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189 records – page 1 of 19.

5 ply, preservative treated plywood sample

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1563
Author
Morgan, E.K.
Date
October 1985
Edition
38069
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Morgan, E.K.
Contributor
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Date
October 1985
Edition
38069
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Testing
Preservation
Plywood
Series Number
3-45-68-569
E-197
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Plywood - Preservation - Testing
Plywood - Testing
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20-year evaluation of millwork preservatives

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4412
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
January 1999
Edition
41191
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
January 1999
Edition
41191
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Preservation
Series Number
W-1548
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A field test of six millwork preservatives has been ongoing for twenty years, using a simulated window corner, or "Y-joint", as the test unit. Three preservatives provided excellent protection to white pine and white spruce: 5% pentachlorophenol in varsol, phenyl mercury oleate in varsol, and 0.75% oxine copper in varsol.
Preservatives - Tests
Preservation - Durability
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25-year evaluation of millwork preservatives

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4504
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
December 2003
Edition
41291
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
. K. Ingram Wood Preservation Technologist Composites & Treated Wood Products and P. I. Morris
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
December 2003
Edition
41291
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Preservation
Series Number
W-2002
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A field test of six millwork preservatives has been ongoing for 25 years, using a "Y-joint" as the test unit. Three preservatives provided excellent protection to white pine and white spruce: 5% pentachlorophenol in varsol, phenyl mercury oleate in varsol, and 0.75% oxine copper in varsol.
Preservatives - Tests
Preservation - Durability
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Advanced technologies to improve penetration of wood treatments : biological incising with Dichomitus squalens in spruce and pine lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42460
Author
Dale, Angela
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Dale, Angela
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Preservation
Pinus
Picea
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FPI#117W
W-2823
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Canadian wood species such as spruce and pine are difficult to treat with wood preservatives or other wood enhancing formulations due to a thin sapwood band and refractory heartwood. One method of improving penetration is by biological incising. Biological incising with Dichomitus squalens was originally developed in Austria in the 1990s to increase the permeability of European spruce prior to treatment with wood preservatives. Recently the patents on this technology lapsed. It was considered unlikely that industrial use of a European white-rot fungus would be acceptable in Canada. FPInnovations therefore conducted a screening test of a range of Canadian isolates of various white-rot fungi to identify an isolate that would be suitable for biological incising of Canadian spruce and pine. Under pure culture conditions, one isolate of Dichomitus squalens isolated from white spruce was found to greatly increase the permeability of the wood, particularly in spruce. The objective of the current study was to determine if these results could be achieved on commercial sized wood under non-sterile conditions more similar to an industrial setting. Lumber samples, 3.8 cm by 8.9 cm by 400 cm in length were incubated in plastic totes with fungal inoculum. Two isolates of fungi were tested as well as two different decontamination methods (steam and Benomyl solution) and two time frames (4 and 6 weeks). Through treatment of spruce samples (19 mm penetration) with 1.7% ACQ was achieved after six weeks incubation with D. squalens 78A (a spruce isolate). In matched samples treated with MCA, a minimum of 10 mm penetration was achieved in 90% of the samples. Strength loss in some individual samples was higher than adjustment factors for conventional incising (over 25%) suggesting that incubation time may need to be shortened. Preservative penetration was more variable in pine but permeability was increased; 60% of the samples reached a minimum penetration of 5 mm. Incubation time and conditions may need to be adjusted to achieve more consistent results. The results of this study show that biological incising can greatly improve the permeability of spruce and pine and can be achieved on 38 by 89 dimension lumber under conditions that could be utilized in an industrial setting. Future work should focus on determining incubation conditions that allow penetration requirements in Canadian standards to be met with acceptable strength loss.
Picea - Preservation
Pinus - Preservation
Preservation - Incising
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Advanced technologies to improve wood penetration : alternative incising technologies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42457
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives penetration
Preservatives
Preservation
Penetration
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FPI 117W
W-2820
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The biggest obstacle to the enhancement of wood properties through any form of chemical treatment is the impermeability of the heartwood of virtually all Canadian Wood species and their relatively narrow sapwood. Incisors using toothed rollers are commonplace in Canadian treating plants but they are not used for many products due to the detrimental effect on surface appearance. Alternative incising technologies anticipated to have less effects on surface appearance have been investigated over the past 30 years. This report revisits four of these technologies, lasers, needles, water jets and biological incising and evaluates their potential for further investigation based on recent advances in technology. Even using the latest technology, laser incising would be too slow and too expensive for a Canadian treating plant. Needle incising would be too slow but the equipment cost should not be an issue. Water jet treatment would also be too slow and the equipment cost is unknown. Biological incising is a very different approach involving batch processing. The major factor would be the cost of inventory which depends on the duration of incubation yet to be determined.
Preservatives - Penetration
Preservation - Incising
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Advanced technologies to improve wood penetration : preliminary screening of fungi with potential for bioincising

