Skip header and navigation

40 records – page 1 of 4.

Assessment of two green gluing processes for finger jointing

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5074
Author
Verreault, C.
Date
April 2000
Edition
41921
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Verreault, C.
Date
April 2000
Edition
41921
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Transfer
Pinus
Spruce
Joints
Gluing
Canada
Black spruce
Balsam
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 2407
E-3386
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Green finger jointing is increasingly becoming a proven possibity with three main technological processes, the New Zealand Greenweld process, the US soybean-based adhesive process and the US soybean-based adhesive process by assessing drying degrade and mechanical performance of green-glued finger-jointed material after drying. The urethane-based adhesive process was studied in a previous project. Overall, we did not observe performance differences between the Greenweld and the soybean-based adhesive processes. This was to be expected since they are both phenol resorcinol formaldehyde types of adhesives. Thus, the process choice should be made based on other considerations than mechanical performance, such as economical or procedure preferences. In comparison with the polyurethane adhesive studied before, it appears obvious that more stress concentration is present at the joint after drying because of the failure modes observed. However, with long term use, this product (the urethane-based adhesive) still needs to be studied because it is less known than the two other phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde based processes. The results also demonstrate that green finger-jointing material, such as black spruce and balsam fir, could at least be used to produce stud grade lumber.
Forintek Canada Corp. - Report
Finger Joints
Green gluing
Black spruce
Balsam fire
Technology transfer
Documents
Less detail

Automated wood failure evaluation technology transfer

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1075
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
April 1998
Edition
37478
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
V6T 1W5 Project No.: 1784 Automated Wood Failure Evaluation Technology Transfer
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
April 1998
Edition
37478
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
47 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Transfer
Testing
Plywood
Instrumentation
Gluing
Series Number
W-1514
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Wood failure evaluation is the key criterion for predicting the long-term durability of plywood. At present, the conventional visual method for plywood wood failure evaluation is slow and subjective. Evaluations can be influenced by factors such as: room lighting, wood species, sample treatment, and readings from prior samples. An automated wood failure evaluation system using image analysis techniques could potentially be programmed to consider all the variables and respond with consistent wood failure values regardless of the machine operator's experience level. This report describes the results of a six-month study in which a system for automated plywood wood failure determination was compared with conventional visual wood failure evaluation. It was built upon research undertaken in the 1996/97 year in which the feasibility of the approach was initially established. In the research reported previously, a colour optical imaging system was assembled and suitable wood failure algorithms were compiled with promising results. The imaging system was 100 % effective in reproducing sample values. The data were discussed with the project liaisons and a three-month comparison with Canply readings was suggested. In this study, machine evaluation of 4,150 samples was compared with readings of monthly plywood mill quality control samples. The sampling was designed to include all British Columbia plywood mills and all categories of commercial plywood production. The differences in average values for wood failure between human and machine evaluation were found to be less than plus or minus 5% in the majority of cases. In addition, 93 % of ‘set average' readings fell in the plus or minus 10% range of deviation expected of human wood failure readers. Agreement on readings of individual samples within each set was not quite as good with 72% falling in the plus or minus 15% range.
Technology transfer
Plywood - Gluing - Tests
Plywood - Tests - Control instruments
Instruments, Testing
Documents
Less detail

Carte routière technologique pour les opérations forestières du Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4052
Contributor
Canada. Industrie Canada
Date
1997
Edition
40783
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Contributor
Canada. Industrie Canada
Date
1997
Edition
40783
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
VOC Volatile Organic Compounds
Visual efficiency
Transport
Transfer
Systems
Silviculture
Simulation
Satellite
Robotics
Logging
Operations
Machines
Machine operator
Materials tests
Global positioning system (GPS)
Canada
Automatic control
Series Number
Rapport spécial ; RS-000117
Language
French
Abstract
Le rapport présente une carte routière traçant les grandes lignes d'une stratégie d'innovation technologique, de recherche et de développement, ainsi que de transfert technologique pour les opérations forestières canadiennes au cours de la prochaine décennie. La carte identifie les points de départ et d'arrivée, discute des forces motrices, décrit les occasions favorables à des améliorations technologiques et donne des recommandations sur la meilleure route à choisir pour l'avenir.
Documents
Less detail

