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Analytical and experimental assessment of heel bending moments [for trusses]

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5305
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Date
April 2003
Edition
42178
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2003
Edition
42178
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Design
Series Number
CFS Simple Progress Report No. 10
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Trusses - Design
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Assessment of fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected truss applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2669
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39268
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39268
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
59 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
AFRI ; 201000788
W-2748
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
There is interest in the lumber and truss industry to supply and use fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected wood trusses. To support this, it is necessary to provide evidence that fingerjoined lumber meeting the requirements of a recognized fingerjoined lumber product standard can be used with the lumber design provision provided in the governing wood engineering design code. In consultation with the truss and lumber industry, it was agreed that fingerjoined machine graded lumber meeting the requirements of the National Lumber Grades Authority (NLGA) Special Product Standard 4 (SPS 4) would be assessed for truss applications. The assessment would need to show no issues with applying the lumber design provisions in Clause 5.5.13 of CSA O86, the Canadian Engineering Design in Wood Code, to NLGA SPS 4 fingerjoined lumber. This is necessary because Clause 5.5.13 was originally developed for non-fingerjoined lumber and applies specifically to the design of lumber in truss applications. The tests carried out under this program included bending test specimens with 1 to 4 joints per specimen tested to failure under three different bending moment configurations, and single fingerjoints tested to failure under pure axial tension or compression, and then under eccentrically applied axial tension or compression to induce bending in addition to the axial loading. All test specimens were prepared using a 2100f-1.8E grade spruce-pine-fir lumber and because the test to failure was typically less than 5 minutes, polyvinyl acetate (PVA) adhesive was used to bond the fingerjoints to facilitate joint fabrication. Additional testing was also carried out to extend the testing protocol developed in 2008-09 for assessing fingerjoint adhesives under sustained tension loads. Samples bonded with a known performing adhesive, phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), were substituted with samples bonded with PVA, a known poor performer under sustained loads. In the bending test, test span configuration and characteristic number of joints showed strong effects on the average bending capacity of the fingerjoints. While more joints in the region of maximum bending moment were expected to contribute to lower bending capacities, this was not as evident in this study. This is likely due to the small sample sizes and the tight control over the joint strength (i.e. low strength variability). Instead, having one or more fingerjoints in the maximum moment zone but near the load points appeared to have a stronger effect. The bending strength reductions were on the order of 5 to 10%. In the combined loading test, loading eccentricity showed a strong effect on the capacity of the fingerjoints in both tension-bending and compression-bending. The tension-bending interaction should be noted for those evaluating online or offline tension test results. Both the tension-bending and compression-bending results are consistent with the assumptions in the CSA O86 design code.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger - Tests
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Behaviour of truss plate joints under shear loading

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1551
Author
Lau, P.W.C.
Date
April 1984
Edition
38057
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lau, P.W.C.
Date
April 1984
Edition
38057
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Testing
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 5/83-84
E-155
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Truss Plate Connector - Testing
Trusses - Testing
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Benchmarking wood use in roofs of multi-family housing in China

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1260
Author
Wahl, A.
Date
May 2004
Edition
37718
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
surveys were carried out for benchmarking wood use in roofs in China. The first survey was part
Author
Wahl, A.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment.
Date
May 2004
Edition
37718
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Roofs
Markets
China
Building construction
Series Number
4281
W-2099
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This benchmarking study aims at providing the Canadian industry, agencies and governments with the necessary understanding of the knowledge and perception of wood roof trusses among specifiers in selected urban regions in China for ongoing and future promotions of wood roof trusses in China. The objectives of this project are the following: 1. Assess current awareness, knowledge and perception of wood roof trusses in multi-family housing among specifiers (architects, engineers and builders/developers); 2. Examine how decisions on roofing/building systems and materials are made; 3. Determine best ways to transfer knowledge about wood roof truss systems to specifiers. Two separate surveys were carried out for benchmarking wood use in roofs in China. The first survey was part of a survey of Chinese building specifiers (Benchmarking Chinese Building Specifiers (Cohen and Ding 2004)) carried out in October/November 2003. A second survey was administered during the Conference on Hybrid Building Construction in China and Wood Roof Truss Workshops in Shanghai and Beijing in December 2003.
Forest products - Markets - China
Building construction - China
Roofs
Documents
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Computer analysis of parallel chord truss systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37241
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 1991
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 1991
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
32 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Compression
Mechanical properties
Simulation
Joints
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 12;5410P001
W-858
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The report presents the verification of two truss analysis computer programs developed at Forintek. Validation consisted of comparing the computed truss deflections with the deflections measured from full scale truss tests conducted at Forintek. Issues which should be considered when modeling parallel chord trusses using either of the two computer models are discussed. A strategy for estimating lateral load sharing and composite action in flat roof and floor systems using these models with the Floor Analysis Program (FAP) is discussed.
Trusses - Computer simulation
Joints and fastenings - Strength - Computer simulation
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Conception performante d’enveloppes de bâtiments à ossature de bois appliquée à la construction industrialisée

