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Design solutions for minimizing flanking of sound in wood buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39093
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2008
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Sound transmission
Design
Series Number
General Revenue Report Project No. 5324
5324
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Design
Sound
Documents
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Design solutions for minimizing flanking of sound in wood buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39209
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Sound transmission
Design
Building construction
Series Number
General Revenue
5324
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Building construction - Design
Sound
Documents
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Design solutions for minimizing flanking of sound in wood buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39033
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Series Number
General Revenue
5324
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Sound Transmission
Wood Buildings
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5951
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
March 2000
Edition
41931
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2000
Edition
41931
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
21 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2
E-3397
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood-frame assemblies
Fire-resistance
Sound-Transmission
Abstract
Systèmes de construction
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5959
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
March 2001
Edition
42019
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2001
Edition
42019
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2
E-3523
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Sound-transmission-class (STC) and fire-resistance (FR) ratings for many of the generic construction assemblies traditionally used in construction of Canadian housing and small buildings have been published in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) since 1950. While some of those ratings were updated over the intervening years, many of them had not been revised since 1965. Therefore, in 1992 the Canadian Commission for Building and Fire Codes decided to delete from the 1995 edition of the NBCC, every STC and FR ratings that could not be supported by contemporary data. Canadian architects, fire-protection engineers and building officials make extensive use of the STC and FR ratings in the NBCC when designing and approving housing and small buildings in Canada. The STC ratings are also used extensively in the design of engineered structures. Wood-frame assemblies, more than any other, are designed and constructed in accordance with the STC and FR ratings listed in the NBCC. Therefore, it was crucial for the wood industry to generate the necessary data to retain STC and FR ratings for wood-frame assemblies. No single organisation in Canada could afford to bear the costs associated with a testing program to determine STC and FR ratings for all assemblies commonly used in Canadian housing and small buildings. Therefore, a partnership of affected industries and governmental organisations was created, and the National Research Council Canada (NRC), in collaboration with those partners, commenced a research program to quantify STC and FR ratings for generic building assemblies protected by gypsum board. Forintek Canada Corp., in conjunction with the Canadian Wood Council, and a number of North American manufacturers of engineered wood products, is participating in that program on behalf of Canada’s wood products industry. This report describes progress achieved in that research program between April 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001. A paper entitled “Observations on fire-endurance tests of wood-frame assemblies protected by gypsum board” was presented at the 4th International Wood & Fire Safety Conference in ÒrbskJ Pleso, Slovak Republic. A paper entitled “Sound-transmission-class and fire-resistance ratings for wood-frame floors” was published in Fire and Materials. A 26-page paper entitled “Thoughts and observations on fire-endurance tests of wood-frame assemblies protected by gypsum board” was submitted for publication in Fire and Materials. The second meeting of the steering committee for the collaborative research project to assess fire and acoustical performances of floor assemblies was held on September 12, 2000. When completed, the total value of the work carried out for this part of the overall collaborative testing program will be about $2,200,000. NRC is contributing 40%. The wood industry is contributing about 20%. There are no differences in the fire endurance times of floor assemblies constructed with nominal 2x8’s, compared to those for assemblies constructed with nominal 2x10’s, provided all other construction details are identical and applied structural loads are proportionally the same. The addition of 25-mm thick gypsum-concrete toppings (1957 kg/m3) on wood-frame floors does not reduce the fire endurance of the floor. There are no differences in the fire endurance times of wood-frame floor assemblies having ceilings constructed with two layers of gypsum board, irrespective of whether the gypsum board is fastened directly to the bottom of the joists or attached to the bottom of the joists using resilient channels. Attempts to design wood-joist floor assemblies having 45-min fire-resistance-ratings were unsuccessful when there was no insulation between the joists and the ceiling