The Climber 4000 weight-transfer system for increasing drive-axle traction

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub450
Author
MacGregor, D.T.
Date
1997
Edition
36688
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
MacGregor, D.T.
Date
1997
Edition
36688
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Weight
Transfer
Tractor trailer
Systems
Series Number
Field Note ; Loading & Trucking-FN-000055
Language
English
Abstract
TRACTOR-TRAILER COMBINATIONS
TRACTION-ASSIST DEVICES
CLIMBER 4000 WEIGHT-TRANSFER SYSTEM
Documents
Less detail

Data transfer from harvester computers

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40607
Author
Makkonen, Ismo
Date
2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Makkonen, Ismo
Date
2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Transfer
Productivity
Harvesters
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 3, No. 46
Language
English
Abstract
Onboard computers on modern cut-to-length harvesters collect production, stand, and machine time data that can be transferred to the office computer for analysis. The data files can be manipulated with data management software, and then copied into equipment- and forest-management applications.
Harvester computers
Data transfer
Productivity
Documents
Less detail

Development of heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42239
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
as such members remain in good standing. Development of Heat-transfer Models for Wood-frame Assemblies
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
17 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No 9
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Computer fire modelling is an important high-tech tool in fire safety engineering and fire science. The movement towards objective-based building codes means that these models will find application in performance-based fire-safety design of wood structures. Accordingly for more than a decade, fire researchers at Forintek strove to develop heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies exposed to fire. Then, in 2001 Forintek elected to outsource all future development of these models. This project provides funding, direction and oversight for the outside development of these design tools. Canadian officials identified construction of wood-frame buildings in Japan as an important market priority. To aid them in their endeavours, in 2002-2003 Forintek contracted the development of a heat transfer model for exterior walls constructed with exterior expanded polystyrene-foam (EPS) insulation and ceramic-siding rains screens when subjected to standard fire exposures on the outside face. In 2003-2004 Forintek contracted to have further refinements made to that heat transfer model so that users would have the option of selecting either exterior EPS insulation or exterior semi-rigid glass-fibre insulation panels. That work was completed and comparisons between the model’s predictions and the results of full-scale tests show good agreement. A paper describing Forintek’s heat transfer model for exterior walls with exterior insulation and non-combustible rain-screens, and comparisons between the model’s predicted outcomes and the results of full-scale fire tests on such assemblies will be presented later this year at the 8th World Conference on Timber Engineering. In recent years Japanese building regulations were revised to permit construction of wood-frame (combustible) buildings within the high-density urban centres (Fire Protection Zones) of their larger cities if the major loadbearing elements in those buildings met specific requirements for fireproof construction. Those requirements have been dubbed the “one-plus-three” test requirements because for “low-rise” wood-frame apartment buildings and large houses they include exhibiting one-hour of fire-resistance when tested in accordance with ISO 834, and continued fire resistance without structural collapse when the test assembly is maintained under structural load with the fire-test furnace in-place against the side of the assembly for an additional three hours. Again, to assist in promoting markets for Canadian wood products in Japan, in 2003-2004 Forintek commenced modifying its WALL2D heat transfer model so that it would be capable of predicting the thermal response of walls subjected to the fire (thermal) exposures specified in Japan’s one-plus-three test method, parametric, and “real” fire scenarios. In preparation for that work, a Forintek scientist traveled to Japan to gather more information about the “one-plus-three” testing procedures. Later, Forintek contracted the service of Dr H. Takeda to travel to Japan to obtain thermo-physical property data for the gypsum board products commonly used in construction of wood buildings complying with Japanese specifications for fireproof construction. The information obtained from these two trips indicated that the successful completion of revisions to the WALL2D model would be much more difficult and require much more time than had originally been anticipated. With the support of Forintek, one of the students enrolled at Carleton University, Steven Craft, chose as the topic for his PhD thesis the reliability of wood-frame floors in fire. One of the tasks that he is carrying out for his thesis is the development of a heat transfer model for floor assemblies constructed with solid-wood joists. Dr Hadjisophocleous, the Chair in Fire Safety Engineering at the university, and Craft’s thesis advisor, submitted a proposal to Materials Manufacturing Ontario (MMO) which would leverage Forintek’s financial support to Craft and enable Hadjisophocleous to build an entire research program around Craft’s thesis research. MMO accepted the proposal. One of the biggest problems encountered in performance-base fire-safety design of large commercial structures is selecting the proper design or “realistic” fire scenario to be used when modeling fire resistance. For large commercial building with atria, establishing the required fire exposures on the boundaries of the atria from a fire within those tall, large open spaces is a particularly difficult issue. Therefore, in 2003, fire researchers in Australia submitted a proposal to the Australian Research Council (ARC) to study this subject. Forintek will provide some support for the work. All of these activities will continue in 2004-2005.
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
Less detail

