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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Development of a new process for the manufacture of added-value glued wood veneer products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37496
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Clarke, Michael Raymond
Date
April 1990
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Clarke, Michael Raymond
Contributor
Science Council of British Columbia.
Date
April 1990
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
30 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer gluing
Veneer
Phenols
Laminate product
Gluing
Glue
Series Number
W-1577
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The new technologies, incising, moisture tolerant phenolic adhesives and steam pressing were evaluated for the manufacture of laminated veneer lumber (LVL). Both 8- and 13-ply incised spruce LVL panels were prepared using these new technologies. The results showed that both steam pressing and self-generated steam from wet face and back veneers accelerated temperature rise in the innermost glueline of 13-ply incised spruce LVL panels. This would help facilitate faster production rates for LVL manufacture. Bond quality and edge bending values were determined for the steam-pressed 8-ply and 13-ply incised spruce LVL panels. In all cases the average % wood failure was above 90% indicating excellent adhesion between the moisture tolerant adhesive and wood. The modulus of rupture and modulus of elasticity values measured for the steam-pressed incised spruce LVL samples compared very favourably with those for a commercial Norway spruce 15-ply LVL product.
Veneers - Gluing
Veneers - Incising
Lumber, Laminated veneer
Glue, Phenolic
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Development of pressing strategies for veneer panel products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37334
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1994
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 1994
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer manufacturing
Veneer
Pressing
Plywood manufacture
Plywood
Panels
Laminate product
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 23
Contract no. 1812L010
W-1093
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A series of plywood and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) panels were prepared using veneers with higher than normal moisture contents in face and back layers. The purpose of the work was to evaluate the effects of self-generated steam on the pressing times and panel warpage. Panels made with 6% and 10% m.c. faces and backs were compared with control panels made with all dry veneer. Thirteen- ply 40 mm (1 5/8 inch) thick panels were evaluated for press times and thin 9.5 mm (3/8 inch) panels were evaluated for cupping and bowing. Normal plywood press temperatures and adhesives were used. All panels were made with incised 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) SPF veneers. The project demonstrated that substantially shorter press times and more dimensionally stable panels can potentially be made using higher moisture content outside veneers.
Lumber, Laminated veneer - Pressing
Lumber, Laminated veneer - Manufacture
Veneers - Pressing
Veneers - Manufacture
Plywood - Panels - Pressing
Plywood - Manufacture
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Development of pressing strategies for veneer panel products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37386
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Troughton, G.E.
Date
March 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Troughton, G.E.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
19 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer manufacturing
Veneer
Pressing
Plywood manufacture
Plywood
Panels
Laminate product
Series Number
Canadian Forest Service No. 21
Contract no. 1812L010
W-1223
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
A series of plywood and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) panels were prepared using incised veneers in the second phase of this two year project. The primary purpose of the work was to evaluate the effects of steam injection on the pressing times. A secondary objective was to expand the study of warpage in three-ply and four-ply plywood which was begun in phase one. Thirteen-ply 40 mm (1 5/8 inch) thick panels were evaluated for press times and thin 9.5 mm (3/8 inch) and 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) panels were evaluated for cupping and bowing. Press temperatures of 150 degrees C, 175 degrees C and 204 degrees C were used with a commercial adhesive mix for the LVL study while normal plywood pressing conditions were used for the plywood. For the plywood warpage study, the effect of lathe check orientation and species mix were evaluated. The lathe check orientation had little effect while the surface veneer species had a pronounced effect on the warpage in the plywood. Steam used for injection was heated to 260 degrees C at 450 KPa (65 psi) with a super-heater. All panels were made with incised 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) SPF veneers. The project demonstrated that steam injection can shorten press times by fifty percent if incised veneers are used.
Lumber, Laminated veneer - Pressing
Lumber, Laminated veneer - Manufacture
Veneers - Pressing
Veneers - Manufacture
Plywood - Panels - Pressing
Plywood - Manufacture
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Evaluation of radio frequency/vacuum drying for veneer

