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109 records – page 1 of 11.

Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5602
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
of wood consuming value-added sectors. * Marketed as structural lumber in the SPF (spruce-pine-fir
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37756
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
36 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
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Amélioration du rendement en valeur des opérations de récolte de feuillus tolérants

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3286
Author
Hamilton, Peter
Date
September 2012
Edition
39949
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
, 2009. Value-added Merchandising/ Concentration Center(s) Background Data. Aubichon consulting
Author
Hamilton, Peter
Date
September 2012
Edition
39949
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Veneer
Value added
Sorting
Recovery
Logs
Hardwoods
Hardwood iniative
Iniative feuillis
Advantage
Series Number
Avantage ; Vol. 13, No. 5
Language
French
Abstract
Les forêts de feuillus tolérants fournissent une vaste gamme de produits, notamment des billes dont la valeur varie de 45 à 1700 $/m3. L'utilisaton de modèles de production convenant aux produits de commodité ne maximise pas la valeur qu'on peut tirer de ce type de forêt.
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An evaluation of the detection capacity of automated defect detection systems

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub42284
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
July 2004
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Rancourt, V.
Date
July 2004
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
85 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Lumber
Value added
Manufacturing
Series Number
General Revenue
E-3923
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
The market for hardwood component production is currently affected by low-cost components importation from Asia. Industrial automation is an actual option for the secondary manufacturing industry to counter this situation. Integrating a defect detection system is a complex process and selecting the right system is even more complicated. This study proposes an approach for assessing the defect detection capabilities of different systems as well as a decision support tool to guide the producer toward the adequate equipment. The study is limited to assessing defect detection capacities; the overall system performance, the optimization software and the cutting equipment are not analyzed. Understanding the origin and characteristics of defects to be detected and the capacities and theoretical limits of vision technology are prerequisites. A sampling with defects that, due to properties such as their small size, are hard to detect, is assessed by each system and the results are compared. To date, the assessed systems are not capable of detecting all defects pertaining to hardwood component production. A decision support tool will make it possible to methodically select the equipment most appropriate to the producer’s needs and leads to an enlightened decision in terms of the producer’s priorities and expectations.
Defects - Detection
Lumber
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Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5593
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
of wood consuming value-added sectors. * Marketed as structural lumber in the SPF (spruce-pine-fir
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37747
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
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Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5594
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
of wood consuming value-added sectors. c o m m o n u s e s c o m m e r c i A l A vA i l A b i l i
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37748
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
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Benefits of including surface defect information in edger and trimmer optimization

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1292
Author
Orbay, L.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37768
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Orbay, L.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37768
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Digitalization
Subject
Value added
Trimming
Surface properties
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Optimization
Series Number
W-2223
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The objective of this project was to quantify the lumber value recovery up-lift that is achievable by adding surface defect detection to board profile scanning in sawmill edger optimization. Optimized profile edging solutions of 194 spruce-pine-fir sample boards were compared to optimized edging solutions that took into account surface defects as well as the geometric shape of the board. The edger optimization improvement was found to be marginal. Data analysis showed a benefit of only $0.13 per m3 of processed logs, an equivalent of $237.11 per shift. The findings of this report are mill specific. The value recovery figures were collected in a mill with given log supply, machinery and market orientation. A more significant up-lift in value recovery would likely be obtained for higher valued products produced from larger logs typically processed in coastal sawmills.
Edging Optimization
Trimming Optimization
Surface quality
Value recovery
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Bioenergie La Tuque (BELT) project summary (public version)

