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248 records – page 1 of 25.

20-year evaluation of millwork preservatives

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4412
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
January 1999
Edition
41191
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
January 1999
Edition
41191
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Preservation
Series Number
W-1548
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A field test of six millwork preservatives has been ongoing for twenty years, using a simulated window corner, or "Y-joint", as the test unit. Three preservatives provided excellent protection to white pine and white spruce: 5% pentachlorophenol in varsol, phenyl mercury oleate in varsol, and 0.75% oxine copper in varsol.
Preservatives - Tests
Preservation - Durability
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24 month evaluation of novel UV protection systems. Second Year Report 2004/05

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4530
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Date
March 2005
Edition
41317
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
anticipate a change from copper-based preservatives to metal-free combinations of organics for residential
Author
Morris, Paul I.
McFarling, S.M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2005
Edition
41317
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 35;3226
W-2134
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A transparent coating with long-term performance could help wood maintain its share of residential markets against material substitution and potentially expand markets in recreational property and non-residential buildings. While transparent coatings can be made reasonably resistant to UV some UV likely penetrates to the wood and by necessity clear coatings are transparent to visible light. Visible light can also cause damage over the long term thus the underlying wood needs additional protection. Four novel UV protection systems were tested as pre-treatments on uncoated wood and under three coatings, a water-based film forming coating, a water-based acrylic varnish and a solvent based water repellent. Samples were exposed to natural weathering facing South at 45° at a test site in Gulfport, Mississippi, in collaboration with the USDA Forest Products Laboratory. The test material was inspected every six months for discolouration, mold and stain, coating water repellency, flaking, erosion and cracking and substrate condition. After 24 months exposure, coatings over the combination of UV absorber and lignin stabilizer identified by Stephen Ayer were performing better than the same coatings applied over the combination recommended by Ciba and coatings over both pre-treatments were performing substantially better than controls with no pre-treatment. Projection of fitted curves beyond the data appears to indicate that pretreatment may double the life expectancy of the coating. There was no consistent effect of the synergists on either combination at this time.
Preservatives - Tests
Finishes - Exterior - Tests
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25-year evaluation of millwork preservatives

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4504
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
December 2003
Edition
41291
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
No.: 1054 25-Year Evaluation of Millwork Preservatives by J
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
December 2003
Edition
41291
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Preservation
Series Number
W-2002
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A field test of six millwork preservatives has been ongoing for 25 years, using a "Y-joint" as the test unit. Three preservatives provided excellent protection to white pine and white spruce: 5% pentachlorophenol in varsol, phenyl mercury oleate in varsol, and 0.75% oxine copper in varsol.
Preservatives - Tests
Preservation - Durability
Documents
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Accelerated preservative evaluation

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4202
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Ingram, Janet K.
Date
March 1989
Edition
40943
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Ingram, Janet K.
Date
March 1989
Edition
40943
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
52 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Series Number
CFS No. 3
W-694
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Summary included
Preservatives - Tests, Stake
Preservatives - Tests, Accelerated
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Accelerated preservative evaluation in ground contact using the FAB

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5864
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Parker, L.
Smith, R.S.
Date
March 1987
Edition
41028
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
f i e l d t r i a l s f o r the evaluation of e x i s t i n g , new or modified wood preservatives
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Parker, L.
Smith, R.S.
Date
March 1987
Edition
41028
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives tests
Preservatives
Series Number
CFS No. 7;02-17-10-397
W-456
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Tests, Accelerated
Preservatives - Tests - Fungus cellar
Documents
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Advanced technologies to improve wood penetration : alternative incising technologies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42457
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives penetration
Preservatives
Preservation
Penetration
Series Number
Value to Wood No. FPI 117W
W-2820
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The biggest obstacle to the enhancement of wood properties through any form of chemical treatment is the impermeability of the heartwood of virtually all Canadian Wood species and their relatively narrow sapwood. Incisors using toothed rollers are commonplace in Canadian treating plants but they are not used for many products due to the detrimental effect on surface appearance. Alternative incising technologies anticipated to have less effects on surface appearance have been investigated over the past 30 years. This report revisits four of these technologies, lasers, needles, water jets and biological incising and evaluates their potential for further investigation based on recent advances in technology. Even using the latest technology, laser incising would be too slow and too expensive for a Canadian treating plant. Needle incising would be too slow but the equipment cost should not be an issue. Water jet treatment would also be too slow and the equipment cost is unknown. Biological incising is a very different approach involving batch processing. The major factor would be the cost of inventory which depends on the duration of incubation yet to be determined.
Preservatives - Penetration
Preservation - Incising
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Alternate uses for wood treated with carbon-based preservatives at the end of service life

