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143 records – page 1 of 15.

Accelerated aging and outdoor weathering of aspen waferboard

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub4743
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Alexopoulos, J.
Date
March 1991
Edition
41549
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
39 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Alberta
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Waferboards
Utilization
Aspen
Aging
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 1
E-1235
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Waferboard
Aspen - Utilization
Waferboard - Aging
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Alternate uses for wood treated with carbon-based preservatives at the end of service life

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42901
Author
Stirling, Rod
Daniels, C. Robert
Morris, Paul I.
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Stirling, Rod
Daniels, C. Robert
Morris, Paul I.
Contributor
Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2009
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
20 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Waste utilization
Utilization
Recycling
Preservatives carbon
Preservatives
Series Number
W-2976
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The absence of commercial facilities to recycle or recover value from wood treated with metal-based wood preservatives at the end of its service life is one of the most significant negative points in the generally positive life cycle analysis of treated wood. Wood treated with carbon-based preservatives (metal-free) may be far easier to recycle or recover value from since the preservatives are relatively vulnerable to thermal, chemical and biological breakdown. As a result they might be destroyed by kraft pulping, combustion or composting of treated wood. The present research evaluates the use of carbon-based preservative-treated wood in these processes. Kraft pulps produced from wood freshly treated with recommended loadings of carbon-based preservatives contained significant quantities of didecyldimethylammonium carbonate (DDAcarbonate), propiconazole and tebuconazole. However, lower preservative concentration in the wood and intensive pulping may be able to produce pulps without detectable preservatives. The azoles were also detected in significant quantities in the black liquor (DDAcarbonate was not analysed in black liquor). No azoles were found in the ash produced from combustion, but significant quantities were detected in the filtered smoke. DDAcarbonate was not detected in the filtered smoke. Analysis of DDAcarbonate in ash was inconclusive. A composting experiment has been set up and is in progress. Data on preservative breakdown during composting is expected next year.
RECYCLING
Preservatives - Carbon
Waste - Utilization for pulp
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Amélioration de la durabilité des fenêtres en bois par l'utilisation de résines naturelles

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5738
Author
Blanchard, Vincent
Gignac, Manon
Dranebois, C.
Date
March 2011
Edition
39369
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Blanchard, Vincent
Gignac, Manon
Dranebois, C.
Date
March 2011
Edition
39369
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
38 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Windows
Utilization
Resin
Series Number
Valeur au bois no FPI-111E
201003063-Tâche 5
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Windows - Degradation
Resin - Utilization
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Assessing new product opportunities for the veneer-based product industry