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub8060
Author
Mehr, Nima Ghavidel
Gilani, Banafsheh
Rezaei, Hooman
Robinson, Travis
Volpé, Sylvain
Date
April 2021
Edition
48830
Material Type
Research report
Field
Bioproducts
Author
Mehr, Nima Ghavidel
Gilani, Banafsheh
Rezaei, Hooman
Robinson, Travis
Volpé, Sylvain
Date
April 2021
Edition
48830
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
21 p.
Sector
Pulp Paper and Bioproducts
Field
Bioproducts
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Renewable natural resources
Biomass
Energy
Value added
Markets
Conversion factors
Pyrolysis
Series Number
Technical Report; TR 2021 N29
Language
English
Abstract
Bioenergie La Tuque (BELT) has targeted the production of renewable liquid hydrocarbon fuels (mostly diesel and aviation fuel) from forestry residues. The production of this type of biofuel is an important and necessary factor enabling Canada to meet its greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Its importance rests on the potential inherent in the utilization of abundant and sustainable lignocellulosic feedstock, which does not compete with food as well as its complete compatibility with existing transportation fuel markets. BELT’s technology assessment team employed a systematic approach to identify mature technologies with the potential to meet the needs of BELT’s proposed biorefinery. A stepwise approach was used to sift through a wide range of biomass conversion technologies. The first fourteen (14) technologies were selected from a list of over 600 technologies by eliminating those that were not appropriate for the required conversion, lacked the necessary technological maturity, or were defunct.
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Black spruce : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5595
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Field
Sustainable Construction
” series characterizing the technical and market demands of wood consuming value-added sectors
Author
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Contributor
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Edition
37749
Material Type
Pamphlet
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Market Analysis
Subject
Alberta
Picea
Value added
Series Number
Facts on wood series
W-2189E
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The distribution range of black spruce encompasses the entire width of North America, stretching from Newfoundland to Alaska. In Alberta, it is commonly found in poorly drained muskeg areas of northern and central regions of the province. Its distribution is sparse and/or absent on very dry sites where its common associate is jack pine. Within the upper foothills of the province, black spruce can be found with lodgepole pine, white spruce and balsam poplar. While pure stands of black spruce are common at the northern and northwestern limits of its growing range, it is also found in mixed stands of white birch, trembling aspen, white spruce and tamarack. The tree often has a characteristic cluster of branches at the top, framing a club or crowsnest. Considered one of the smallest of the eastern spruces, black spruce is a slow growing species reaching 9 to 15 metres in height and 15 to 30 cm in diameter. In areas with well-drained mineral soils, it can attain heights of 25 to 30 metres, however, swamp grown trees 200 years old may be only 5 to 15 cm in diameter. At the national inventory level, black spruce is grouped with red spruce and accounts for approximately 12% of Canada’s total softwood inventory, and 9% of the total national forest inventory. In Alberta, black spruce accounts for 130 million cubic metres or 15% of the province’s spruce inventory. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Picea mariana
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Canadian value added sector survey

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub2791
Author
Julien, F.
Date
February 2012
Edition
39415
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Julien, F.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
February 2012
Edition
39415
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
23 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Value added
Surveys
Secondary manufacturing
Canada
Series Number
Value to Wood No. 201005269
Project No. FPI-11-19
E-4761
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
A Roadmap for the Canadian Value Added Wood Products Industry and the Prefabricated Building Systems Industry was completed in 2007 under the Value to Wood Program. Current information is needed to confirm actual industry’s needs for innovation. The project consisted in conducting a Value Added Sector Assessment Survey to update the previous Roadmap. Information and data were essentially collected through the use of an online interactive survey prepared by the FPInnovations’ economics and markets group. A total of 2,086 industry and research people were contacted to complete the questionnaire. Of that total, 256 respondents returned questionnaires which were kept for analysis. The study has reviewed the research issues and needs raised by industry respondents. These issues and needs were analyzed and sorted in different themes and then compared to the findings of the 2007 roadmap. The conclusions of the study are notably:
The driving forces of innovation identified in 2007 are still relevant and valid today o Global competition and consumers needs are the main driving forces leading businesses to seek greater manufacturing and cost efficiencies.
The priorities and research needs identified in the 2007 Roadmap are still pertinent today o There is a need to increase product development capacities through better design, better finishing, better quality, etc. o Provide relevant and up to date market intelligence information to support the value added sectors.
Value added - Canada
Secondary manufacturing
Market surveys
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Caractéristiques de finition extérieure des bois canadiens

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5283
Author
Groves, C. Kevin
Gignac, Manon
Date
March 2002
Edition
42153
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Groves, C. Kevin
Gignac, Manon
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2002
Edition
42153
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Finishing
Value added
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service Value-Added Report
E-3699
Location
Sainte-Foy, Québec
Language
French
Abstract
Finishes - Exterior
Board products - Finishing
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109 records – page 1 of 11.