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37373
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1995
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1995
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
16 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer drying
Veneer
Vacuum drying
Vacuum
Seasoning vacuum drying
Seasoning high frequency
Seasoning
Drying
Series Number
W-1195
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Six trials were conducted at the Department of Wood Science, UBC on the drying of "redry" and green SPF veneer using a 0.3 m3 laboratory Radio Frequency/Vacuum (RF/V) apparatus. A larger scale trial was conducted at Canfor's Eburne mill, on the drying of "redry" SPF veneer using a 60 m3 pilot plant apparatus. Results from all these trials showed there was a wide variation in the final moisture content (m.c.) of the veneers with many veneers showing low m.c. regions. This m.c. variation could pose problems for bonding with moisture tolerant phenolic adhesives. Results from the Eburne RF/V trial showed there was a species effect in drying rates and subalpine fir veneer dried at a faster rate than spruce veneer using radio frequency heating.
Seasoning - Vacuum drying
Seasoning - High frequency
Veneers - Drying
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Evaluation of steam press drying of veneers

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37347
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Troughton, G.E.
Date
March 1994
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Troughton, G.E.
Date
March 1994
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer drying
Veneer
Steam
Seasoning steam
Seasoning
Press drying
Plywood manufacture
Plywood
Drying
Series Number
W-1103
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Steam press drying of green SPF veneers was evaluated on a 4 x 8 foot prototype steam press set up at a local plywood mill. A used industrial press has been modified into a single opening oil heated hot press with grooves machined into the upper platen. Standard green nominal 4 x 8 foot 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) thick mill veneer was dried with super-heated steam injected through 6 mm (1/4 inch) holes in the bottom platen. All veneers were incised with Forintek's patented veneer incisor. The project demonstrated that steam injection can dry green veneers three to four times faster than conventional veneer driers. From the results of this project, a study on the press drying of redry veneer was initiated and showed good potential for industrial implementation.
Veneers - Drying - Tests
Seasoning - Steam
Seasoning - Press drying
Plywood - Manufacture
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Evaluation of wood properties from the forest resource

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37237
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Walser, D.C.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1991
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Troughton, G.E.
Walser, D.C.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1991
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
53 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer
Laminate product
Series Number
Forestry Canada No. 35;1812L007
W-843
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Unseasoned spruce heart veneer was incised and steam-press dried using platen pressures of 25, 100 and 200 psi. Three-ply plywood panels were then prepared from these densified veneers. Results showed that the stiffness values for laminated veneer lumber (LVL) made with low stiffness SPF veneer or combinations of SPF and Douglas-fir veneer can be greatly increased and meet the 2,000,000 psi MOE marketing requirement using two methods. One involves impregnating unseasoned SPF veneer with phenolic resin and the second method involves using a special lay-up of the SPF and Douglas-fir veneers. These results will greatly help in marketing LVL using western veneer species. New technology of incising, moisture tolerant adhesives and self-generated steam developed at Forintek substantially reduced pressing time by about 40% which will make the manufacture of LVL more economical.
Lumber, Laminated veneer
Modified woods
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Fire-resistance of timber-concrete composite floor using laminated veneer lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40133
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Date
April 2016
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
FPInnovations Fire-Resistance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floor using Laminated Veneer Lumber
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
April 2016
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Fire
Resistance
Structural composites
Wood
Concrete
Laminate product
Veneer
Floors
Series Number
E-4960
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
There is a need to demonstrate how novel timber-concrete composite floors can span long distances and be a practical alternative to other traditional structural systems. Better understanding of the fire behaviour of these hybrid systems is essential. To achieve this, the fire-resistance of a timber-concrete composite floor assembly, using BC wood products, will be evaluated in accordance with CAN/ULC-S101 [2]. A 2 hr fire resistance rating will be targeted, as this is the current requirement in high-rise buildings for floor separations between occupancies. The structural behaviour of this type of system will also be assessed from conducting pull-out tests of the shear connectors. In conjunction with previous test data, the results of this test will be used to develop an analytical model to assess the structural and fire-resistance of timber-concrete composite floors. 301010618
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Investigation of flatwise and edgewise bending properties of laminated veneer lumber tested parallel to grain