consisted of a single layer of gypsum board. Similarly, attempts to design wood-joist floor assemblies having 1-hr fire-resistance ratings failed when the ceiling consisted of only one layer of gypsum board and rock-fibre insulation was placed between the joists. The third meeting of the steering committee for the Phase-II collaborative research project to assess flanking sound transmission in multifamily dwellings was held on June 13, 2000. The fourth meeting was held at USG’s Research and Technology Center on October 12 and 13, 2000. When acoustical performance is considered, and particularly impact-noise-transmission, wood-frame construction has an almost insurmountable advantage over heavy concrete. A meeting of the steering committee for the collaborative research project to assess fire and acoustical performances of wall assemblies was held on September 13, 2000. The results of fire tests on wood-frame walls were reported in two Internal Reports published by NRC. The first draft of a NRC Internal Report on the acoustical testing carried out for this project has been written. A representative of Forintek attended meetings of the AF&PA Subcommittee on Fire Performance of Wood, and the AF&PA Technical Committee from August 8 to 10, 2000. AF&PA funded a series of fire endurance tests on wood-frame walls. By selecting only the strongest studs and using specially selected Type X gypsum board, they were able to achieve greater fire resistance ratings for wood-stud walls than were observed in the collaborative project described in this report. This research project will continue in 2001/2002. Forintek will continue to write papers for presentation at conferences, seminars and workshops and for publication in journals and other written media in order to get the message out about this project and the acoustical and fire performance of wood-frame construction. One of the major points that will be made in those papers is that wood-frame construction provides superior sound insulation, compared to concrete assemblies, and that it is less expensive to construct acoustically superior wood-frame assemblies than steel-frame ones. In addition, Forintek will work with CMHC and NRC to develop a “best-practice” guide describing construction details for party-walls separating adjacent units in multifamily dwellings.
Wood-frame assemblies
Sound-transmission-class ratings
Fire-resistance
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5970
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
March 2002
Edition
42101
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
for this purpose. �Fire-resistance and Sound-transmission-class Ratings for Generic Wood-frame Assemblies iii
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2002
Edition
42101
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2
E-3628
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Sound-transmission-class (STC) and fire-resistance (FR) ratings for many of the generic construction assemblies traditionally used in construction of Canadian housing and small buildings have been published in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) since 1950. While some of those ratings were updated over the intervening years, many of them had not been revised since 1965. Therefore, in 1992 the Canadian Commission for Building and Fire Codes decided to delete from the 1995 edition of the NBCC, all STC and FR ratings that could not be supported by contemporary data. Architects, fire-protection engineers and building officials make extensive use of the STC and FR ratings in the NBCC when designing and approving housing and small buildings in Canada. The STC ratings are also used extensively in the design of larger engineered structures. Wood-frame assemblies more than any other, are designed and constructed in accordance with the STC and FR ratings listed in the NBCC. Therefore, it was crucial for the wood industry to generate the necessary data to retain STC and FR ratings for wood-frame assemblies in the building code. No single organisation in Canada could afford to bear the costs associated with a testing program to determine STC and FR ratings for all assemblies commonly used in Canadian housing and small buildings. Therefore, a partnership of affected industries and governmental organisations was created, and the National Research Council Canada (NRC), in collaboration with those partners, commenced a research program to quantify STC and FR ratings for generic building assemblies protected by gypsum board. Forintek Canada Corp., in conjunction with the Canadian Wood Council and a number of North American manufacturers of engineered wood products, is participating in that program on behalf of Canada’s wood products industry. This report describes progress achieved in that research program between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. It also includes, in tabular form, a summary of all fire tests and all sound-transmission tests (both STC and IIC) carried out on wood-frame floor assemblies. A web page with all pertinent information about for the collaborative research project to assess fire and acoustical performances of floor assemblies (FLOORS-2) can be found at: www.nrc.ca/ir/ie/acoustics/floors2/priv/ A web page with all pertinent information about the collaborative research project to assess flanking sound transmission in multifamily dwellings (FLANKING-2) can be found at: www.nrc.ca/irc/ie/flanking A number of technology-transfer activities were carried out between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002, including the following:
Forintek researchers gave two presentations entitled “Fire Safety in Wood-frame Housing” at the Canadian Wood Council Wood Solutions Fair in Edmonton.