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2762
Author
Wang, Brad J.
Dai, Chunping
Poon, James
Xu, H.
Date
June 2011
Edition
39378
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Brad J.
Dai, Chunping
Poon, James
Xu, H.
Date
June 2011
Edition
39378
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
27 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer
Utilization
Plywood
Markets
Series Number
W-2849
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Potential market gain for Canadian softwood plywood in residential construction could arise from the emerging Chinese market to build massive numbers of affordable apartments and the upcoming rebuilding effort in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami disaster. Compared to the main Chinese species (poplar), common BC species, such as Douglas-fir, spruce and hem-fir, have competitive advantages in the aspects of log diameter, wood properties and veneer quality and processing productivity. For non-residential construction, Canadian plywood concrete forms also offer competitive advantages over Chinese overlaid poplar counterparts due to their higher stiffness and strength. However, the production cost has to be kept to below US$ 500/m3 for a profit margin. Further, three-ply and four-ply Canadian softwood plywood panels are ideally suited for the base materials of multi-layer composite floor, which currently is gaining momentum in China and other countries. A sizeable increase in industrial and remodelling market is anticipated for the Canadian plywood industry. This will be mainly driven by a number of specialty plywood products, such as container floor and pallet, light truck, utility vehicle, trailer and camper manufacturing. However, these products are not commonly manufactured by larger commodity manufacturers in Canada. China is currently the largest global supplier of container floors, most of which are made from imported plywood, bamboo and poplar veneer. To meet their stringent requirements and gain a market share, Canadian plywood industry should take appropriate actions in adjusting veneer thickness, veneer grade, veneer treatment, and panel lay-up. Japan has developed customized products such as oversized plywood for wall applications, and termite/mould resistant plywood for above ground and ground-contact applications. China has developed numerous new value-added veneer products for niche markets. Such products include marine plywood, sound reducing plywood, non-slip plywood, metal faced plywood, curved plywood and medium density fiberboard (MDF) or particleboard (PB)-faced plywood. In order to stay competitive in the global market, Canadian plywood industry needs to:
remove the trade constraints between softwood plywood and hardwood plywood,
remove in-plant manufacturing barriers to deal with both softwood and hardwood processing,
diversify products for both appearance and structural based applications, and
develop new value-added products for niche markets. This study suggests the following opportunities for Canadian plywood producers to
incorporate naturally decay-resistant species such as cedar as surface veneer and/or perform veneer or glueline treatment to make marine and exterior plywood for improved durability,
characterize veneer properties from the changing resource for better utilization,
peel some thinner and higher quality veneer for making specialty plywood,
conduct stress grading in combination with visual grading to maximize value recovery from the available resource,
increase the flexibility of panel lay-up for domestic/overseas markets and various applications,
develop mixed species plywood by mixing available hardwood species such as birch, maple, alder, aspen veneer (as overlay materials) with softwood plywood to achieve better appearance and higher performance,
develop new structural composite lumber (SCL) products such as veneer strand lumber (VSL) from low quality logs, particularly beetle-killed, and random veneer or waste veneer,
develop new drying, pressing and adhesive technologies for processing high moisture veneer, particularly hem-fir and spruce, to improve productivity and bond quality and reduce panel delamination,
develop light weight and strong hybrid plywood panels for furniture applications, by adding MDF or PB on the face of plywood,
develop hybrid plywood for floor applications to reduce thickness swell and increase dimensional stability and stiffness,
develop hybrid cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels from lumber, plywood and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) for low- and mid-rise residential and non-residential applications, and
develop a series of new product standards for specialty plywood. A market research study for each product opportunity is recommended to develop a solid business case for each.
Composite products - Markets
Plywood - Markets
Plywood - Utilization
Veneers - Markets
Veneers - Utilization
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At-the-stump and roadside log processing in Alberta: a comparison

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43999
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
1994
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Araki, Dennis
Date
1994
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Chips
Stumps
Alberta
Wood
Utilization
Systems
Satellite
Roads
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Productivity
Harvesting
Costs
British Columbia
Series Number
FO Special Report ; SR 96
Language
English
Abstract
Harvesting systems
Roadside harvesting
Cut-to-length harvesting systems
Undersized stems
UTILIZATION
Wood chips
Chip quality
Satellite chipping
PRODUCTIVITY
COSTS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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A bioenergy strategy for British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3049
Contributor
British Columbia. Ministry of Forests and Range
British Columbia. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources
BC Hydro
Forintek Canada Corp.
Date
November 2006
Edition
39695
Material Type
Research report
Field
Bioproducts
energy in BC. As illustrated by the pellet industry, utilization of more wood biomass in cooperation
Contributor
British Columbia. Ministry of Forests and Range
British Columbia. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources
BC Hydro
Forintek Canada Corp.
Date
November 2006
Edition
39695
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 v.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Bioproducts
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Utilization
Renewable natural resources
Biomass
Series Number
W-2980
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Biomass
Renewable natural resources
Utilization
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Biological modification of lignins to high value products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1597
Author
Yu, E.K.C.
Date
March 1986
Edition
38106
Material Type
technical report
Field
Bioproducts
PDF
Ajoutez cet article à votre liste de sélections pour demander le PDF - Add this item to your selection list to request the PDF
Author
Yu, E.K.C.
Date
March 1986
Edition
38106
Material Type
technical report
Physical Description
83 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Bioproducts
Research Area
Biomass Conversion
Subject
Utilization
Ligninolytic
Lignin
Fungi
Biodegradation
Analysis
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 28/85-86
Project no.53-12-209
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
PDF
Ajoutez cet article à votre liste de sélections pour demander le PDF - Add this item to your selection list to request the PDF
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Biomass equipment - Database software: user's guide

