability, and distribution channels. The latter points will likely limit the use of crop fiber only to species already readily available (e.g. wheat straw). A notable case of a company who has successfully used agrifiber is AZEC Building Products, with a 20% flax/80% PVC composite. Bioplastics continue to show great potential, especially for the packaging and automotive industries. However appealing, the use of bioplastics cannot be assumed to be environmentally harmless, but has to be determined through case by case analysis. Some biopolymers are partially biodegradable, some are not. Other issues include difficulties with recycling such as cleaning and sorting. Recent developments in Brazil include the development of the first sugar cane-based polyethylene. The developer company –Braskem- claims this resin has the same properties as the petroleum-based counterpart. As for nanocomposites, despite promising findings, more research is needed until this technology can be commercially utilized to a greater extent. For instance, nanocellulose crystals may find a place in solid applications, especially given its favorable properties for surface resistance. Last year, some Chinese manufacturers used nanoscopic board coating to make them resistant to aggressive, corrosive and adhesive substances. Apparently the market failed to give a premium for these properties, as suggested by Onix-Luxrae’s cease of operations. Consequently, even though these exciting new developments may present opportunities for some Canadian companies, it may be advisable to concentrate on potential sustainable competitive advantages, suitable for IP protection and first mover advantage. Along those lines, softwoods have made an inroad in wood flour production and there is evidence suggesting the suitability of mountain pine beetle (MPB)-damaged wood for WPCs. Current research initiatives are looking at using fibre from MDF operations.
Decking - Markets
Nanotechnology
Wood-plastic materials
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Des murets de soutènement en plastique pour ponceaux

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5414
Author
Provencher, Yves
Poitras, B.
Date
1998
Edition
36494
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Provencher, Yves
Poitras, B.
Date
1998
Edition
36494
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Culverts
Plastics
Series Number
Communiqué technique ; Routes & ponts-CT-000047
Language
English
Abstract
CONSTRUCTION ROUTIERE
Ponceaux
MURETS DE SOUTENEMENT
PLASTIQUE
Installation
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Non-corrugated plastic arches: a new choice for stream crossings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36803
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Water crossings
Water
Roads
Plastics
Costs
Series Number
Field Note ; Roads & Bridges 57
Language
English
Abstract
Forest roads
Water crossings
Culverts
Plastic arches
Costs
KWH arch
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Optimization of a newly developed process of making composites from waste wood fibre and mixed plastics

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41747
Author
Sean, Trek
Date
March 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
AND MIXED PLASTICS by Sy Trek Sean March 1996 Project No. : 3843A829 Sy Trek Sean Composite Scientist
Author
Sean, Trek
Date
March 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Recycling
Plastics
Panels
Series Number
E-2926
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Composite panels were manufactured from waste wood and recycled, mixed plastics. The effects of key processing parameters including wood fibre content on the mechanical and physical properties of panels produced were evaluated. Chemical treatments of the recycled wood fibre were conducted to improve the dispersion and adhesion of fibres within the matrix. The morphology of the plastic/wood interface was examined critically using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimental work on the hot processing of panels showed that a commercial high speed mixer, (K-mixer) failed to produce a uniform dispersion of the composite materials. The wet process studied presented a good option fro making composites from recycled wood and plastics. A significant improvement in bending strength and stiffness was observed for panels containing up to 60% wood fibre. However, because of the large amount of water required for the wet process, this technique was considered a less desirable approach. Dry processing appears to be the most environmentally sound method and produced panels with mechanical properties similar to those produced by the wet process. The SEM study on fracture interfaces elucidated the relationships between wood fibre/plastic matrix and mechanical properties of panels. Chemical treatments of recycled wood fibres were found to relieve the compatibility problem between wood and plastic, improving the adhesion between these components. Experimental work has also revealed that a commercial microwave generator can be employed to preheat mats prior to hot pressing.
Waste Wood Fibre
Mixed Plastics (Recycled)
Composite panels
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Plastic arches for temporary off-road stream crossings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40503
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
Februray 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
Februray 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Stream
Plastics
Harvesting
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 2, No. 7
Language
English
Abstract
This report discusses the use of high-density-polyethylene (HDPE) plastic arches as temporary off-road stream crossings for harvesting equipment. FERIC developed and tested these plastic in two operations and found that the arches can offer effective alternatives to other options for spans of up to 3 m.
Stream crossings
Plastic arches
KWH plastic arch
Harvesting equipment
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15 records – page 1 of 2.