Forintek researchers gave a presentation entitled “Fire Safety and Acoustical Design of Wood-frame Buildings” at woodWORKS! Wood-design Conferences in Vancouver and Victoria.
A paper by Forintek researchers entitled “Thoughts and observations on fire-endurance tests of wood-frame assemblies protected by gypsum board” was accepted for publication in Fire and Materials.
Forintek researchers wrote three TECHNOTES: § Fire performance of engineered wood products – facts & fallacies. § Design of wood-frame floor assemblies for fire resistance and noise insulation. § Noise transmission in wood-frame apartment buildings – solutions to flanking.
A paper entitled “Flanking Sound Transmission in Wood-frame Construction” by researchers at NRC was published in Canadian Acoustics/Acoustique canadienne.
NRC published an Internal Report entitled “Impact Sound Measurement on Floors Covered with Small Patches of Resilient Materials or Floating Assemblies”.
NRC published an Internal Report entitled “Sound Insulation of Load Bearing Shear Resistant Wood and Steel Stud Walls”. This research project will be continued in 2002/2003. The ultimate completion date for the project is March 31, 2004 (unchanged).
Wood-frame assemblies
Sound-transmission-class ratings
Fire-resistance
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies : 2002-2003 progress

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5976
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
March 2003
Edition
42192
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
. �Fire-resistance and Sound-transmission-class Ratings for Generic Wood-frame Assemblies - 2002-2003
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2003
Edition
42192
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2
E-3772
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Even though sound-transmission-class (STC) and fire-resistance (FR) ratings for generic assemblies traditionally used in construction of Canadian housing and small buildings had been published in every edition of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) since 1950, in 1992 the Canadian Commission for Building and Fire Codes (CCBFC) decided to delete from the 1995 edition of the NBCC, all STC and FR ratings that could not be supported by contemporary data. Architects, fire-protection engineers and building officials make extensive use of the STC and FR ratings in the NBCC when designing and approving housing and small buildings in Canada. The STC ratings are also used extensively in the design of larger engineered structures. Wood-frame assemblies more than any other, are designed and constructed in accordance with the STC and FR ratings listed in the NBCC. Therefore, it was crucial for the wood industry to generate the necessary data to retain STC and FR ratings for wood-frame assemblies in the building code. No single organisation in Canada could afford to bear the costs associated with a testing program to determine STC and FR ratings for all assemblies commonly used in Canadian housing and small buildings. Therefore, in 1992 a partnership of affected industries and governmental organisations was created, and the National Research Council Canada (NRC), in collaboration with those partners, commenced a research program to quantify STC and FR ratings for generic building assemblies protected by gypsum board. Forintek Canada Corp., in conjunction with the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) and a number of North American manufacturers of engineered wood products, is participating in that program on behalf of Canada’s wood products industry. This report describes progress achieved in that research program between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. At the same time that NRC was carrying out the collaborative program to quantify STC and FR ratings for generic building assemblies, they, in collaboration with many of those same partners including Forintek Canada Corp., carried out a separate program to identify construction designs which minimise flanking paths for noise at the connections between floor assemblies and partywalls separating adjoining units in wood-frame apartment buildings. Revisions to Table A-9.10.3.1.B. Fire and Sound Resistance of Floors, Ceilings and Roofs in the NBCC and the accompanying Appendix Note A-9.10.3.1 were published on the CCBFC website. The revisions include FR ratings for 80 wood-frame floor/ceiling assemblies, and STC and impact-insulation-class (IIC) ratings for 348 wood-frame floor/ceiling assemblies. The table includes assemblies constructed with timber joists, wood I-joists and metal-plate-connected parallel-chord wood trusses. Prior to the revisions, Table A-9.10.3.1.B provided ratings for just eighteen wood-frame floor/ceiling assemblies. A number of technology-transfer activities were carried out between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003: q A paper by L. Richardson entitled “Thoughts and Observations on Fire-endurance Tests of Wood-frame Assemblies Protected by Gypsum Board” was published in Fire and Mater. q L. Richardson gave a presentation entitled “Fire Safety and Acoustical Design of Wood-frame