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38 records – page 1 of 4.

Adverse skidding using a Tigercat 635E assisted by a T-Winch 10.1

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49844
Author
Strimbu, Vladimir
Boswell, Brian
Date
May 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
these research findings, please contact FPInnovations at info@fpinnovations.ca. 301012179: Steep slopes
Author
Strimbu, Vladimir
Boswell, Brian
Date
May 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Winches
Productivity
Timber
Steep slopes
Safety
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2018 n.23
Language
English
Abstract
This paper presents the productivity and utilization of a system comprising a skidder and an assisting self-propelled winch working on steep terrain. Environmental impact is also assessed for both conventional and winch-assisted skidding.
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Caulk boot versus non-caulk hiking boot: a test of traction on forest ground surfaces

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3388
Author
Nishio, Grant
Date
October 2015
Edition
40059
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Nishio, Grant
Date
October 2015
Edition
40059
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Safety
Steep slopes
Site preparation
Silviculture
Tree planters
Injuries
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2015 n.27
Language
English
Abstract
There is uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of using caulk boots vs. non-caulk hiking boots in silviculture work in the interior of British Columbia. WorkSafeBC regulation 8.23, states “caulked or other equally effective footwear must be worn by workers who are required to walk on logs, poles, pilings or other round timbers”, but does not specifically require caulk boots to be worn on steep slopes. Caulk boots are used almost exclusively by silviculture workers in coastal B.C. but are not commonly used in interior B.C. even though there are many situations where they may provide superior traction. Instead, workers in interior B.C. have a preference for non-caulk hiking boots. Workers will often select their boots based on personal preference rather than on information about the boot’s traction performance. Additional information regarding the differences in the traction of caulk boots and non-caulk hiking boots on various forest ground surfaces would help most workers make better-informed choices. Understanding the differences in traction is one of the most important factors when selecting a work boot in any situation and is especially true in the hazardous ground conditions of forest workers. For this reason, FPInnovations constructed a testing apparatus designed to measure and compare the static coefficient of friction of caulk boots and non-caulk hiking boots on four common types of ground cover surfaces in B.C. forests.
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Commercial thinning on difficult terrain with the Valmet 901C single-grip harvester

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36792
Author
Ewing, Roderick H.
Date
2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
is noted for its variable topography (e.g., steep slopes) and in winter, heavy snow- fall. The winter
Author
Ewing, Roderick H.
Date
2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Valmet
Thinning
Systems
Steep slopes
Pinus
Spruce
Softwoods
Quebec
Productivity
Partial cutting
Harvesters
Black spruce
Balsam
Series Number
Field Note ; Partial Cutting-FN-000028
Language
English
Abstract
Partial cutting systems
Commercial thinning
Steep slopes
SINGLE-GRIP HARVESTER
Productivity
Softwoods
Black spruce
Balsam fir
Quebec
Valmet 901C single-grip harvester
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Commercial thinning with an Urus I-Uni skyline tower yarder in Chile

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36602
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
December 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Hunt, James A.
Date
December 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Thinning
Steep slopes
Yarders
Productivity
Plantations
Pinus
Logs
Costs
Cable logging
Series Number
Field Note ; Silviculture-FN-000081
Language
English
Abstract
Commercial thinning
Steep slopes
Plantations
Radiata pine
Cable logging
Skyline
Productivity
Costs
URUS I-UNI SKYLINE TOWER YARDER
CHILE
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Controlling soil erosion on skid trails and landings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub7963
Author
Partington, Mark
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Partington, Mark
Contributor
Great Lakes St.Lawrence Forest Region of Ontario
Date
June 2008
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Erosion
Skid trails
Soil
Steep slopes
Series Number
Reduce Damage During Partial Cut Operations
Language
English
Abstract
This guide helps forest workers chose preventive measures that will maintain natural drainage patterns, stabilize exposed soils and protect them from erosion and sedimentation during and following harvest operations. Controlling erosion beforehand minimizes sediment movement and is easier than having to deal with transported sediments later on.
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The effect of machine position on stability when operating on steep slopes

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49645
Author
Parker, Seamus
Date
November 2017
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
The Effect of Machine Position on Stability when Operating on Steep Slopes Technical
Author
Parker, Seamus
Date
November 2017
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Steep slopes
Harvesting
Stability
Testing
Feller
Machines
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report; TR 2017 n.60
Language
English
Abstract
An increase in steep-slope harvesting brings the need for a greater understanding of how machines can operate safely and efficiently on steep terrain. This study aimed to investigate the sensitivity of different operating positions for non-tilting and tilting machines, and to propose a methodology for determining safe operating parameters.
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Evaluation of a Timberjack 660D grapple skidder working on moderately steep slopes in coastal British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40636
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Date
July 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Date
July 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Timberjack
Steep slopes
Skidding
Skidders
Second growth
Productivity
Harvesting
Growth
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 4, No. 21
Language
English
Abstract
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) undertook a study with TimberWest Forest Corporation Ltd., to investigate the feasilbility of using a rubber-tired grapple skidder to complement a loader-forwarding operation on moderately steep slopes in second-growth forests in coastal British Columbia. This report presents the productivity and cost of the skidding operation, identifies the factors that influence performance of the grapple skidder, and describes the soil disturbance resulting from skidding.
Timberjack 660D grapple skidder
Harvesting
Skidding
Loader-forwarding
Productivity
Costs
British Columbia
Second growth
Steep slopes
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Evaluation of two loader-forwarder configurations on steep slopes