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8159
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Date
Mai 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
Mai 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Construction
Energy efficiency
Exterior
Roofs
Walls
Series Number
InfoNote 2021 No.21
Language
French
Abstract
Le présent document a été élaboré en vue de faciliter la construction industrialisée d'enveloppes de bâtiments à base de bois (murs extérieurs, toits), et donc de répondre aux exigences accrues en matière d'efficacité énergétique.
Documents

InfoNote2021N21F.pdf

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Energy efficient wood-frame building envelope assemblies in industrialized construction

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8158
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Date
May 2021
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
for exterior walls and roofs based on the 2015 NECB, with the thermal resistance expressed in both effective
Author
Holcroft, Neal
Lafond, Cassandra
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service.
Date
May 2021
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Buildings
Construction
Energy efficiency
Exterior
Roofs
Walls
Series Number
InfoNote 2021 No.21
Language
English
Abstract
This document has been developed to facilitate industrialized construction for wood-based building envelopes (exterior wall, roof) to meet increased energy efficiency requirements.
Documents

InfoNote2021N21E.pdf

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Exploratory study of the short-term and long-term behavior of truss-plate joints in tension under ambient laboratory conditions

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36907
Author
Palka, L.C.
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Palka, L.C.
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
59 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Tension
Mechanical properties
Joints
Alloy
Series Number
CFS No. 18
contract no.87-54-10C-009
W-566
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Trusses
Joints and fastenings
Connectors, Metal plate
Strength - Tension - Tests
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Field measurement of vertical movement and roof moisture performance of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49839
Author
Wang, Jieying
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Wang, Jieying
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
41 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wetting
Drying
Performance
Water repellents
Roofs
Language
English
Abstract
Two of the major topics of interest to those designing taller and larger wood buildings are the susceptibility to differential movement and the likelihood of mass timber components drying too slowly after they become wet during construction. The Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George, British Columbia provides a unique opportunity for non-destructive testing and monitoring to measure the ‘As Built’ performance of a relatively tall mass timber building. Field measurements also provide performance data to support regulatory and market acceptance of wood-based systems in tall and large buildings. This report covers vertical movement and roof moisture performance measured from this building for about three and a half years, with sensors installed during the construction. The report first describes instrumentation. The locations selected for installing displacement sensors for measuring vertical movement comprised of the following: glued-laminated timber (glulam) columns together with cross-laminated timber (CLT) floors on three lower floors; a glulam column together with a parallel strand lumber (PSL) transfer beam on the first floor; and a CLT shear wall of the core structure on each floor from the second up to the top floor. Sensors were also installed to measure environmental conditions (temperature and relative humidity) in the immediate vicinity of the components being monitored. In addition, six locations in the timber roof were selected and instrumented for measuring moisture changes in the wood as well as the local environmental conditions. Most sensors went into operation in the middle of March 2014, after the roof sheathing was installed. The monitoring showed that the wood inside the building reached an average moisture content (MC) of about 5% in the winter heating seasons and about 8% in the summer, from an initial MC of about 13% during the construction. Glulam columns were extremely stable dimensionally given the changes in MC and loading conditions. With a height of over 5 m and 6 m, the two glulam columns monitored on the first floor showed very small amounts of vertical movement, about 2 mm (0.04%) and 3 mm (0.05%), respectively, over a period of about three years and a half. Assuming the two monitored columns are representative of the other columns along the column line, the cumulative shortening of the six glulam columns along the height of the building would be about 12 mm (0.05%), not taking into account deformation at connection details or effects of reduced loads on upper floors. The CLT wall was found to be also dimensionally stable along the height of the building. The measurements showed that the entire CLT wall, from Floor 1 to Floor 6, would shorten about 19 mm (0.08%). The PSL transfer beam had a reduction of about 12 mm (1%) in the depth, i.e., along the building height. The CLT floor panels also showed considerable vertical movement of about 5 mm (3%) in the thickness direction. All the differential movement was expected and taken into consideration in the design and construction of the building. In terms of the roof performance, two locations, both with a wet concrete layer poured above the plywood sheathing, showed wetness during the construction but continued to dry afterwards. The satisfactory drying performance can be attributed to the interior ventilation function designed for the roof assemblies by integrating strapping between the sheathing and the mass timber beams below.
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Fingerjoined lumber for long span truss applications : Phase II

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37728
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lum, Conroy
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 45;4320
W-2157
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The intent of this project is to systematically build the infrastructure to expand the end uses of fingerjoined lumber products. Through fingerjoining lumber, the lumber industry may be able to produce a product that helps the truss industry remain competitive. While not all of the advantages of steel can be countered, fingerjoining should provide some flexibility to lumber producers so that they can continue to meet the needs of the wood truss industry. Based on the results of the first phase and on the discussions that followed, the IWG suggested a number of other potential issues to be further examined for particularly long-span trusses in a follow-up two-year project.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger
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48 records – page 1 of 5.