Buildings” at the Canadian Wood Council Wood Solutions Fair in Ottawa. q L. Richardson gave a presentation entitled “Fire Safety and Acoustical Design of Wood-frame Buildings” at the annual meeting of the Building Officials Association of British Columbia in Burnaby. q L. Richardson gave a presentation entitled “Update: Fire and Acoustics Research, Codes and Standards Issues” at the Structural Board Association’s World OSB Symposium in Chicago. q L. Richardson gave a presentation entitled “Composite Structural Wood Products” to staff at the NRC in Ottawa. q Forintek published a twelve-page full-colour booklet entitled “Wood-frame Construction, Fire Resistance and Sound Transmission”. q Forintek updated and republished a four-page full-colour booklet entitled “Fire Safety - A Wood-frame Building Performance Fact Sheet”. NRC researchers presented a series of one-day Building Science Insight Seminars entitled “Sound Isolation and Fire Containment Details that Work” in cities across Canada. In fulfillment of a collaborative research agreement with Forintek, National Research Council Canada Final Report A1080.4 entitled “Flanking Transmission in Multi-Family Dwellings: Phase II” was submitted to Forintek. The report describes the results of research on the flanking of noise in wood-framed construction due to continuous structural elements that pass under a partition wall between two horizontally separated dwellings in multi-storey apartment buildings. A senior NRC acoustician utilising acoustical data generated through this research project and regression-analysis approaches developed “relatively simple” mathematical expressions that predict sound transmission (STC and IIC) through floor/ceiling assemblies. L. Richardson attended meetings of the American Wood Council (AWC) Subcommittee on Fire Performance of Wood, and the AWC Technical Committee. Many issues related to the fire-resistance of wood-frame buildings were discussed: two of the more important being the fire resistance of floor assemblies without fire protective ceiling membranes attached to the bottom of the floor joists and the risk to firefighters during fires in “lightweight” wood-frame buildings. This research project will be continued in 2003/2004. The ultimate completion date for the project is March 31, 2004 (unchanged).
Wood-frame assemblies
Sound-transmission-class ratings
Fire-resistance
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies : final progress report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5979
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
March 2004
Edition
42243
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
. �Fire-resistance and Sound-transmission-class Ratings for Generic Wood-frame Assemblies - Final Progress
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2004
Edition
42243
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
31 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Even though fire-resistance (FR) ratings for generic assemblies traditionally used in construction of Canadian housing and small buildings had been published in every edition of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) since 1950, and in the later years, sound-transmission-class (STC) ratings were also listed for each assembly, in 1992 the Canadian Commission for Building and Fire Codes (CCBFC) decided to delete from the 1995 edition of the NBCC, all STC and FR ratings that could not be supported by contemporary data. Architects, fire-protection engineers and building officials make extensive use of the STC and FR ratings in the NBCC when designing and approving housing and small buildings in Canada. The STC ratings are also used extensively in the design of larger engineered structures. Wood-frame assemblies more than any other, are designed and constructed in accordance with the STC and FR ratings listed in the NBCC. Therefore, it was crucial for the wood industry to generate the necessary data to retain STC and FR ratings for wood-frame assemblies in the building code. In 1992 a partnership of affected industries and governmental organisations was created, and the National Research Council Canada (NRC), in collaboration with those partners, commenced a research program to quantify STC and FR ratings for generic building assemblies protected by gypsum board. Forintek Canada Corp., in conjunction with the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) and a number of North American manufacturers of engineered wood products, participated in that program on behalf of Canada’s wood products industry. At the same time that NRC was carrying out the collaborative program to quantify STC and FR ratings for generic building assemblies, they, in collaboration with many of those same partners including Forintek Canada Corp., carried out a separate program to identify construction designs which minimise flanking paths for noise at the connections between floor assemblies and partywalls separating adjoining units in wood-frame apartment buildings. All empirical studies for this project were completed by March 31, 2004. Writing, reviewing and publishing of the final reports by the researchers