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Ammoniacal wood preservatives for use in thermal diffusion treatment of wood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4663
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1983
Edition
41462
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1983
Edition
41462
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
37 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood preservation
Wood
Preservatives ammoniacal
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Picea
Aspen
Ammonia
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 11/82-83
Project no.65-57-368
E-210
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA)
Populus tremuloides - Preservation
Picea glauca - Preservation
Wood - Preservation
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An assessment of market opportunities for western Canadian aspen in the United States, Japan and Europe

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4486
Author
Gaston, Chris
Date
July 2002
Edition
41271
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gaston, Chris
Date
July 2002
Edition
41271
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
68 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
United States (USA)
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Markets
Canada
Japan
Aspen
Series Number
W-1896
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This study is a preliminary investigation of market demand for Western Canadian aspen in three major market places, the United States, Japan and Western Europe. As a preliminary investigation, there was no attempt to statistically characterize specifier populations. Rather, through consultations with industry, combined with the author's personal experiences, potential specifiers were identified and selectively interviewed. This process included aspen lumber/boards at various grades, edge-glued panels, veneer, plywood, and laminated veneer lumber. Both structural and non-structural applications were considered.
Populus tremuloides
Markets - United States
Markets - Japan
Markets - Europe
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Characteristics of Alberta's commercial tree species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub985
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Date
March 1995
Edition
37360
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Gonzalez, J.S.
Contributor
Alberta Research Council
Date
March 1995
Edition
37360
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Alberta
British Columbia
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus banksiana
Pinus
Picea
Black spruce
Betula
Balsam
Aspen
Fir
Series Number
W-1150
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This publication characterizes nine commercial tree species of Alberta. Included are descriptions of the range and volume of each species, their wood properties, and present and potential manufacturing uses.
Populus balsamifera
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Abies balsamea
Abies lasiocarpa
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl var. latifolia
Picea mariana
Picea glauca
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Comparison of four single-stem methods for controlling trembling aspen [hack-and-squirt, gel cap, EZJect, girdling]

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43367
Author
Holmsen, S.D.
Date
1990
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Holmsen, S.D.
Date
1990
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
26 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Populus tremuloides
Growth
Series Number
FO Special Report
Language
English
Abstract
In 1989, four single-stem, vegetation-control methods were used on trembling aspen overstory on two study sites, at Prince George and Kelowna North British Columbia. The study compared cost and productivity of four treatments: hack-and squirt, gel cap, EZJect, and girdling. The study also established permanent sample plots and collected baseline data for monitoring the efficacy of treatments and the effect of the treatments on understory plant communities. The project was funded by the federal direct delivery component of the Canada/BC Forest Resource Development Agreement (FRDA).
Vegetation control
Vredenburg girdling tool
GIRDLING
Hack and squirt method
Trembling aspen
Stem injection method
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Field testing of treated and untreated wood products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40982
Author
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1984
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ruddick, J.N.R.
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1984
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pentachlorophenol
Leaching
Aspen
Series Number
CFS Contract 02-65-57-051
W-203
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Tests, Stake
Preservatives - Leaching
Preservatives - Pentachlorophenol
Preservatives - Alkylammonium compound (AAC)
Populus tremuloides - Preservation
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A field test of sapstain control products for protection of unseasoned Alberta wood species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41169
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Minchin, D.
Date
March 1998
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
on the subject of the protection of aspen (Populus tremuloides), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. Latifolia
Author
Byrne, Anthony (Tony)
Minchin, D.
Contributor
Alberta Department of Economic Development and Tourism
Date
March 1998
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
37 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Alberta
British Columbia
Stain fungal
Stain
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Betula
Aspen
Series Number
W-1478
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The objective of this project was to determine the most effective, environmentally friendly treatments which will protect value-added lumber produced from Alberta wood species from fungal discoloration. This report presents information on selected sapstain control products and the efficacy results after a four-month storage period.
Stains - Fungal
Preservatives - Tests
Preservatives - Fungicides
Populus tremuloides - Preservation
Pinus contorta - Preservation
Betula papyrifera - Preservation
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Inspection of a field test of pine, spruce, and aspen shakes after five years' exposure

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41231
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Ingram, Janet K.
Date
December 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Ingram, Janet K.
Date
December 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
11 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Thuja plicata
Shingles preservation
Shingles durability
Shingles
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus
Picea
Aspen
Series Number
W-1715
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A field test under natural weathering conditions of pine, spruce, and aspen shakes, both untreated and treated with CCA-C, was established in 1995 at Vancouver, BC. Untreated western red cedar shakes were included as reference material. The shakes were inspected for decay and dimensional stability after five years of exposure. The CCA-treated samples were free of fungal attack and decay of the untreated wood was limited. In terms of splitting, untreated western red cedar was superior to the other species. Pine, both untreated and CCA-treated, was less split than spruce and aspen. CCA-treated spruce was more split than untreated, but splitting was not affected by CCA treatment in pine and aspen. In terms of erosion, untreated pine and spruce were equivalent to western red cedar while aspen was more eroded. CCA treatment reduced erosion of the shakes surface in the three species compared to untreated samples. In terms of cupping, untreated pine was equal to cedar while spruce and aspen were more cupped than pine and cedar. CCA treatment did not affect the degree of cupping.
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
Shingles - Preservation
Shingles - Durability
Pinus - Shingles
Thuja plicata - Shingles
Picea - Shingles
Populus tremuloides - Shingles
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Installation of field test of pine, spruce and aspen shakes

