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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Alternative uses of post-harvest woody debris biomass

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49507
Author
Ristea, Catalin
Date
March 2017
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Ristea, Catalin
Date
March 2017
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
13 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Harvesting
Logging
Fire
Biomass
Wildlife
Energy
FPI TR
Series Number
Technical Report ; TR 2017 n.56
Language
English
Abstract
Current forest management policy in many jurisdictions in North America manages excess woody debris by piling and burning it, mainly as a post-harvest fire hazard abatement obligation. This study highlights three key points to consider regarding utilization and disposal of waste wood piles: 1) Allocate most woody debris waste to the biofuels sector in a cost-effective manner; 2) Allocate a small portion of woody debris (e.g. 10-15%) to implement windrow habitats where necessary to maintain mammalian biodiversity on clearcuts; 3) Limit burning of waste wood to those sites near human activity (potential fire hazard) that do not have an opportunity for biofuels or windrow purposes.
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Compendium of watershed restoration activities, techniques and trials in Western Canada

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36678
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Gillies, Clayton
Sutherland, Brad
Date
March 1997
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
debris were positioned on slopes to serve as wildlife perches. • deteriorated culverts were removed
Author
Kosicki, Kris
Gillies, Clayton
Sutherland, Brad
Date
March 1997
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
339 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Drainage
Harvesting
Fishes
Forest roads
Landslides
Roads
Sediment control
Stream management
Wildlife
Watershed
Water
Stream
Riparian zones
Research
Renewable natural resources
Operations
Canada
Series Number
FERIC Special Report ; SR-000119
Language
English
Abstract
Forest managers in western Canada are now treating old forest roads and harvested sites to mitigate environmental concerns. This Compendium has been developed to assist practitioners in western Canada in selecting and implementing restoration measures appropriate to their needs and conditions. Watershed restoration activities, techniques and research trials in western North America are described and contacts for further information are given. Additions to the Compendium will be made on an ongoing basis.
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Cost and productivity of alternative harvesting in B.C.’s interior wet-belt designed to maintain caribou habitat

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36829
Author
Phillips, Eric
Date
March 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
, Wildlife habitat, Caribou, Tree damage, Old-growth forests, Harvesting, Costs, Interior British Columbia
Author
Phillips, Eric
Date
March 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wildlife
Tree damage
Trees
Sampling
Selection
Harvesting
Growth
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 11, No. 27
Language
English
Abstract
This report documents the costs and productivities of group-selection harvesting of one-third of a stand in an old-growth cedar–hemlock forest in the interior wet-belt of British Columbia while preserving caribou habitat values. The group-selection harvesting was compared to clearcut and single-tree selection treatments. Harvesting costs were strongly influenced by the merchantability of the harvested stems and the criteria for selecting trees to be harvested. The single-tree selection had the lowest cost because of the selection criteria and merchantability while the group selection had the highest cost. The group selection treatment’s harvesting costs were about 22% greater than for the clearcut treatment.
Group selection
Single-tree selection
Clearcutting
Wildlife habitat
Caribou
Tree damage
Old-growth forests
Harvesting
Costs
Interior British Columbia
Cedar
Hemlock
Lichen
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Costs and benefits of seven post-harvest debris treatments in Alberta’s forests

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36826
Author
Baxter, Greg
Date
February 2010
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
and benefits. We examined four factors in this study: potential fire behaviour, wildlife suitability
Author
Baxter, Greg
Date
February 2010
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wildlife
Treatment
Sites
Regeneration
Harvesting
Costs
Alberta
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 11, No. 24
Language
English
Abstract
We surveyed fire behaviour experts and wildlife biologists to rank the importance of four factors that affect the costs and benefits of seven post-harvest debris treatments and to determine the overall costs of each treatment to the forest industry and Alberta’s government. The four factors are fire behaviour potential, wildlife suitability, regeneration capability, and treatment costs.
Fire behaviour
Post-harvest site assessment
Post-harvest treatment
Wildlife habitat
Regeneration
Piling
Burning
Chipping
Debris disposal
Debris management
Alberta
Costs
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Feasibility of harvesting timber from small canopy openings in wetbelt Douglas-fir stands

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub40459
Author
Mitchell, Janet L.
Date
June 2000
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Mitchell, Janet L.
Date
June 2000
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
12 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wildlife
Productivity
Openings
Harvesting
Costs
British Columbia
Advantage
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 1, No. 2
Language
English
Abstract
In 1997, the Cariboo Forest Region of the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, in co-operation with the Williams Lake Division of Weldwood of Canada Limited, carried out a study to examine how harvesting trees from several small openings within a block affects mule deer winter habitat. FERIC monitored the harvesting component of the project, and compared the productivities and costs of working in canopy openings of different sizes.
Harvesting
Environmental aspects
Canopy openings
Douglas fir
Wildlife habitat
Mule deer
Productivity
Costs
British Columbia
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Harvesting with residual blocks or leave strips: an economic comparison

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36698
Author
Gingras, Jean-François
Date
August 1996
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Gingras, Jean-François
Date
August 1996
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
8 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wildlife
Residues
Harvesting
Costs
Series Number
Technical Note ; TN-000263
Language
English
Abstract
From the perspective of improving habitat quality for wildlife, harvesting (clearcutting) with residual blocks represents an alternative to large-area clearcuts, in which the harvested areas are separated by narrow leave strips of standing timber. In 1997, Quebec's Ministry of Natural Resources and Ministry of the Environment and Wildlife cooperated with Donohue Inc. and FERIC in a study that is comparing the economic impacts and wildlife utilization for the two harvest scenarios. This Technical Note describes the results of a comparative analysis of harvesting costs for the two approaches, and demonstrates that over a 30-year horizon, the approach with residual blocks averaged approximately $0.45 to $0.67 per m3 more expensive on an annual basis (0ver a 30-year period) than the current practice of using leave strips.
Harvesting
RESIDUAL BLOCKS
Wildlife conservation
Environmental aspects
Economic aspects
Costs
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Partial cutting to improve winter mule deer habitat: a short-term observation of skidding

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub36778
Author
Evans, Craig
Date
1999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
decade, more and more forest land has been set aside for non-forestry values ranging from wildlife
Author
Evans, Craig
Date
1999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
2 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Wildlife
Systems
Skidding
Partial cutting
British Columbia
Series Number
Field Note ; Partial Cutting-FN-000025
Language
English
Abstract
Partial cutting systems
Skidding
Wildlife habitats
Mule deer
Environmental aspects
British Columbia
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7 records – page 1 of 1.