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5494
Author
Palka, L.C.
Stroh, L.
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1991
Edition
37256
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Palka, L.C.
Stroh, L.
Troughton, G.E.
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1991
Edition
37256
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer
Mechanical properties
Sample
Laminate product
Series Number
W-873
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine flatwise and edgewise bending strength ("MOR") and stiffness ("MOE") of spruce and pine 1.5-inch by 3.5-inch by 48-inch laminated veneer lumber ("LVL") specimens parallel to grain. The experimental spruce and pine data was pooled together to give a combined spruce-pine data set.
Appendix 1 to Forestry Canada No. 35, Contract no. 1812L007 on lumber and laminated veneer strength.
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Laminating Canadian wood species : CFS value added research program progress report to March 31, 1999

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37511
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Author
Andersen, Axel W.
Contributor
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
1 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Veneer
Laminate product
Glue
Canada
Series Number
W-1604
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
The project objective is to provide key data on the laminating properties of Canadian wood species to assist the secondary manufacturing industry to meet domestic and international customer expectations. This is a progress report to March 31, 1999.
Lumber, Laminated veneer
Laminated products - Canada
Glue - Tests
Documents
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Minimizing glue dry-out and delamination in plywood. Part 1: softwood plywood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub37853
Author
Xu, H.
Dai, Chunping
Chow, Gordon
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
October 2007
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Xu, H.
Dai, Chunping
Chow, Gordon
Andersen, Axel W.
Date
October 2007
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
46 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer gluing
Veneer
Plywood manufacture
Plywood
Laminate product
Gluing
Series Number
4574
W-2461
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
This work provides scientific support for, and confirms, what most mills already use as rough and dirty rules of thumb as best practices for manufacturing plywood: i.e. dry veneer should be pressed when its temperature is 100°F or less; average veneer moisture can be 4 %; assembly times should not exceed 20 minutes; and glue spreads should be approximately 32 lbs. per M ft2 SGL. In addition, this report used the data generated to formulate multivariate statistical models that could be used to develop or enhance existing in-mill process control software, and/or quality procedures at member operations. This report documents the results of an extensive investigation of plywood dryout and delamination. The study included laboratory and mill tests of key manufacturing variables used in the production of phenol formaldehyde (PF) bonded plywood. Relationships between key variables and plywood quality were used to develop a statistical equation to quantify the effect of veneer moisture content, temperature, assembly time and glue spread rate on wood failure percentage. Testing methods using vacuum/pressure boil-dry-boil, and 6-cycle soak were used and a new multi-step pressing schedule was examined. The following are the main findings:
Veneer with a low moisture content (MC) level is more likely to create glueline dryout than high MC sheets when PF resin is used. Although veneer with a high MC level could minimize the occurrence of dryout, PF gluing systems accept a maximum allowable veneer MC (peak moisture) range of 6 to 8%.
Sheets having temperatures over 100°F are strongly correlated with dryout problems.
An excessively long assembly time approaching 20+ minutes could significantly affect bonding, especially when veneer or ambient temperatures are high.
Increasing glue spread rate can be used to minimize dryout caused by high veneer temperature and low veneer MC; however, a higher glue cost per M ft2 is incurred.
Flexure tests cannot be relied upon to detect bond quality as bending strength is heavily influenced by surface panel properties. During the mill study, it was learned that variations within each of the above mentioned controllable factors could not be avoided in a mill situation. Good manufacturing process control can ensure that all variables stay within ideal ranges and occurrences of dryout are minimized. The statistical models developed during this project could, possibly, be used to develop or enhance process control software. A multiple-step hot-pressing schedule, capable of improving plywood bonding properties with or without sacrificing volume recovery, was developed to minimize bond problems caused by dryout. Existing mill presses may be able to implement this approach seamlessly or after a few minor adjustments have been made. Some mills may have to peel thicker veneer to compensate for increased veneer compression associated with multi pressing and in doing so sacrifice log recovery. Pressing schedules illustrated in this study indicate that press production is not sacrificed as single or multi-step pressing time is identical for most thicknesses. Laboratory tests showed that wood failure percentage figures from a glueline shear test, a standard method for evaluating bond quality, are useful glue dry-out indicators for softwood plywood. An attempt to develop a tack strength test that could assist in evaluating dryout was unsuccessful as excessive variation was present within recorded data.
Veneers - Gluing
Lumber, Laminated veneer - Gluing
Plywood - Manufacture
Documents
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15 records – page 1 of 2.