at NRC will require an additional four to six months to complete. Nevertheless, even though some of the deliverables including the final NRC reports for the collaborative Floors-II and Phase-III Flanking projects and the best-practice design guide for design of wood-frame structures with adequate noise insulation will not be submitted to Forintek until sometime later in the year, and there are additional revisions to Table A-9.10.3.1.B. Fire and Sound Resistance of Floors, Ceilings and Roofs in the NBCC to be formulated and shepherded through the code approval process, this project ended on March 31, 2004. Forintek’s participation in reviewing of NRC’s final reports and in any subsequent technology transfer activities will be carried out under new, short-term projects. Forintek will continue to write papers for presentation at conferences, seminars and workshops and for publication in journals and other written media in order to get the message out about this project and the acoustical and fire performances of wood-frame construction. However, those activities too will be conducted under new projects. If this research had not been carried out, only twelve designs for wood-frame walls would have been presented in Table A-9.10.3.1.A. Fire and Sound Resistance of Walls of the NBCC and there would have been only eighteen wood-frame floor ceiling assemblies in Table A-9.10.3.1.B. Fire and Sound Resistance of Floors, Ceilings and Roofs. Solely because of this research project, there are now 10½ pages of designs for wood-frame walls in Table A-9.10.3.1.A., 36 pages of designs for wood-frame floor-ceiling assemblies in Table A-9.10.3.1.B., and there will be at least 20 more pages of such information added to Table A-9.10.3.1.B. latter this year. The results of this research project confirmed the appropriateness of NBCC provisions regarding firestopping in double-stud partywalls separating living units in multi-storey multifamily dwellings (Article 3.1.11.2. Fire Stopping in Wall Assemblies), and identified methods to minimize flanking of noises across those partywalls. The results of this research project have permitted hotels chains, including Marriott Hotels, to continue to construct high-quality wood-frame hotels by providing them with solutions to noise transmission problems associated with such structures. The list of published reports and presentations by Forintek’s fire scientists which have resulted from this research project is more than two pages in length. The list of NRC Client Reports and Internal Reports describing the results of the various sound and fire tests is more than three pages in length. In addition, NRC’s fire scientists and acousticians have published many other reports and have given numerous presentations based upon the results of this research. And, there will be many more by both Forintek and NRC researchers. Through their leadership roles on standards writing committees, and backed up with information gained through their participation in this research program, wood-industry fire scientists have been able to make the key arguments that resulted in major changes to critical fire resistance test standards: changes that had been stalled for lack of such supporting data for more than a decade. NRC instrumented every assembly for fire-resistance testing with many more thermocouples and linear deflection transducers than is specified in the test standards. Also, the physical characteristics of all materials used in construction of each assembly were fully documented. The resulting data were invaluable for validation of computer fire models developed by Forintek and NRC researchers, including Forintek’s WALL2D model for predicting the thermal response of walls to standard fire exposures, and the model to predict the fire resistance of wood stud walls developed collaboratively by Forintek and NRC. One of the most important accomplishments of this research program was that it brought together various aspects of building science (fire resistance, structural engineering, and acoustical performance) under one umbrella research program. Previously, researchers would investigate one aspect of building performance at a time, and all too frequently, the solutions that they derived to mitigate one problem, would unknowingly exacerbate others. Also, this research program brought various material interests together to resolve building code issues. For perhaps the first time, representatives for the manufacturers of gypsum board, various insulation products, concrete, light-structural steel and wood products worked together towards a common goal. Modern buildings are not constructed with a single building material. It made economical sense for all the material interests to work together in assessing the performance of buildings constructed with various combinations of their products. It also permitted each to learn about the design and performance problems faced by the other materials interests and of their design solutions for those problems. This has been of critical importance for the wood industry as it tries to protect its traditional markets from competition from steel and concrete products.
