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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Accelerated aging and outdoor weathering of aspen waferboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4743
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
, the second in a prairie . location, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and the third in a maritime location
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Alberta
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Waferboards
Utilization
Aspen
Aging
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 1
E-1235
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Waferboard
Aspen - Utilization
Waferboard - Aging
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Chip recovery and productivity of frozen and unfrozen hardwood and softwood at a Saskatchewan pulp mill

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3896
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
March 2003
Edition
40619
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
March 2003
Edition
40619
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Woodrooms
Saskatchewan
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Productivity
Chippers
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 5
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) evaluated wood chip recovery and productivity at Weyerhaeuser Company Limited's pulp mill in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Frozen and unfrozen hardwood and softwood logs were debarked and shipped over a range of butt diameters and lengths. This report summarizes the chip recovery, quality, and productivity, and provides recommendations on how the operation and chip recovery can be improved.
Chips
Chipping
Woodrooms
Debarking
Chip quality
Chip recovery
Chipping productivity
Drum debarkers
Disc chippers
Saskatchewan
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Comparison of two site preparation treatments using the Meri Crusher

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40483
Author
Mitchell, Janet L.
Date
October 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Mitchell, Janet L.
Date
October 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Vegetation
Sites
Site preparation
Scarifying equipment
Scarification
Saskatchewan
Preparation
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 1, No. 24
Language
English
Abstract
Mistik Management Ltd. has been using a Meri Crusher mounted on a small loader since 1998 to prepare sites for planting. The Meri Crusher mulches the organic material and mixes the mulched material with mineral soil to create a mixed microsite to favour planted white spruce and provide vegetation control from Calamagrostis canadensis (marsh reed grass) and aspen. However, harvesting in aspen and mixedwood forests creates moderate to high slash loading. When the Meri Crusher is used for site preparation, these slash loadings have led to low machine productivity.
Site preparation
Scarifying equipment
Vegetation control
Crushers (silv.)
Mulching
Comparison
Meri crusher
Saskatchewan
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Débrousailleuse Silvana Selective/Ford Versatile utilisée dans l'ouest du Canada: une évaluation

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40773
Author
St-Amour, Michel
Mitchell, Janet L.
Date
January 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
St-Amour, Michel
Mitchell, Janet L.
Date
January 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
10 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Tractors
Saskatchewan
Productivity
Plantations
Alberta
Series Number
Fiche technique ; FT-000225
Language
French
Abstract
En 1993, FERIC a effectué des études de courte et de longue durée pour évaluer le débroussailleur de fabrication suédoise Silvana Selective monté sur un véhicule moteur Ford Versatile contruit au Canada, alors que la machine travaillait dans des opérations d'éclaircie précommerciale et de dégagement de plantations en Colombie-Britannique, en Alberta et en Saskatchewan.
Éclaircie précommerciale
DÉGAGEMENT
Plantations
ENTRETIEN DES PEUPLEMENTS
Méthode mécanisée
ACCESSOIRES DE DÉBROUSSAILLEMENT
TRACTEURS A CHASSIS ARTICULÉ
ÉVALUATION DE MACHINES
Productivité
Coûts
DÉBROUSSAILLEUR SILVANA SELECTIVE
TRACTEUR FORD VERSATILE
Colombie-Britannique
Alberta
Saskatchewan
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Effect of growth rate on wood density of Saskatchewan white spruce : implications for silvicultural practices. Final Report 2004/05

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5589
Author
Middleton, G.R.
Munro, B.D.
Date
April 2005
Edition
37723
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
on Wood Density of Saskatchewan White Spruce - Implications for Silvicultural Practices
Author
Middleton, G.R.
Munro, B.D.
