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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Ability of three harvesting systems to limit rutting on a clay site

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3839
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Date
February 2002
Edition
40558
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Date
February 2002
Edition
40558
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Tree lengths
Trees
Systems
Stroke delimbers
Soil
Skidders
Short wood
Rutting
Processors
Harvesting
Advantage
Soft soil
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 2, No. 46
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC compared three harvesting systems (full-tree, tree-length, and cut-to length) on a clay site in northwestern Québec. None of the systems limited rutting to below the acceptable target level; however, cut-to-length harvesting (using a three-machine system) showed slightly better results than the other two systems.
Full-tree harvesting
Tree-length systems
Cut-to-length harvesting systems
Rutting
Ground disturbance
Clay soils
Feller bunchers
Stroke delimbers
Processors
Shortwood forwarders
Grapple skidders
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Comparing green and seasoned forest access roads in northern Alberta

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40588
Author
Bradley, Allan
Date
July 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bradley, Allan
Date
July 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Trucks
Tires
Systems
Seasoning
Rutting
Roads
Logs
Sample
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 27
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC conducted two trials in northern Alberta to evaluate alternative methods of constructing temporary forest access roads in areas where gravel is scarce and fine-grained soils predominate. The trials compared the performance of V-ditch, 0.5-m Lift, and o.5-m Lift-over-rootmat designs constructed with and without compaction. The report summarizes the key findings from the study for use as a road building reference.
Logging trucks
Central tire inflation systems
Roads
Forest roads
Seasoned
Green
Compacted
Rutting
Alberta
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Effects of skidder traffic on two types of forest soils

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36809
Author
Meek, Philippe
Date
November 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Meek, Philippe
Date
November 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Compaction
Rutting
Soil disturbance
Soil
Skidders
Sample
FPI TR
Soft soil
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR-000117
Language
English
Abstract
In Canadian boreal forests, harvesting with protection of advance regeneration requires the creation of an intensively used network of skid trails. In this context, the effects of repeated skidder passes on soils were studied in terms of rut depth, the amount of displaced material in the trails, and soil bulks density. Two types of soil were studied: sands and clays. The factors that helped to explain the observed amount of soil disturbance were the number of skidder passes, the amount of wheel slippage, soil density, the soil's penetration resistance, and the soil's shear resistance. The results of the study indicated that the effects of skidder traffic on soil properties stabilized after a few skidder passes on sands, whereas the effects on clay soils continued to increase with an increasing number of skidder passes.
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Evaluation of forest access road designs for use with CTI-equipped logging trucks I: green access roads

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40545
Author
Bradley, Allan
Date
July 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bradley, Allan
Date
July 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Trucks
Transport
Tires
Systems
Rutting
Road transportation
Roads
Performance
Logs
Sample
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 2, No. 53
Language
English
Abstract
A forestry operation in northern Alberta constructs its temporary access roads with native, fine-grained materials and uses these roads during both frozen and unfrozen conditions. The log hauling fleet associated with this operation utilizes central tire inflation systems to reduce road damage and improve mobility. This first of two reports describes an evaluation of the design and construction of temporary access roads trafficked in the same year that they were constructed; quantifies grading maintenance savings resulting from the use of road surface compaction and optimized tire inflation pressures; and discusses the validation of a USDA Forest Service rutting model and its potential for use in other applications.
Road transportation
Logging trucks
Tires
Central tire inflation systems
Roads
Forest roads
Compaction
Rutting
Performance
Evaluation
Alberta
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Evaluation of forest access road designs for use with CTI-equipped log haul trucks phase II: seasoned access roads

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40568
Author
Bradley, Allan
Date
April 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bradley, Allan
Date
April 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Trucks
Transport
Tires
Systems
Seasoning
Rutting
Road transportation
Roads
Performance
Logs
Sample
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 7
Language
English
Abstract
A forestry operation in northern Alberta constructs its temporary access roads with native, fine-grained materials and uses these roads during both frozen and unfrozen conditions. The log hauling fleet associated with this operation utilizes central tire inflation systems to reduce road damage and improve mobility. This second of three reports describes an evaluation of the design and construction of temporary access roads trafficked one year after construction; quantifies grading maintenance savings resulting from the use of road seasoning and optimized tire inflation pressures; and discusses the validation of a USDA Forest Service rutting model and its potential for use in other applications.
Road transportation
Logging trucks
Tires
Central tire inflation systems
Roads
Forest roads
Seasoned
Green
Compaction
Rutting
Performance
Evaluation
Alberta
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Optimizing the results of HPRS: Best practices guide