Development of heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies : 2002-2003 progress

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42193
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
as such members remain in good standing. Development of Heat-transfer Models for Wood-frame Assemblies
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2003
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
CFS No 9
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Computer fire modelling is one of the most important high-tech tools in fire safety engineering and fire science. The movement towards objective-based building codes means that these models will be essential tools for performance-based fire-safety design of wood structures. Accordingly for more than a decade, fire researchers at Forintek have been striving to develop heat-transfer models (HT models) for wood-frame assemblies exposed to fire. Then, in 2001 Forintek elected to outsource all future development of these models. This project provides funding, direction and oversight for the outside development of these design tools. Because both the Canadian government and the wood industry had identified construction of wood-frame buildings in Japan as a market priority, and the fire performance of exterior wood-frame walls with exterior foam-plastic insulation and ceramic-siding rain screens, a popular Japanese housing design, as one of their biggest hurdles in capturing a larger share of that market, in 2002-2003, efforts were focused on development of a model to predict heat transfer through that specific type of assembly. Using WALL2D, Forintek’s HT model for wood-frame walls with gypsum board on both sides as the foundation, Nortak Software Ltd. was contracted to complete Forintek’s development of a model to predict heat transfer through wood-frame exterior walls subjected on the exterior face to ISO 834 fire exposures. While Forintek researchers knew that the Japan Testing Center for Construction Materials (JTCCM) in Tokyo had carried out fire tests on exterior wood-frame walls with expanded-polystyrene (EPS) exterior insulation and ceramic-siding rain screens, little was known about the outcome of those tests, the pass/fail criteria used in assessing such assemblies, and the problems, if any, that were encountered in carrying out the tests. Also, in ISO 834 tests, the fire gases within test furnaces are under a small positive pressure. The ability, if any, of those furnace pressures to drive hot fire gases through the ventilation/drainage holes in the rain screen and directly into the cavities behind the ceramic siding, and the direction of that gas flow within the cavities were completely unknown. Of greater significance and equal uncertainty was the effect that those conditions might have on the EPS insulation backing upon the cavities. Also, there was a dearth of information in Canada about design and construction practices followed in Japan for these types of walls. Another concern for Forintek was our ability to obtain test data for validation of the HT model once it had been developed. Finally, overriding all other concerns was the willingness of Japanese testing organizations, regulatory officials, manufacturers of building materials, and builders to accept the use of models to predict the fire performance of these types of assemblies. Therefore, Forintek contracted the service of Dr. Hisahiro Takeda to travel to the JTCCM to gather intelligence answering each of these concerns. Development of Foritnek’s HT model for exterior walls with exterior EPS insulation and ceramic-siding rains screens will be completed by September 2003. Forintek will then aid Canadian government and industry officials in exporting Canadian housing technology and Canadian building products to Japan by working with officials at NRCan CANMET in selecting optimum designs for exterior wall assemblies to be used in construction of energy efficient houses in Japan. At the same time, Forintek will work with other industry and governmental officials to promote and market Canadian housing technology and Canadian building products in China, Taiwan and Korea by using the model to demonstrate the fire resistance of exterior wood-frame walls. Finally, Forintek will attempt to work with researchers at the JTCCM to market the model in Japan.
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
Less detail

Development of heat transfer models for wood-frame assemblies : 2004-2005 progress

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42307
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Report 2004/05 9 Development of Heat Transfer Models for Wood-frame Assemblies 2004-2005 Progress
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 9
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
Less detail

Development of heat transfer models for wood-frame assemblies : progress in 2005-2006

