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Basic wood properties of second-growth sitka spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5534
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
von Schilling, B.
Sen, P.
Date
January 1993
Edition
37459
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
von Schilling, B.
Sen, P.
Contributor
British Columbia. Ministry of Forests. Queen Charlotte Forest District.
Date
January 1993
Edition
37459
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
38 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Second growth
Picea
Physical properties
Mechanical properties
Growth
Series Number
W-1446
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The basic wood properties of 45-year-old second-growth sitka spruce were examined to determine if rapid growth produces poor wood quality. Five dominant and codominant trees were sampled from each of four stands with stocking densities of 520, 640, 1080, and 1520 stems/ha. Stem size, extent of live crown, yearly wood relative density trends, and longitudinal shrinkage were measured.
Picea sitchensis - Mechanical properties
Picea sitchensis - Physical properties
Second growth
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Basic wood properties of second-growth western hemlock

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5879
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Munro, B.D.
Gordon, J.R.
Date
March 1998
Edition
41165
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
BASIC WOOD PROPERTIES OF SECOND-GROWTH WESTERN HEMLOCK by L.A. Jozsa, B.D. Munro and J.R
Author
Jozsa, Les A.
Munro, B.D.
Gordon, J.R.
Date
March 1998
Edition
41165
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
51 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Tsuga Heterophylla
Tsuga
Second growth
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Physical properties
Growth
Series Number
Special Publication ; SP-38
W-1444
Location
Victoria, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This report describes some of the background and results of work done to date on second-growth western hemlock basic wood properties at Forintek Canada Corp. The B.C. Ministry of Forests (BCMOF) Research Branch, UBC Forestry Faculty and PAPRICAN were the other cooperating agencies on this project and they investigated live crown/tree growth relationships, strength properties of small clears, and pulping properties, respectively. Properties that were assessed by Forintek, both within and between trees include: relative density of wood, shrinkage, moisture content and relative proportion of heartwood-sapwood, bark thickness, content and distribution of compression wood, incidence and degree of spiral grain, incidence and severity of brown stain, and strength properties of small cleear bending samples. Naturally grown 90-year-old western hemlock stands represent much of the emerging timber supply in the B.C. coastal forest region. Information characterizing the commercial quality of this resource is needed now to support processing and marketing decisions and for product promotion. In addition, the BCMOF and industry members are making stand management decisions today which will determine the future quality of western hemlock. We can reduce the risk of making wrong investment decisions by providing information on how different growing conditions (e.g., biogeoclimatic zone, site, stand density, thinning) affect second-growth wood quality.
Second growth
Tsuga heterophylla - Physical properties
Growth - Influence on quality
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Bending strength and stiffness of log stringers for bridges on forest roads: tests of second-growth Douglas-fir and western hemlock logs

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5843
Author
Bennett, Douglas M.
Modesto, R.
Ewart, Jim
Jokai, Rob
Parker, Seamus
Clark, Marv
Date
January 2005
Edition
40689
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Bennett, Douglas M.
Modesto, R.
Ewart, Jim
Jokai, Rob
Parker, Seamus
Clark, Marv
Date
January 2005
Edition
40689
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation & Infrastructure
Subject
Test methods
Mechanical properties
Second growth
Ruptures
Procedures
Logs
Sample
Growth
Design
British Columbia
Bending
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 5, No. 42
Language
English
Abstract
In order to provide bridge designers with better information, International Forest Products Limited (Interfor) asked the Forest Engineering Resarach Institute of Canada (FERIC) to evaluate the bending strength and stiffness of log stringers used for constructing bridges on forest roads in coastal British Columbia. Given the lack of definitive standards for testing this material, FERIC developed a field-based test procedure and designed a test facility for destructive testing of full-size, whole-log stringers obtained from second-growth stands. Sixteen coastal Douglas-fir and twelve western hemlock logs were tested in 2003. This report describes the test procedure and methods of analysis, presents the log bending strength and stiffness results, and makes recommendations regarding future testing.
Bridge design
Log stringers
Bending strength
Modulus of rupture
Modulus of elasticity
Test procedure
Second-growth logs
Douglas fir
Western hemlock
Coastal British Columbia
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Bunch yarding with radio-controlled chokers in coastal British Columbia second-growth timber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43492
Author
MacDonald, A.J.
Date
1990
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
MacDonald, A.J.
Date
1990
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Second growth
Series Number
FO Special Report
Language
English
Abstract
Two Madill 044 Yarding cranes were monitored over a three-week period in 1989 in a coastal British Columbia stand were chokers were used for yarding mechanically felled and bunched second-growth timber. Productivity, costs and profitability of the choker system were determined and compared to using grapple systems on the same yarding cranes.
Second-growth forests
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Commercial thinning a coastal second-growth forest with a Timberjack cut-to-length system

