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Analytical and experimental assessment of heel bending moments [for trusses]

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5305
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Date
April 2003
Edition
42178
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2003
Edition
42178
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
3 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Design
Series Number
CFS Simple Progress Report No. 10
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Trusses - Design
Documents
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Assessment of fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected truss applications

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2669
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39268
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
in the lumber and truss industry to supply and use fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected wood trusses
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2010
Edition
39268
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
59 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
AFRI ; 201000788
W-2748
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
There is interest in the lumber and truss industry to supply and use fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected wood trusses. To support this, it is necessary to provide evidence that fingerjoined lumber meeting the requirements of a recognized fingerjoined lumber product standard can be used with the lumber design provision provided in the governing wood engineering design code. In consultation with the truss and lumber industry, it was agreed that fingerjoined machine graded lumber meeting the requirements of the National Lumber Grades Authority (NLGA) Special Product Standard 4 (SPS 4) would be assessed for truss applications. The assessment would need to show no issues with applying the lumber design provisions in Clause 5.5.13 of CSA O86, the Canadian Engineering Design in Wood Code, to NLGA SPS 4 fingerjoined lumber. This is necessary because Clause 5.5.13 was originally developed for non-fingerjoined lumber and applies specifically to the design of lumber in truss applications. The tests carried out under this program included bending test specimens with 1 to 4 joints per specimen tested to failure under three different bending moment configurations, and single fingerjoints tested to failure under pure axial tension or compression, and then under eccentrically applied axial tension or compression to induce bending in addition to the axial loading. All test specimens were prepared using a 2100f-1.8E grade spruce-pine-fir lumber and because the test to failure was typically less than 5 minutes, polyvinyl acetate (PVA) adhesive was used to bond the fingerjoints to facilitate joint fabrication. Additional testing was also carried out to extend the testing protocol developed in 2008-09 for assessing fingerjoint adhesives under sustained tension loads. Samples bonded with a known performing adhesive, phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), were substituted with samples bonded with PVA, a known poor performer under sustained loads. In the bending test, test span configuration and characteristic number of joints showed strong effects on the average bending capacity of the fingerjoints. While more joints in the region of maximum bending moment were expected to contribute to lower bending capacities, this was not as evident in this study. This is likely due to the small sample sizes and the tight control over the joint strength (i.e. low strength variability). Instead, having one or more fingerjoints in the maximum moment zone but near the load points appeared to have a stronger effect. The bending strength reductions were on the order of 5 to 10%. In the combined loading test, loading eccentricity showed a strong effect on the capacity of the fingerjoints in both tension-bending and compression-bending. The tension-bending interaction should be noted for those evaluating online or offline tension test results. Both the tension-bending and compression-bending results are consistent with the assumptions in the CSA O86 design code.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger - Tests
Documents
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Behaviour of truss plate joints under shear loading

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1551
Author
Lau, P.W.C.
Date
April 1984
Edition
38057
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lau, P.W.C.
Date
April 1984
Edition
38057
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
14 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Testing
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 5/83-84
E-155
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Truss Plate Connector - Testing
Trusses - Testing
Documents
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Computer analysis of parallel chord truss systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37241
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 1991
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
trusses and 28xl6-ft. p a r a l l e l chord truss systems are being analyzed. Two computer models - NSAT
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 1991
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
32 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Compression
Mechanical properties
Simulation
Joints
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 12;5410P001
W-858
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The report presents the verification of two truss analysis computer programs developed at Forintek. Validation consisted of comparing the computed truss deflections with the deflections measured from full scale truss tests conducted at Forintek. Issues which should be considered when modeling parallel chord trusses using either of the two computer models are discussed. A strategy for estimating lateral load sharing and composite action in flat roof and floor systems using these models with the Floor Analysis Program (FAP) is discussed.
Trusses - Computer simulation
Joints and fastenings - Strength - Computer simulation
Documents
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Exploratory study of the short-term and long-term behavior of truss-plate joints in tension under ambient laboratory conditions