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub41128
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Date
June 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Alberta. Environmental Protection. Land and Forest Services.
Date
June 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
9 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Thuja plicata
Shingles preservation
Shingles durability
Shingles
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus
Picea
Aspen
Series Number
1772K635
W-1221
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This study was designed to develop long-term performance data on untreated and CCA-treated northern pine shakes in areas with low and moderate above ground decay hazard and to determine whether spruce and aspen shakes would provide comparable performance to that of pine shakes. Western red cedar shakes were included as a reference material. This report describes the set-up of the field tests and results after five days of exposure.
Shingles - Durability
Shingles - Preservation
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
Thuja plicata - Shingles
Pinus - Shingles
Picea - Shingles
Populus tremuloides - Shingles
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Machining and related mechanical properties of 15 B.C. wood species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5541
Author
Williams, D.
Morris, R.
Date
August 1998
Edition
37485
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Aspen Populus tremuloides Nelson 15.5 0.47 W. White Birch Betula papyrifera var. Prince Rupert 10.0
Author
Williams, D.
Morris, R.
Contributor
Forest Renewal BC.
Date
August 1998
Edition
37485
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Utilization
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Thuja plicata
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Picea
Mechanical properties
Larix
British Columbia
Betula
Balsam
Aspen
Fir
Series Number
Special Publication ; SP-39
W-1524
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
ISSN
ISSN 0824-2119
Abstract
The recent emphasis on producing higher value secondary wood products in British Columbia requires some changes in the way manufacturers process wood. A basic requirement in assessing whether a wood species is suitable for use as a value-added product is an understanding of the wood's machining characteristics. The objective of this study was to determine the planing, turning, shaping, boring, mortising, sanding, and fastening characteristics in clear wood sections for 15 B.C. softwood and hardwood species: 1. Amabilis Fir, 2. Douglas fir, 3. Lodgepole pine, 4. Sitka spruce, 5. Subalpine fir, 6. Western hemlock, 7. Western larch, 8. Western redcedar, 9. Western white pine, 10. Western white spruce, 11. Yellow cedar, 12. Black cottonwood, 13. Red alder, 14. Trembling aspen, 15. Western white birch. This information will aid B.C. secondary wood processors in the design and manufacture of higher value products, and help promote B.C. species and products in domestic and export markets. The study compares the machining properties of individual species within B.C.'s SPF and hem-fir groups demonstrating the benefits of sorting by individual species. In addition, the machining properties of B.C.'s under-utilized species (e.g., trembling aspen, black cottonwood) are compared to those of well established softwood species (e.g., Douglas-fir, western hemlock). Finally, the study determined the average force necessary to withdraw two types of fasteners (nail and screw) from each of the wood species. A tabular presentation of the results is included for easy comparison between species.
Mechanical properties - Machining
British Columbia woods - Utilization
Abies amabilis - Mechanical properties
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Mechanical properties
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Mechanical properties
Picea sitchensis - Mechanical properties
Abies lasiocarpa - Mechanical properties
Tsuga heterophylla - Mechanical properties
Larix occidentalis - Mechanical properties
Thuja plicata - Mechanical properties
Pinus monticola - Mechanical properties
Picea glauca - Mechanical properties
Chamaecyparis nootkatensis - Mechanical properties
Populus trichocarpa - Mechanical properties
Alnus rubra - Mechanical properties
Populus tremuloides - Mechanical properties
Betula papyrifera - Mechanical properties
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Optimized laminating of seven B.C. species

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37570
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Contributor
Forest Renewal BC.
Date
March 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
15 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Second growth
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Picea
Larix
Laminate product
Growth
British Columbia
Betula
Aspen
Series Number
W-1753
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Seven B.C. species, namely, interior Douglas fir, coastal second growth Douglas fir, western larch, lodgepole pine, western white spruce, trembling aspen and white birch were evaluated for their laminating properties using different adhesive formulations and pressing conditions. Using optimized gluing and pressing conditions, six of the B.C. species showed excellent bond quality when laminating with radio-frequency (RF) heating and either cross-linked polyvinyl acetate (PVAC) or phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF) adhesive. These laminates easily passed the shear block wood failure requirement in the ASTM-D-2559 standard and the delamination requirement in the ASTM-D-1101 standard. Because white birch which has a high density showed the highest block shear strengths for the optimum PRF adhesive formulation, this species showed the lowest average percent wood failure of the seven B.C. species and did not meet the ASTM-D-2559 wood failure requirement of 75%. Using conventional platen pressing at 20 or 25°C, laminates were prepared with different PRF adhesive formulations and the seven B.C. species. Using an optimized PRF adhesive formulation, the laminates for the seven BC species met the above ASTM standard requirements for wood failure and delamination. Overall, the percent wood failure was higher for the laminates made at 25°C indicating more resin cure. Hence, for laminates made with the optimum PRF formulation, PRF-C, the average percent wood failure for western larch at 20°C was 78% compared to 98% at 25°C.
Laminated products - Manufacture - British Columbia
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Larix occidentalis
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Picea glauca
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Second growth
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16 records – page 1 of 2.