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub38932
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Development of Heat Transfer Models for Wood-Frame Assemblies - Progress in 2005-2006
Author
Richardson, L.R.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood frame
Wood
Transfer
Heat transfer
Heat
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 9
3636
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Computer fire modelling is an important high-tech tool in fire safety engineering and fire science. The transition to objective-based building codes means that these models will find application in performance-based fire-safety design of wood structures. Accordingly for more than a decade, fire researchers at Forintek strove to develop heat-transfer models for wood-frame assemblies exposed to fire. Dubbed WALL2D, the model developed by Forintek’s researchers predicts heat transfer through simple non-bearing wood-stud walls filled with thermal/acoustical insulation in the stud cavities and gypsum board on the two faces. Then, in 2001 Forintek elected to outsource all future development of these models. This project provides funding, direction and oversight for the outside development of these design tools. A paper by H. Takeda and L.R. Richardson entitled A Heat Transfer Model to Simulate Japan's 1+3 Fire Endurance Test for Wood-Framed Wall Assemblies was presented at the IAWPS 2005 Conference organized by the Japan Wood Research Society (JWRS) and the International Association of Wood Products Societies (IAWPS). A paper by H. Takeda and L.R. Richardson entitled A Model to Simulate Japan’s ‘1 + 3’ Fire Endurance Test was submitted for presentation at the 31st International Symposium on Combustion (2006) in Heidelberg, Germany on August 6-11, 2006. A Japanese-language paper by H. Takeda roughly translated as Wood-Frame Wall Fire Resistance Simulation Model was published in Wood Industry 60(3)134-137. The Journal is published by the Wood Technological Association of Japan. Through the efforts of researchers and students at Carleton University, and with funding assistance from the Ontario Centres of Excellence, development of computer models to predict the response of wood-frame floor assemblies to fire attack, including both the thermal and the structural response of such assemblies, and models to predict the probability of failure of wood-frame building elements during fire continued. As part of his PhD studies, S. Craft undertook a directed studies project which investigated the behaviour of gypsum board and wood at elevated temperatures. His goal was the development of sub-models which better address the kinetics of calcination of gypsum board and the pyrolysis of wood. To more effectively model heat transfer though wood and gypsum board, Forintek established a collaborative contract with the material testing division of the National Research Council Canada (NRC) to provide additional thermal analysis test data (differential thermal analysis {DTA}; thermal-gravimetric and analysis {TGA}; and differential scanning calorimetry {DSC}) for gypsum board and spruce wood. Based upon his analysis of the data, Craft submitted a Directed Studies Report to Carleton University entitled Modelling the Thermal Degradation of Gypsum Board and Wood Using TGA. A poster presentation by J.R. Mehaffey, S. Craft, G. Hadjisophocleous and B. Isgor entitled Fire Response of Gypsum Board and Wood Framing was given at the 8th International Symposium sponsored by the International Association of Fire Safety Science. Finally, a paper by S. Craft, G. Hadjisophocleous, B. Isgor and J. Mehaffey entitled Predicting the Fire Resistance of Light-Frame Wood Floor Assemblies was submitted and has been accepted for presentation at the 4th International Workshop on Structures in Fire (SiF’06) on May 10-12, 2006 at the University of Aveiro in Portugal. In August 2005, Forintek established an agreement with SwRI whereby researchers at SwRI would assess the feasibility of utilizing commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) programs to model wood members (e.g. heavy-timber beams and columns) exposed to fire conditions. The fire resistance of a glulam beam was modeled in two-dimensions using five different FEA programs commonly used to predict the response of structures exposed to elevated temperature. The output of each model was compared with experimental data for wood beams from tests conducted in 1997 at SwRI. Following the completion of this research, a paper by B. Badders (SwRI) and J.R. Mehaffey and L.R. Richardson (Forintek) entitled Using Commercial FEA Software Packages to Model the Fire Performance of Exposed GLULAM Beams was submitted and has been accepted for presentation at the 4th International Workshop on Structures in Fire (SiF’06) on May 10-12, 2006 at the University of Aveiro in Portugal. While this project officially ended on March 31, 2006, many of the activities underway at that time will continue as components of other Forintek research projects or through the activities of the Carleton University Industrial Research Chair in Fire Safety Engineering.
Wood-frame assemblies
Heat transfer
Models
Documents
Less detail

L'Escaladeur 4000, un système de transfert de poids pour augmenter la traction des essieux moteurs

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40787
Author
MacGregor, D.T.
Date
1997
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
MacGregor, D.T.
Date
1997
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Transportation Infrastructure
Subject
Transfer
Systems
Trailers
Trucks
Series Number
Communiqué technique ; Chargement & camionnage-CT-000055
Language
French
Abstract
Ensembles camion-remorque
SYSTEMES D'AIDE A LA TRACTION
SYSTEME DE TRANSFERT DE POIDS ESCALADEUR 4000
Documents
Less detail

40 records – page 1 of 4.