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42470
Author
Dale, Angela
Symons, Paul D.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
November 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Dale, Angela
Symons, Paul D.
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
November 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservation
Growth
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FPI 117W
W-2855
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A major constraint to the Canadian wood preservation industry in both domestic and export markets is the difficulty of penetrating Canadian wood species with preservatives. FPInnovations has put considerable effort into various forms of improved mechanical incising but these have not been adopted by the industry due to adverse effects on throughput and appearance of the final product. Recently, work in Europe has shown promising results from biological incising using white-rot fungi that colonize wood relatively rapidly but decay slowly. The use of European isolates of fungi in North America may be constrained by phytosanitary concerns. This report covers an experiment to screen North American isolates of white-rot fungi for potential as biological control agents. A modification of the soil-block test method was used to evaluate the ability of a range of fungi to improve permeability without affecting strength properties. Wood samples were exposed to the fungi for zero, two, four and six week time increments and were then treated with a 1.5% ACQ-D solution. Preservative uptake was calculated based on change in weight before and after treatment. Two isolates of Dichomitus squalens were found that dramatically increased preservative uptake. These samples were tested for strength loss and preservative penetration. Spruce samples exposed to D. squalens isolate 78A for six weeks were completely penetrated with preservative (19 mm depth) in all six samples. D. squalens 78B also showed promising results in pine and spruce samples based on uptake and penetration data. No stiffness loss was detected in any of these samples based on results from the crushing tests.
Preservation - Incising
Fungi - Growth
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Ammoniacal wood preservatives for use in non-pressure treatment of spruce and aspen poplar

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4638
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1982
Edition
41437
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
of researchers involved with wood preservation. However, as with any preservative system, the economic aspects
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1982
Edition
41437
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Preservatives ammoniacal
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus
Picea
Aspen
Ammonia
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 23/81-82
E-40
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA)
Picea glauca - Preservation
White Spruce - Preservation
Populus - Preservation
Aspen - Preservation
Poplar - Preservation
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Ammoniacal wood preservatives for use in thermal diffusion treatment of wood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4663
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1983
Edition
41462
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1983
Edition
41462
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
37 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood preservation
Wood
Preservatives ammoniacal
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Picea
Aspen
Ammonia
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 11/82-83
Project no.65-57-368
E-210
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA)
Populus tremuloides - Preservation
Picea glauca - Preservation
Wood - Preservation
Documents
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An accelerated decay test of needle- and conventionally-incised CCA-treated white spruce and lodgepole pine

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4398
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1998
Edition
41176
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Preservation Technologist Wood Preservation Scientist Composites & Treated Wood Products Composites & Treated
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1998
Edition
41176
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Picea
Series Number
W-1510
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
An accelerated decay test was set up to compare the performance of CCA-treated needle-incised white spruce and lodgepole pine heartwood with end-matched conventionally-incised material. Short lengths of 2 x 4 and comparable untreated material were installed in a warmed soil bed in the open air. After 12 years of accelerated exposure (equivalent to 15 years' natural exposure), all the treated material - spruce and lodgepole pine, needle and conventionally incised - was almost completely sound with minor patches of surface decay. In contrast, both the untreated spruce and the untreated lodgepole pine heartwood had failed due to decay. The performance of needle-incised and conventionally-incised lumber has been very similar in both species.
Preservation - Incising - Tests
Picea - Preservation
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Preservation
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
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Anatomical evaluation of the influence of incisions on the penetration of preservatives in wood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4651
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1985
Edition
41450
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Keith, C.T.
Date
March 1985
Edition
41450
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
52 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Preservation
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 26b/84-85
Project no.3-70-43-387
E-135
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Jack Pine - Preservation
White Spruce - Preservation
Preservation - Incising
Documents
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189 records – page 1 of 19.