Date
April 2005
Edition
37723
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Treatment
Silviculture
Saskatchewan
Picea
Growth
Series Number
General Revenue Project No. 3480;3480
W-2146
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A total of 110 white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss) trees were systematically sampled by 30, 40 and 50 cm diameter-at-breast height (DBH) classes from three natural stands in Saskatchewan located near Big River, Candle Lake and Hudson Bay. Mean ages of the tree samples were 120, 110 and 107 years respectively. Based on sample trees, site indices at breast-height age 50 were 18.5, 18.1 and 18.3 respectively. Wood basic relative density at breast height was determined for each sample tree by X-ray densitometry. Mean values for each tree sample were 0.372, 0.369 and 0.361 respectively. ANOVA of basic relative density on DBH class and stand (R2 = 0.32) revealed that differences in mean density between stands were not significant. The effect of DBH class (rate-of-growth) was significant (p < 0.0001). Consequently, mean relative density values were determined for the 30, 40 and 50 cm DBH classes for the three tree samples combined. These were 0.384, 0.368 and 0.349 respectively compared to the species average of 0.354. Pith-to-bark density trends were inversely related to ring-width trends, consistent with expectations for white spruce. Density trends observed in Saskatchewan coincided with those obtained from white spruce trees sampled similarly from three stands in northeastern British Columbia and three stands in north central Alberta. In the BC study trends in breast-height wood density were reflected in similar and more significant trends in bending modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE), MOE in compression, and ultimate compression strength (UCS) of small clear specimens. The combined results of the two previous studies demonstrated robustly that for stands of similar age and site index, wood density and related structural wood properties of white spruce are influenced primarily by rate-of-growth. Pooled results for the three Saskatchewan stands confirmed this wood density/growth-rate relationship. Considered within each stand, wood density generally declined significantly (a = 0.05) as diameter class increased. A notable exception occurred at Candle Lake. In that stand, although not significantly different, the mean wood density in the 30 cm DBH class was slightly lower than that of the 40 cm class. On review, a similar lack of significant difference in mean density occurred between the 30 and 40 cm DBH classes in two previous samples, one in BC and one in Alberta, but in those stands the density hierarchy remained as expected. One plausible explanation is a deleterious effect of greater competition combined with low site index. The lower than expected density values for small diameter trees coincided with the three lowest site indices of the nine samples. Wood density of Saskatchewan white spruce was higher than that observed in BC and Alberta with even the 50 cm DBH class showing no significant difference from the species average. This suggests that faster growth can be pursued in Saskatchewan before encountering a detrimental reduction in average wood density. Pronounced increases in annual growth rate that occurred after cambial age twenty in the 40 cm and 50 cm trees at the Big River stand coincided with pronounced declines in breast-height wood density. This was consistent with results observed in two of the previous six samples studied, and strengthens evidence that natural events that result in release will reduce white spruce wood density. Silvicultural interventions that result in similar release can be expected to have a similar effect.
Picea glauca - Density - Saskatchewan
Picea glauca - Growth
Silviculture
Growth - Influence of silvicultural treatment
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Evaluation of the Donaren 870 H silvicultural mounder in Saskatchewan

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40495
Author
Bulley, Brian
Date
January 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bulley, Brian
Date
January 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Sites
Site preparation
Shear
Saskatchewan
Productivity
Preparation
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 1, No. 38
Language
English
Abstract
In 1999, FERIC cooperated with the Forest Ecosystem Branch, Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management (SERM) in an assessment of the Donaren 870 H silvicultural mounder operating on two site types in Saskatchewan. Areas shear bladed and those not shear bladed were studied to compare the quality and quantity of mounds produced.
Site preparation
Mechanical method
Mounding
Shear blading
Productivity
Donaren 870H mounder
Saskatchewan
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Fuel consumption for ground-based harvesting systems in western Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40590
Author
Sambo, Stephanie
Date
July 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Sambo, Stephanie
Date
July 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Systems
Saskatchewan
Harvesting
British Columbia
Analysis
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 29
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) interviewed member companies and contractors to quantify fuel usage rates associated with ground-based harvesting, from planning to free growing. Fuel consumption rates for each harvesting system were converted to a common fuel equivalency, litres of diesel equivalent (L d.e.), megajoules of energy (MJ), and grams (g) of greenhouse gas emissions per cubic metre harvested. Finally, the weighted average volume of fuel required for one cubic metre was determined. The report also includes suggestions to reduce fuel consumption rates and greenhouse gas emissions from ground-based harvesting systems.