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42901
Author
Stirling, Rod
Daniels, C. Robert
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Stirling, Rod
Daniels, C. Robert
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Waste utilization
Utilization
Recycling
Preservatives carbon
Preservatives
Series Number
W-2976
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The absence of commercial facilities to recycle or recover value from wood treated with metal-based wood preservatives at the end of its service life is one of the most significant negative points in the generally positive life cycle analysis of treated wood. Wood treated with carbon-based preservatives (metal-free) may be far easier to recycle or recover value from since the preservatives are relatively vulnerable to thermal, chemical and biological breakdown. As a result they might be destroyed by kraft pulping, combustion or composting of treated wood. The present research evaluates the use of carbon-based preservative-treated wood in these processes. Kraft pulps produced from wood freshly treated with recommended loadings of carbon-based preservatives contained significant quantities of didecyldimethylammonium carbonate (DDAcarbonate), propiconazole and tebuconazole. However, lower preservative concentration in the wood and intensive pulping may be able to produce pulps without detectable preservatives. The azoles were also detected in significant quantities in the black liquor (DDAcarbonate was not analysed in black liquor). No azoles were found in the ash produced from combustion, but significant quantities were detected in the filtered smoke. DDAcarbonate was not detected in the filtered smoke. Analysis of DDAcarbonate in ash was inconclusive. A composting experiment has been set up and is in progress. Data on preservative breakdown during composting is expected next year.
RECYCLING
Preservatives - Carbon
Waste - Utilization for pulp
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Ammoniacal wood preservatives for use in non-pressure treatment of spruce and aspen poplar

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4638
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1982
Edition
41437
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
ÊVO AMMONIACAL WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR USE IN NON-PRESSURE TREATMENT OF SPRUCE AND ASPEN POPLAR
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1982
Edition
41437
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Pinus
Spruce
Preservatives ammoniacal
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus
Picea
Aspen
Ammonia
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 23/81-82
E-40
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA)
Picea glauca - Preservation
White Spruce - Preservation
Populus - Preservation
Aspen - Preservation
Poplar - Preservation
Documents
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Ammoniacal wood preservatives for use in thermal diffusion treatment of wood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4663
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1983
Edition
41462
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Ralph, C.D.
Date
March 1983
Edition
41462
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
37 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood preservation
Wood
Preservatives ammoniacal
Preservatives
Preservation
Populus tremuloides
Populus
Picea
Aspen
Ammonia
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 11/82-83
Project no.65-57-368
E-210
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Preservatives - Ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA)
Populus tremuloides - Preservation
Picea glauca - Preservation
Wood - Preservation
Documents
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An accelerated decay test of needle- and conventionally-incised CCA-treated white spruce and lodgepole pine

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4398
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1998
Edition
41176
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
with waterbome preservatives (Cooper 1973). Indeed, lodgepole pine heartwood is commonly found to be equally
Author
Ingram, Janet K.
Morris, Paul I.
Date
June 1998
Edition
41176
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Preservatives chromated copper arsenate CCA
Preservatives
Preservation
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Picea
Series Number
W-1510
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
An accelerated decay test was set up to compare the performance of CCA-treated needle-incised white spruce and lodgepole pine heartwood with end-matched conventionally-incised material. Short lengths of 2 x 4 and comparable untreated material were installed in a warmed soil bed in the open air. After 12 years of accelerated exposure (equivalent to 15 years' natural exposure), all the treated material - spruce and lodgepole pine, needle and conventionally incised - was almost completely sound with minor patches of surface decay. In contrast, both the untreated spruce and the untreated lodgepole pine heartwood had failed due to decay. The performance of needle-incised and conventionally-incised lumber has been very similar in both species.
Preservation - Incising - Tests
Picea - Preservation
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - Preservation
Preservatives - Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)
Documents
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248 records – page 1 of 25.