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40742
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Date
July 2006
Material Type
Guide
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Date
July 2006
Material Type
Guide
Research report
Physical Description
50 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Tree lengths
Trees
Soil disturbance
Soil
Rutting
Regeneration
Harvesting
Harvesting equipment
Advantage
Soft soil
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 7, No. 6
Language
English
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Planning landings and trails

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7966
Author
Partington, Mark
McPherson, Scott
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Fibre Supply
of landings and trails can help minimize soil damage such as compaction, rutting, erosion and nutrient loss
Author
Partington, Mark
McPherson, Scott
Contributor
Great Lakes St.Lawrence Forest Region of Ontario
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Erosion
Partial cutting
Rutting
Water quality
Series Number
Reduce Damage During Partial Cut Operations
Language
English
Abstract
This guide helps forest workers with best management practices and guidelines that, if applied, will help ensure good water quality and future tree growth.
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Predicting soil trafficability: Project summary of FPInnovations contribution

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40017
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
May 2015
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
. ........................................................................................ 14 Figure 8. Typical soil rutting found in the softwood dominated lowlands
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
May 2015
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
18 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Harvesting
Soil
Rutting
Productivity
Costs
Tires
Trucks
FOP Technical Report
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2015 n.20 RESTRICTED
Language
English
Abstract
The use of high resolution mapping products, increased knowledge of machine/soil impacts and advanced forest landscape modelling offer the opportunity to develop predictive tools to aid in forest operations planning. FPInnovations has been involved in a joint project with the University of New Brunswick and J.D. Irving Ltd. to develop a soil trafficability prediction model to enhance in-block planning and to reduce soil disturbance. This report provides a summary of FPInnovations contributions to this project.
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Preventing soil compaction and rutting in the boreal forest of Western Canada: a practical guide to operating timber-harvesting equipment

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40623
Author
Sutherland, Brad
Date
May 2003
Material Type
Guide
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Sutherland, Brad
Date
May 2003
Material Type
Guide
Research report
Physical Description
51 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Mechanical properties
Compaction
Soil
Rutting
Sample
Harvesting
Advantage
Soft soil
Moisture
Harvesting equipment
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 7
Language
English
Abstract
When forest harvesting equipment moves across a cutblock, soil compaction and/or rutting can result. Forest practitioners are therefore concerned about the long-term effects of harvesting on forest soil health, water quality, and tree growth. The purpose of this handbook is to provide practical advice to forestry contractors and equipment operators, and their field supervisors, about the risk of damage to forest soils during harvesting operations, and how to avoid it. The opportunity to protect forest soil occurs at each step of the forestmanagement process, from harvest planning to field layout to harvesting and post-harvesting activities. Operators of forestry equipment, harvesting contractors, and field supervisors are vital links in this process. To help identify when the health of forest soil is at risk, this handbook offers a brief introduction about forest soils, and explains why and how soil is susceptible to damage. The soil terminology used is defined in a glossary along with other equipment related terms (Appendix I). For harvesting contractors and equipment operators, the handbook explains how visual indicators like landscape features and tree species can be used to estimate soil moisture, and offers simple field tests to help them anticipate when soils become at risk. For contractors, equipment features that influence soil compaction and rutting are discussed, and operating techniques to reduce soil damage are suggested. For field supervisors, harvest scheduling options that minimize soil damage are included. As well, the handbook offers ways to modify harvesting operations when soils have become susceptible to damage. Maintaining soil health during harvesting requires knowing when soils are at increased risk of compaction and rutting, and understanding how equipment operation interacts with the soil. If contractors, operators, and field supervisors can anticipate susceptible soil types and conditions, they will be able to plan ahead and make changes to their operating schedules and techniques. Recommendations made in this handbook regarding equipment and operating techniques are to serve as guidelines only. Local operating conditions and regulations, as well as equipment availability, must be considered when interpreting this information.
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9 records – page 1 of 1.