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36907
Author
Palka, L.C.
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Palka, L.C.
Date
March 1988
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
59 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Tension
Mechanical properties
Joints
Alloy
Series Number
CFS No. 18
contract no.87-54-10C-009
W-566
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Trusses
Joints and fastenings
Connectors, Metal plate
Strength - Tension - Tests
Documents
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Fingerjoined lumber for long span truss applications : Phase II

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37728
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
trusses were presented to the I W G at a meeting held in M a y 2002. During this meeting, the group also
Author
Lum, Conroy
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2005
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
5 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 45;4320
W-2157
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The intent of this project is to systematically build the infrastructure to expand the end uses of fingerjoined lumber products. Through fingerjoining lumber, the lumber industry may be able to produce a product that helps the truss industry remain competitive. While not all of the advantages of steel can be countered, fingerjoining should provide some flexibility to lumber producers so that they can continue to meet the needs of the wood truss industry. Based on the results of the first phase and on the discussions that followed, the IWG suggested a number of other potential issues to be further examined for particularly long-span trusses in a follow-up two-year project.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger
Documents
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Fingerjoined lumber for long span truss applications : Phase II. Effect of over-embedding truss plates and fingerjoint offset on plate capacity

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37790
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
connected trusses was carried out in two phases. The first phase examined the effect of truss plate over
Author
Lum, Conroy
Casilla, Romulo C.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2006
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
41 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Testing
Mechanical properties
Joints
Design
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 45
4320
W-2277
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A research program aimed at examining some issues arising from use of fingerjoined lumber for long-span metal plate connected trusses was carried out in two phases. The first phase examined the effect of truss plate over-embedding and fingerjoint offset on plate capacity in small wood specimens. The results indicated that the presence of joint offset had a significant effect on plate capacity, and that over-embedding the plate into the joint bonded with polyvinyl acetate had significant effects on joint strength. In the second phase, two follow-up studies were conducted to evaluate: i) the effect of truss plate over-embedding on strength of fingerjoints bonded with phenol-resorcinol formaldehyde, and ii) the effect of joint offset on plate capacity in tension perpendicular to grain and in tension parallel to grain in large wood members. The present over-embedding study corroborated the results obtained in the first phase, i.e., over-embedding had a significant effect on fingerjoint strength. In bending, the severity of effect depended upon plate location. Where plates were applied on edge face, over-pressed plates gave 27% lower bending strength (MOR) compared to normally pressed plates and 35% lower than control (not plated), and normally pressed plates showed 11% lower MOR compared to control. Where plates were applied on flat face, over-pressed plates yielded 20% lower and normally pressed plates 14% lower MOR compared to control, but there was no significant difference between over-pressed and normally pressed plates. Plate location had no significant effect on MOR of normally pressed plates and that of control, but did have a significant effect on over-pressed plates. In the latter, plating on flat face gave 23% greater MOR compared to that on edge face. In tension, the severity of over-embedding effect also depended upon plate location. Over-pressed plates gave 29% and 16% lower ultimate tensile strength (UTS) compared to normally pressed plates when plates were applied on edge and flat face, respectively. On both faces, over-pressed plates yielded 18% lower UTS compared to control, but there was no significant difference between normally pressed plates and control. In the fingerjoint offset study, the presence of offset did not have a significant effect on truss plate capacity in tension perpendicular to grain. However, the joint control without offset yielded significantly greater (about 6%) ultimate tensile load (UTL) compared to solid horizontal control. Plate location also had a significant effect on plate capacity. Plating on flat face gave 13% greater UTL compared to that on edge face. This was similar to that observed in the plate over-embedding study. Also, the presence of joint offset did not have a significant effect on plate capacity in tension parallel to grain in 2 x 4 wood members. The present results showed similarities to and differences from those obtained in the first phase depending upon plate grip location. One negative implication is that over-embedding truss plates over fingerjoints should be avoided. This should be inspected as part of truss fabrication quality inspection. On the positive side, generally the NLGA 1/16-inch maximum fingerjoint offset should not impact truss plate capacity in tension perpendicular or parallel to grain.
Glued joints - Finger
Trusses - Joints
Trusses - Design
Trusses - Strength - Tests
Documents
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Fingerjoined lumber for truss applications : draft truss handling guidelines and fingerjoined lumber product standard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub39329
Author
Lum, Conroy
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
– Fingerjoined Lumber in Trusses 28 May 2008, FPInnovations Forintek (Board Room) 1. Opening Remarks
Author
Lum, Conroy
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2011
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
40 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Specifications
Specification
Alloy
Series Number
Value to Wood No. 119W
W-2810
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Under this project, a set of guidelines for using fingerjoined lumber for metal plate connected trusses has been prepared. This project is a result of several projects undertaken over the last 10 years on trusses, trusses and fingerjoined lumber, and the development of new structural wood adhesive standards. The draft guidelines are based on findings from previous Value-to-Wood studies, and on information gathered from truss fabricator interviews and surveys carried out by FPInnovations Industry Advisors of the past year. The guidelines also assume that the fingerjoined lumber is produced to the recently updated National Lumber Grades Authority Special Products Standard (SPS) 4, which was revised to reference the latest edition of the Canadian wood adhesive standard CSA O112.10. While use of this standard permits the fingerjoined lumber industry to use a wider range of structural wood adhesives, it does require that the lumber be marked as “Dry Use Only”. Given that NLGA SPS 4 is the first standard on commodity structural fingerjoined lumber to have a “Dry Use Only” label, the development of these guidelines is timely. The guidelines will not only help the truss industry and builders to better understand and properly use the product, but it will also help in code acceptance of the NLGA SPS 4 standard.
Connectors, Metal plate
Fingerjoined lumber
Trusses - Specifications
Documents
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Fingerjoined lumber for truss applications : effect of fingerjoint offset and overpressing truss plates