Wood-frame assemblies
Sound-transmission-class ratings
Fire-resistance
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies : progress report (April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5681
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
January 1998
Edition
38874
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
January 1998
Edition
38874
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
141 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Research
Building construction
Series Number
CFS Report No. 2
E-3143
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Sound-transmission-class (STC) and fire resistance (FR) ratings for many of the generic construction assemblies traditionally used in construction of Canadian housing and small buildings have been published in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) since 1965. While some of those ratings were updated over the intervening years, many of them had not been revised since 1965. Therefore, in 1992 the Canadian Commission for Building and Fire Codes (CCBFC) decided to delete from the 1995 edition of the NBCC, every STC and FR rating that could not be supported by contemporary data. Canadian architects, fire-protection engineers and building officials make extensive use of the STC and FR ratings in the NBCC when designing and approving housing and small buildings in Canada. The STC ratiings are also used extensively in the design of engineered structures. Wood-frame assemblies, more than any other, are designed and constructed in accordance with the STC and FR ratings listed in the NBCC. Therefore, it was crucial for the wood industry to generate the necessary data to retain STC and FR ratings for commonly-used-wood-frame-assemblies. Because no single organization in Canada could afford to bear the costs associated with a testing program to determine STC and FR ratings for all assemblies commonly used in Canadian housing and small buildings, a partnership of affected industries and governmental organizations was created, and in latter part of 1992, the National Research Council Canada (NRC), in collaboration with those industry and governmental partners, commenced a research program to quantify STC and FR ratings for wood-frame and light-gauge steel-frame building assemblies protected by gypsum-board. Forintek Canada Corp., in conjunction with the Canadian Wood Council (CWC), and a number of North American manufacturers of engineered wood products, is participating in that program on behalf of Canada's wood products industry. This report describes progress achieved in that research program in 1997/98. 1997/98 saw several important milposts in this research program reached. Fire-endurance and sound-transmission tests on floor-ceiling assemblies were completed, reports describing the test results were provided by NRC to each of the industry and governmental partners , and a propasal for revisions to Table A-9.10.3.B Fire and Sound Resistance of Floor, Ceilings and Roofs was drafted and submitted to the CCBFC. In addition, construction details minimizing flanking transmission of sound around firestops in partywalls separating adjacent units in multi-family dwellings were identified, and reports describing those design details were provided by NRC to each of the partners in the "flanking" portion of this research program. A paper by L.R Richardson and M.Batista entitled "Revisiting the Component Additive Method for Light-frame Walls Protected by Gypsum Board " was published in Fire and Materials, 21 (2) 107-114; 1997. The 4 Japan-Canada Housing R&D Workshop was held in Sapporo, Japan , on November 17-18. Forintek provided funding for Dr. M. Sultan to make two presentments on Forintek's behalf at the Workshop. Titles for the two papers presented by Sultan were: "Fire Resistance of Lightweight Frame Floor Assemblies", by M.A Sultan, L.R Richardson and R.A McPhee; and, "Fire Resistance of Lightweight Frame Wall Assemblies",by Sultan, and V.R Kodur, Richardson and McPhee.
Building construction - Fire research
Wood Frame Construction
Sound Transmission
Documents
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Fire-resistance and sound-transmission-class ratings for generic wood-frame assemblies : progress report (April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5945
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Date
March 1999
Edition
41870
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Batista, M.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 1999
Edition
41870
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transmission
Sound transmission
Resistance
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2
E-3272
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood-frame assemblies
Fire-resistance
Sound-Transmission
Documents
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.