Fuel consumption
Harvesting systems
Life cycle analysis
Ground-based harvesting
British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
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Furniture and interior finish opportunities for select underutilized wood species - Saskatchewan and British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5587
Author
Fell, David
Caldecott, T.
Date
April 2004
Edition
37716
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Furniture and Interior Finish Opportunities for Select Underutilized Wood Species - Saskatchewan
Author
Fell, David
Caldecott, T.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment.
Saskatchewan Forest Centre.
Date
April 2004
Edition
37716
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
68 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Saskatchewan
Markets
Furniture
British Columbia
Series Number
3794
W-2097
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The primary objectives of this study are to demonstrate the feasibility of: 1. Producing high quality value-added products from lesser-used species through prototyping; and 2. Marketing high quality value-added products from lesser-used species through consumer research on the prototypes at home shows. In year one of the project, fibre was sourced and prototype products designed and produced. This was achieved through partnering with eleven companies from the primary and value-added wood industries in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Having carried out these prototyping exercises, there are two main areas to assess after the first year of the project. These are: (1) the appropriateness of the underutilized fibre for use in furniture and interior finish products, and (2) the infrastructure that exists to take the fibre in log form through to market-ready interior finish or furniture products. Year two of this project sought to determine the consumer response to the products made of under-utilized species from Saskatchewan and British Columbia. The method by which this was accomplished involved three stages: 1) creating cabinet, flooring and chair samples from each of the select species (Broadleaf Maple, Western Hemlock and Western Larch from BC and Trembling Aspen, Tamarack and White Birch from Saskatchewan); 2) displaying the samples and collecting responses in Santa Clara, Denver, Toronto and Vancouver; and 3) analyzing the results. The wood samples were displayed and the data was collected at four home shows in Santa Clara, Denver, Toronto and Vancouver. A booth was created to display the wood products from one province at a time and consumers were asked to share their opinions by filling out a five minute survey. The survey consisted of four sections asking respondents to: choose the most attractive floor and cabinet sample within each species displayed; choose the overall most attractive door and floor among all species displayed; rate the general attractiveness of each species; and finally, provide specific demographic information. A total of 1141 surveys were collected at the four shows. Vertical grain larch and darker birch products emerged as the most attractive species from both provinces in both cabinet and floor applications. Differences existed between the cities, such that respondents in Denver responded almost as positively to light and dark birch floors. The largest demographic difference existed between urban and rural populations, in which some samples (knotty samples) became more attractive to respondents if they lived farther from an urban centre, while others (lighter coloured and flat sawn samples) became less attractive. The greatest obstacle to overcome for underutilized species will be exposure and familiarity. While home show attendees exhibited significant interest in these products, they were totally unfamiliar with the majority of species and somewhat leery of their performance compared to traditional species.
Furniture - Markets - British Columbia
Furniture - Markets - Saskatchewan
Finishes
Documents
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Furniture and interior finish opportunities for select underutilized wood species - Saskatchewan and British Columbia. Year 1 report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37645
Author
Fell, David
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Opportunities for Select Underutilized Wood Species - Saskatchewan and British Columbia Year 1 Report
Author
Fell, David
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
40 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
British Columbia
Saskatchewan
Markets
Furniture
Series Number
3794
PD2003-0109 International Marketing Program
W-1943
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The primary objectives of this study are to demonstrate the feasibility of: 1. Producing high quality value-added products from lesser-used species through prototyping; and 2. Marketing high quality value-added products from lesser-used species through consumer research on the prototypes at home shows. In year one of the project, fibre was sourced and prototype products designed and produced. This was achieved through partnering with eleven companies from the primary and value-added wood industries in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Having carried out these prototyping exercises, there are two main areas to assess after the first year of the project. These are: (1) the appropriateness of the underutilized fibre for use in furniture and interior finish products, and (2) the infrastructure that exists to take the fibre in log form through to market-ready interior finish or furniture products. All six species used in this study were well received by the companies that utilized them in the production of prototypes. All species machined well and were deemed to have appropriate properties for the products for which they were used . In situations where a partner company had never used a certain species, all companies indicated a willingness to use the species in the future, given adequate supply and market demand. Most of the challenges encountered in year one of this project were with respect to gaps in the infrastructure in place. Infrastructure varies among provinces, species, products, and all combinations thereof. However, some general observations can be made that cover most industry scenarios. For interior finish and furniture manufacturers, there seem to exist two extremes with respect to the use of underutilized domestic species: 1. Many furniture and interior finish producers in Western Canada are completely detached from the domestic resource. This is due to the lack of availability of suitable domestic lumber and veneers for their manufacturing needs. In addition, risk aversion with respect to market demand prevents some from using new species. 2. Other manufactures of interior finish have taken the approach of integrating back to the resource by sourcing logs, sawing lumber, and drying lumber, all in addition to their core business of designing, manufacturing, and marketing finished products. Many of these companies report difficulties sourcing logs. In addition, the vertically integrated business model of sourcing logs to marketing consumer products is challenging for smaller companies to excel at. To foster growth in the use of domestic underutilized species in the value-added sector the following infrastructure challenges must be addressed with respect to fibre conversion.