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub188
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
January 1996
Edition
36613
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
January 1996
Edition
36613
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Timberjack
Thinning
Systems
Soil disturbance
Soil
Softwoods
Second growth forests
Second growth
Productivity
Sample
Harvesting
Harvesters
Growth
British Columbia
Series Number
Technical Note ; TN-000235
Language
English
Abstract
Pacific Forest Products Limited began commercially thinning Douglas-fir dominated second-growth forest on southeastern Vancouver Island with mechanized shortwood systems in 1992. In the summer of 1994, FERIC monitored a thinning operation near Cowichan Lake to determine productivities, costs and impacts to sites and residual stands. The thinning treatment was carried out with a Timberjack 1270 harvester and a Timberjack 910 forwarder.
Commercial thinning
Softwoods
DOUGLAS-FIR
Second-growth forests
Harvesting
Cut-to-length systems
SOIL DISTURBANCE
Machine evaluation
Productivity
FMG TIMBERJACK 1270 SINGLE-GRIP HARVESTER
FMG TIMBERJACK 910 FORWARDER
Coastal British Columbia
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Comparison of three harvesting systems in a Coastal British Columbia second-growth stand

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43216
Author
Peterson, J.T.
Peterson, S.
Date
1986
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Peterson, J.T.
Peterson, S.
Date
1986
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
50 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Harvesting
Second growth
Language
English
Abstract
The coastal B.C. logging industry is striving to lower its costs in order to continue to compete in the world marketplace. This report documents one company's trials of three different logging systems carried out during 1985. Production and costs were monitored, evaluated, and reported for the falling, skidding, yarding, processing and loading phases. The study area was located in a second-growth stand of timber on Vancouver Island, B.C. The logging system found to be most efficient and cost-effective was bunch skidding with landing processing, combined with close supervision.
Second-growth forests
Harvesting systems
FELLING
CABLE LOGGING
PROCESSING
LOADING
Comparison
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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A decision support model for predicting net revenue of harvesting coastal second-growth forests

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36811
Author
Pavel, Mihai
Andersson, Björn
Young, G.G.
Date
1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
COASTAL SECOND-GROWTH FORESTS Mihai Pavel, M.F. Bjorn Andersson, M.Sc.FE., P.Eng. G. Glen Young
Author
Pavel, Mihai
Andersson, Björn
Young, G.G.
Date
1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Value added
Systems
Simulation
Second growth forests
Second growth
Productivity
Logs
Harvesting
Growth
Costs
British Columbia
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR-000126
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC and the Faculty of Forestry of the University of British Columbia (UBC) developed a computer model, for use at the cutblock level, to predict the net revenue of coastal second-growth stands that are to be clear-cut or partial cut. Cruise data and company sort descriptions are used to predict volume by sort and timber value. Productivity and cost data from within the model, or as defined by the user, determine the total harvesting costs for an operation. Net revenue is obtained by subtracting the harvesting cost from the timber value. At two harvesting sites near Powell River, B.C., the predicted total volumes and timber values were within 5% and 3% of scaled volumes and actual values, respectively.
Harvesting
Second-growth forests
Economic aspects
Predicted log value
Productivity
Costs
Decision support systems
Models and simulation
Coastal British Columbia
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Effect of falling techniques on grapply yarding second-growth timber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43264
Author
Peterson, J.T.
Date
1987
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Peterson, J.T.
Date
1987
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Second growth
Series Number
Technical Notes
Language
English
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare grapple yarding feller-director bunched wood with feller-director unbunched wood. The study was done at Weyerhaeuser Forest Products Company's vail operations, near Olympia, Washington. FERIC monitored a Washington 108 grapple yarder in three areas over a period of 16 days. Costs in the three areas ranged from a low of $1.65/m**3 to a high of $3.11 m**3. The bunched-wood area produced 10% more trees per productive machine hour and 36% more trees per turn than the adjacent unbunched area.
Second-growth forests
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Evaluation of a Caterpillar 535B grapple skidder in a second-growth forest in coastal British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40709
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Date
June 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Date
June 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Skidding
Skidders
Second growth
Productivity
Sample
Harvesting
Growth
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 6, No. 7
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) undertook a study to investigate the feasibility of using a grapple skidder to complement a loader-forwarding operation in a second-growth cutblock on northern Vancouver Island. This report presents productivity and cost results of the skidding operation, identifies the factors that influence performance of the grapple skidder, and describes the soil disturbance resulting from skidding.
Caterpillar 535B grapple skidder
Extraction
Harvesting
Skidding
Loader-forwarding
Second growth
Productivity
Costs
Coastal British Columbia
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Evaluation of a Timberjack 660D grapple skidder working on moderately steep slopes in coastal British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40636
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Date
July 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Date
July 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Timberjack
Steep slopes
Skidding
Skidders
Second growth
Productivity
Harvesting
Growth
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 21
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) undertook a study with TimberWest Forest Corporation Ltd., to investigate the feasilbility of using a rubber-tired grapple skidder to complement a loader-forwarding operation on moderately steep slopes in second-growth forests in coastal British Columbia. This report presents the productivity and cost of the skidding operation, identifies the factors that influence performance of the grapple skidder, and describes the soil disturbance resulting from skidding.
Timberjack 660D grapple skidder
Harvesting
Skidding
Loader-forwarding
Productivity
Costs
British Columbia
Second growth
Steep slopes
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50 records – page 1 of 5.