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39849
Author
Strimbu, Vladimir
MacDonald, A.J.
Date
June 2014
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
decreased as slope increased and was minor on the steepest slopes. Keywords Steep slopes, Harvesting
Author
Strimbu, Vladimir
MacDonald, A.J.
Date
June 2014
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Steep slopes
Harvesting
Equipment
Loaders
Forwarders
Productivity
Costs
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 15, No. 2
Language
English
ISSN
14933381
Abstract
Ground-based harvesting systems typically provide lower operating costs than cable systems on steep terrain. Expanding the operating range of ground-based equipment on steeper slopes is critical to the sustained economic health of the forest industry. FPInnovations monitored the productivities of two loader-forwarders, a levelling-cab Tigercat LS855C and non-levelling cab Tigercat 880, operating on an old-growth coastal cutblock. The study indicated that both machines were capable of negotiating all the slopes in the operating area which averaged 34%. Productivity was primarily influenced by forwarding distance. The effect of forwarding distance on productivity remained almost the same with varying slope. Felling method and forwarding direction had the next largest effects on loader-forwarder productivity. Mechanical falling improved productivity most when used on short forwarding distances. The average measured reach of the LS855C was about 89% that of the 880, compared to the nominal ratio of 73% based on machine specifications. The smaller, levelling-cab machine was less productive than the larger machine in all situations, although the differences in machine productivities decreased as slope increased and was minor on the steepest slopes.
Abstract
Les systèmes de récolte au sol offrent habituellement des coûts d’utilisation inférieurs à ceux des systèmes par câbles en terrain accidenté. L’augmentation de la portée de l’équipement au sol sur les pentes abruptes est capitale pour assurer la santé économique de l’industrie forestière. FPInnovations a suivi la productivité de deux porteurs autochargeurs, soit un Tigercat LS855C à cabine à correcteur de niveau et un Tigercat 880 sans correcteur de niveau, travaillant dans un vieux peuplement sur un bloc de coupe côtier. Cette étude a montré que les deux porteurs ont été en mesure de négocier toutes les pentes du bloc de coupe, dont la moyenne était de 34 %. La distance d’acheminement a joué le plus grand rôle sur la productivité. L’effet de la distance d’acheminement sur la productivité est demeuré pratiquement le même, peu importe la pente. La méthode d’abattage et la direction de l’acheminement figurent ensuite sur la liste des facteurs ayant le plus influencé la productivité des chargeurs autoporteurs. L’abattage mécanique a permis d’augmenter la productivité dans la plus forte mesure lorsque les distances d’acheminement étaient courtes. La portée moyenne mesurée pour le porteur LS855C était d’environ 89 % de la portée du porteur 880, comparativement au ratio nominal de 73 % du fabricant. Le porteur autochargeur à cabine à correcteur de niveau, plus petit, s’est avéré moins productif que l’autre machine dans toutes les situations. Cependant, la différence de productivité s’est avérée de plus en plus petite à mesure que la pente augmentait, pour devenir mineure sur les pentes les plus abruptes.
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Factors affecting productivity of skyline yarding systems: results of six case studies in northwestern British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36798
Author
Boswell, Brian
Date
January 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
. Mountainous terrain. Steep slopes. Productivity, Costs, Regression model, Thuruierbird TMY-70, Thurulerbird
Author
Boswell, Brian
Date
January 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Steep slopes
Yarders
Simulation
Rocks
Productivity
Logs
Harvesting
Growth
Costs
Cable logging
British Columbia
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR-000127
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC conducted six case studies on long-distance skyline yarding systems operating near Terrace, British Columbia in 1995. The studies were conducted to investigate why skyline operators in B.C. are experiencing a wide range of productivities and costs. The study sites were located in the wet submaritime subzone of the Coastal Western Hemlock biogeoclimate zone (CWHws).
Harvesting
Clearcutting
Cable logging
Skyline
Rock anchors
Old growth forests
Western hemlock
Montainous terrain
Steep slopes
Productivity
Costs
Models and simulation
Thunderbird TMY-70 yarder
Thunderbird TY-90 yarder
Madill 009 yarder
WASHINGTON 78SL YARDER
Eagle III motorized carriage
Eagle II motorized carriage
Coastal British Columbia
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Grapple yarding burned timber in north-central Alberta

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40856
Author
Dyson, Peter
Date
1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Dyson, Peter
Date
1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Wildfire Operations
Subject
Timber
Steep slopes
Pinus
Spruce
Productivity
Processing
Alberta
Series Number
Field Note ; Processing-FN-000057
Language
English
Abstract
Burned timber
Processing
Grapple yarders
HANDFELLING
Steep slopes
Pine
Spruce
Productivity
Madill 122 grapple swing yarder
Alberta
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38 records – page 1 of 4.