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub43151
Author
Favreau, Jean
Date
1986
Material Type
Guide
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Favreau, Jean
Date
1986
Material Type
Guide
Research report
Physical Description
40 p
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Biomass
Equipment
Waste utilization
Series Number
FO Special Report
Language
English
Abstract
Forest residues
PROCESSING
EQUIPMENT
MANUFACTURERS
DATA BASES
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Bondability of beetle-killed lodgepole pine for the manufacture of wood composite products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5605
Author
Feng, Martin
He, G.
Date
January 2006
Edition
37778
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Feng, Martin
He, G.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
January 2006
Edition
37778
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Utilization
Recovery
Pinus contorta
Pinus
Insect killed
Series Number
5156
W-2253
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
To maximize value recovery from post mountain pine beetle - wood (MPB wood) for the manufacture of wood composite products, it is desirable to use completely MPB wood as OSB, MDF or particleboard furnish. The objective of this study in the first fiscal year was to determine and quantify the chemical properties, bondability and wettability of grey stage MPB wood in order to minimize or reduce the impact of beetle-killed wood on composite panel manufacturing. Investigation of the chemical and physical properties of grey stage MPB wood, such as wood pH and buffer capacity, wettability and bondability was conducted. Green lodgepole pine and aspen were used to compare the test results. Various wood furnish derived from MPB wood and green lodgepole pine have been prepared for the manufacturing testing of OSB, MDF and particleboard panels in the next fiscal year. The test results indicated that some basic chemical and physical properties of lodgepole pine, particularly in the sapwood area, had undergone changes associated with MPB infestation. Based on the test results so far, the following conclusions are made: 1. The pH values of both the MPB heartwood and sapwood were lower and their acid and base buffer capacities were higher than those of the green lodgepole pine. As a result, the curing rate of pH sensitive adhesives such as UF and MUF may be affected. 2. MPB sapwood showed extremely fast and high water absorption but its thickness swell was lower than those of the MPB heartwood, green pine sapwood and heartwood regardless of water temperatures. 3. Thickness swell of the MPB sapwood almost reached to the maximum in the first two hours of water soaking at 20°C. 4. The water absorption of sapwood was higher but the thickness swell was lower than that of heartwood in both MPB wood and green lodgepole pine. The rates of water absorption and thickness swell of these woods were fast in the first several hours and slowed down thereafter. 5. Both the MPB heartwood and the green pine heartwood behaved very similarly in terms of water absorption rate and percentages. It appeared that the beetle infestation did not significantly affect the water absorption property of the MPB heartwood. 6. Edge thickness swell and center thickness swell of the MPB sapwood behaved very similarly in terms of the rates and percentages, which were quite different from those of the other woods and suggest that the blue stained MPB sapwood had probably undergone profound changes. 7. Higher temperatures led to faster and more water absorption. The water temperature affected the MPB sapwood more than the MPB heartwood. 8. Thickness swell reached to the equilibrium faster at higher temperatures. 9. Water pH had little influence on water absorption but affected thickness swell. The thickness swell of both MPB wood and lodgepole pine decreased under both acidic and alkaline conditions. 10. The bonding strength of MPB and green lodgepole pine with liquid PF, powdered PF and liquid UF were generally comparable to that of aspen at high press temperatures. Both the MPB wood and green pine showed lower bonding strength than aspen at low press temperatures. This may have significant implications on the bonding quality of the core layer of panels. 11. At high temperature (200°C), green pine produced substantially higher MDI bonding strength while MPB wood and aspen gave lower and similar bonding strength. This was also the case at low press temperature (140ºC), particularly in longer press time. The MDI bonding strength of MPB wood was close to that of aspen under all these press time and temperature conditions. However, aspen appeared to be less sensitive to low press temperature in terms of bonding with MDI. Therefore, green lodgepole pine may be more suitable as a core furnish material than the MPB wood in the manufacture of OSB, where MDI resin is widely used as a core layer adhesive. Grey stage MPB wood may be more suitable as an OSB face furnish material. This hypothesis will be carefully tested in the 2nd fiscal year of this project.
Insect killed wood - Utilization
Insect-killed wood - Recovery
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia - North America
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Carte routière pour l'industrie canadienne des produits à valeur ajoutée en bois