Access to logs is reportedly difficult for smaller producers who specialize in sawing for the value-added sector.
The specialty sawmilling industry that focuses on the recovery of visual grades, grain orientation, and colour sorts has not fully developed in Western Canada.
Drying capacity appropriate for lumber destined to the value-added industry is limited to non-existent in some regions.
Veneers are not available in many underutilized species, stalling the potential growth in lumber demand as the two products are used together.
Prospective demand for specialty lumber and veneers from underutilized species must be clearly documented to warrant investment by specialty sawmills. Key recommendations and industry needs identified after the first year of this study include: 1. Technical transfer to specialty sawmills - These companies need the background, technical information, and tools to produce lumber of underutilized species for value-added markets. Specialty mills must be introduced to the possible grades and sorts that can be produced for this type of lumber, as well the type of sawing optimization that will allow them to recover these grades. 2. Drying facilities – Drying capacity is necessary for lumber manufacturers who wish to be in the value-added market. However, many of these mills are very small and cannot justify the expense of their own kilns. The model of centralized drying operations partnering with multiple small sawmills must be further explored and developed. 3. Marketing and distribution – One of the requirements of the value-added industry is consistent supply. Again, a collection of small sawmills would be better positioned to provide continuous supply than single sawmills. Further, the value-added industry must effectively market their products of underutilized species if they are to provide sufficient demand for specialty sawmills. 4. Veneer availability – Veneers are necessary to establish a new species in the value-added sector as they are used with lumber. Veneer production can be outsourced, as veneers are economical to ship. However, companies wishing to sell a new species of lumber must ensure veneers are an option for their potential customers. 5. Market research – The last component needed is market research indicating to specialty sawmills and value-added producers that there is sufficient market potential for lumber and finished products made of underutilized domestic species. This will be addressed in year two of this project. In year two of this study, the prototypes that have been produced will be the subject of market research on the consumer acceptance of products made underutilized domestic species. Data will be collected at six home shows; two in Canada and four in the United States. Combinations of species, grades, and product formats that have the best market prospects will be identified.
Furniture - Markets - British Columbia
Furniture - Markets - Saskatchewan
Finishes
Documents
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Introduction of the Silvana Selective/Ford Versatile Cleaning Machine to Alberta

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39957
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
March 1993
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
March 1993
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Tractors
Thinning
Stands
Saskatchewan
Productivity
Plantations
Costs
Canada
British Columbia
Alberta
Series Number
FO Technical Note ; Silviculture FNS 52
Language
English
Abstract
Precommercial thinning
CLEANING
PLANTATIONS
Stand tending
Mechanical method
Brush cutters
Articulated tractors
Machine evaluation
PRODUCTIVITY
COSTS
Silvana selective cleaning machine
Ford versatile tractor
Western Canada
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ALBERTA
SASKATCHEWAN
Documents
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23 records – page 1 of 3.