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Effect of veneer incising on strength properties of Douglas-fir LVL/plywood products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub5559
Author
Wang, Brad J.
Chan, K.L.
Date
May 2001
Edition
37576
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Author
Wang, Brad J.
Chan, K.L.
Date
May 2001
Edition
37576
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Veneer
Mechanical properties
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pseudotsuga
Plywood manufacture
Plywood
Laminate product
Series Number
W-1764
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia
Language
English
Abstract
Veneer incising at the peeling lathe, a new technology developed at Forintek, has been increasingly applied in Canadian softwood plywood mills. Significant benefits include reducing veneer curl-up and spin-outs and increasing veneer recovery. However, a comprehensive study of the effect of veneer incising on the conventional hot-pressing process has not been undertaken so far. As part of the work on optimization of LVL/plywood hot pressing process, this report investigated the effect of veneer incising on the strength properties of Douglas-fir LVL/Plywood products. Lightly-incised Douglas-fir veneer peeled with a Forintek mini-lathe was used in comparison to non-incised Douglas-fir veneer. The three veneer moisture levels considered were 0%, 3% and 6%. The number of plies for plywood and LVL panels were 5 and 13, respectively. A mixed-level experimental design was employed. Using a statistical software program, JMP, the importance of factors affecting Douglas-fir LVL/plywood hot-pressing and strength properties were identified. Also the t-test was used to test the significance of the difference in panel mean strength. The results showed that: 1. For Douglas-fir species, the lightly-incised veneer (similar to that now used at mills) does not significantly affect the conventional hot pressing times for 1) 5-ply plywood panels if the target core temperature is 115 0C and 2) 13-ply LVL if the target core temperature is 105 0C, compared to non-incised veneer. The hot-pressing time increases with increase in veneer moisture content ranging from 0 to 6% for 5-ply plywood. 2. For Douglas-fir veneer, no occurrences of blows were observed after unloading the press even with 5-ply plywood panels at 6% veneer moisture content. Under the same conditions, the compression ratios of 5-ply plywood and 13-ply LVL using the lightly-incised veneer are slightly larger compared to non-incised veneer. Also higher moisture veneer results in higher panel compression ratio. 3. For 5-ply Douglas-fir plywood, there are no significant differences in plywood bending MOE and shear strength (lap-shear) between non-incised and lightly-incised veneer at either 0% or 3% veneer moisture content. However, at 6% veneer moisture content, the differences in mean plywood bending MOE and shear strength between non-incised veneer and lightly-incised veneer were identified significant; the mean bending MOE of 5-ply plywood using the lightly-incised veneer is about 10% higher compared to the non-incised veneer; on the contrary, the shear strength (lap-shear) of 5-ply plywood using the lightly-incised veneer is about 20% lower compared to the non-incised veneer. On a statistical basis, there is no significant difference in plywood mean bending MOR between non-incised veneer and lightly-incised veneer at each of the three moisture content levels. 4. For 13-ply Douglas-fir LVL, there is no statistical difference in edgewise bending MOE and MOR between the incised veneer and non-incised veneer at 3% veneer moisture content. Based on the limited number of replicates, the block shear strength through-the-thickness using the lightly-incised veneer is found to be approximately 10% higher compared to the non-incised veneer and this difference is found to be significant on a statistical basis. But the difference in block shear strengths parallel to grain between the incised veneer and non-incised veneer is not significantly different.
Veneers - Incising
Plywood - Manufacture
Lumber, Laminated veneer - Manufacture
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Strength
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Fire-resistance of timber-concrete composite floor using laminated veneer lumber

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40133
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Date
April 2016
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
FPInnovations Fire-Resistance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floor using Laminated Veneer Lumber
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
April 2016
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
28 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Fire
Resistance
Structural composites
Wood
Concrete
Laminate product
Veneer
Floors
Series Number
E-4960
Location
Québec, Québec
Language
English
Abstract
There is a need to demonstrate how novel timber-concrete composite floors can span long distances and be a practical alternative to other traditional structural systems. Better understanding of the fire behaviour of these hybrid systems is essential. To achieve this, the fire-resistance of a timber-concrete composite floor assembly, using BC wood products, will be evaluated in accordance with CAN/ULC-S101 [2]. A 2 hr fire resistance rating will be targeted, as this is the current requirement in high-rise buildings for floor separations between occupancies. The structural behaviour of this type of system will also be assessed from conducting pull-out tests of the shear connectors. In conjunction with previous test data, the results of this test will be used to develop an analytical model to assess the structural and fire-resistance of timber-concrete composite floors. 301010618
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