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2517
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Fell, David
Laytner, F.
Date
September 2006
Edition
39103
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Lavoie, P.J.P.
Fell, David
Laytner, F.
Contributor
Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Date
September 2006
Edition
39103
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
176 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Wood
Utilization
Secondary woods
Processing
Markets
Growth
Canada
Series Number
Valeur au bois no FCC 51
5447
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
Le programme Valeur au bois a été mis sur pied en mai 2002 afin de fournir des solutions technologiques aux fabricants de produits du bois à valeur ajoutée de partout au pays. Le volet Recherche du programme a permis de réunir des chercheurs de Forintek Canada Corp., ainsi que de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, de l’Université Laval, de l’Université de Toronto et de l’Université du Nouveau-Brunswick pour examiner les sujets de recherche essentiels au succès à court terme et à long terme de l’industrie. Le volet Transfert de la technologie a contribué à la création d’un réseau pancanadien de spécialistes dans la transformation du bois qui jouent un double rôle. En effet, ils se chargent de diffuser les résultats de recherche et ils aident l’industrie à prendre des décisions d’ordre opérationnel, technique et stratégique. Comme le moment du renouvellement du programme Valeur au bois approche, le SCF a confié à Forintek le mandat de produire une carte routière pour l’industrie canadienne des produits du bois à valeur ajoutée qui permettra d’atteindre quatre grands objectifs :
Déterminer les priorités et les besoins en technologie des sous-secteurs de l’industrie du bois à valeur ajoutée pour les cinq à dix prochaines années;
Trouver des moyens appropriés pour transférer les résultats des recherches à l’industrie;
Définir les objectifs et les mesures de succès des activités de recherche et de transfert de la technologie;
Formuler des recommandations et dresser un plan d’action pour favoriser l’expansion de l’industrie du bois à valeur ajoutée. La carte routière portait sur des domaines de recherche ciblés prenant en considération que les produits à valeur ajoutée se trouvent dans le vaste contexte des chaînes de valeur industrielles. Des questions telles que l’approvisionnement en matériaux, la conception et la mise au point de produits, la technologie et la fabrication, les renseignements sur les marchés et l’accès à ceux-ci, les compétences et la formation, ainsi que de nombreux autres sujets ont été examinées. Six sous-secteurs de l’industrie des produits d’apparence ont été ciblés dans la carte routière : les portes et fenêtres, les revêtements de sol, les meubles de maison, les meubles de bureau, les armoires et comptoirs de cuisine, ainsi que les menuiseries préfabriquées et les menuiseries architecturales. Les produits du bois d’ingénierie et les pièces de charpentes préfabriquées entraient dans la catégorie des produits structuraux. L’information recueillie pour constituer la carte routière a été fournie par plus de cent spécialistes et représentants de l’industrie, surtout dans le cadre d’interviews en personne. Des rencontres individuelles ont été organisées avec des acteurs clés de l’industrie afin : a) de bien comprendre les tendances et les dynamiques intrinsèques qui animent chaque secteur; b) de définir les besoins en recherche et les priorités de l’industrie. Des représentants des partenaires du milieu universitaire ont été invités à passer en revue le résumé des questions issues de la consultation de l’industrie et ont participé à une discussion en table ronde en vue de dégager et d’évaluer des stratégies pour satisfaire les besoins de l’industrie. Il ressort des consultations de l’industrie que le secteur des produits du bois d’apparence et des pièces de charpentes doit faire l’objet d’innovation pour être en mesure de réagir à un certain nombre d’éléments moteurs clés.
Canadian woods - Utilization
Industrial growth - Canada
Secondary wood processing - Markets
Technology forecasting
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143 records – page 1 of 15.