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37629
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Lum, Conroy
Date
April 2002
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
ii Summary Lumber trusses are an essential part of residential and other light frame building
Author
Casilla, Romulo C.
Lum, Conroy
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
April 2002
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Roofs
Trusses
Joints
Design
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 18;2721
W-1890
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Lumber trusses are an essential part of residential and other light frame building construction. The use of metal plate connectors has been an accepted form of connecting wood members to build up the trusses for these constructions. Wood trusses are a potentially viable application for fingerjoined structural lumber. However, little information is available on the strength of the fingerjoined member when truss plates are applied on or in the vicinity of a fingerjoint. This project deals with issues that may arise from the use of fingerjoined lumber in metal plate-connected truss applications aimed at optimizing the use of wood to meet end-user expectations in terms of structural performance. To meet the objective, a phased approach was taken involving representatives from both the lumber producing and wood truss industries. Phases included: (i) creation of an Industry Working Group (IWG) to discuss the issues that may arise from the widespread use of fingerjoined lumber in truss applications and identify relevant studies, (ii) carrying out the identified priority studies, (iii) and identification of issues that would need additional research. The IWG was composed of 12 members representing truss fabricators, truss plate manufacturers, and lumber producers. The industrial partners in the project are Canadian Forest Products Ltd., Jager Building Systems, Inc., and Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. The members of the IWG convened last year, and discussed potential research items for the project. As a result of the meeting, two basic studies were identified as priorities, namely: (i) effect of fingerjoint offset on truss plate capacity, and (ii) effect of truss plate over-pressing on plate capacity. These two studies have been completed and results are reported.
Trusses - Design
Glued joints - Finger
Documents
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Fingerjoined lumber used in parallel chord wood trusses

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42048
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Date
August 2001
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Desjardins, Richard
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
August 2001
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Roofs
Trusses
Series Number
CFS Simple Progress Report No. 12
E-3558
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Fingerjoined lumber
Wood trusses
Documents
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35 records – page 1 of 4.