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665 records – page 1 of 67.

Ability of three harvesting systems to limit rutting on a clay site

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub3839
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Date
February 2002
Edition
40558
Material Type
Research report
Field
Fibre Supply
Author
Plamondon, Jean A.
Date
February 2002
Edition
40558
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
4 p.
Sector
Forest Operations
Field
Fibre Supply
Research Area
Forestry
Subject
Tree lengths
Trees
Systems
Stroke delimbers
Soil
Skidders
Short wood
Rutting
Processors
Harvesting
Advantage
Soft soil
Series Number
Advantage ; Vol. 2, No. 46
Language
English
Abstract
FERIC compared three harvesting systems (full-tree, tree-length, and cut-to length) on a clay site in northwestern Québec. None of the systems limited rutting to below the acceptable target level; however, cut-to-length harvesting (using a three-machine system) showed slightly better results than the other two systems.
Full-tree harvesting
Tree-length systems
Cut-to-length harvesting systems
Rutting
Ground disturbance
Clay soils
Feller bunchers
Stroke delimbers
Processors
Shortwood forwarders
Grapple skidders
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Accelerated durability testing of wood-base fiber and particle panel materials

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub1494
Author
Unligil, H.H.
Date
March 1982
Edition
37999
Material Type
Research report
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
S <33 < pd ^ ACCELERATED DURABILITY TESTING OF WOOD-BASE FIBER AND PARTICLE PANEL MATERIALS
Author
Unligil, H.H.
Date
March 1982
Edition
37999
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
7 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Research Area
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Subject
Wood
Panels
Materials
Series Number
CFS/DSS project no 12/81-82
3-65-57-016
E-23
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Language
English
Abstract
Composite materials - Durability
Wood-based panels
Wood-based panels - Durability
Wood Based Composites
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Advanced methods of encapsulation

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub6091
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, A.
Date
November 2016
Edition
44220
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
.............................................................................................. 35 6.2 Temperature Profiles in Wood
Author
Osborne, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, A.
Contributor
Forestry Innovation Investment
Date
November 2016
Edition
44220
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
66 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Building Systems
Subject
Building construction
Wood frame
Design
Fire
Series Number
W-3261
Language
English
Abstract
Neither the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) [1], nor any provincial code, such as the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC) [2], currently provide “acceptable solutions” to permit the construction of tall wood buildings, that is buildings of 7 stories and above. British Columbia, however, was the first province in Canada to allow mid-rise (5/6 storey) wood construction and other provinces have since followed. As more mid-rise wood buildings are erected, their benefits are becoming apparent to the industry, and therefore they are gaining popularity and becoming more desirable. Forest product research has now begun to shift towards more substantial buildings, particularly in terms of height. High-rise buildings, typically taller than 6 storeys, are currently required to achieve 2 h fire resistance ratings (FRR) for floors and other structural elements, and need to be of non-combustible construction, as per the “acceptable solutions” of Division B of the NBCC [1]. In order for a tall wood building to be approved, it must follow an “alternative solution” approach, which requires demonstrating that the design provides an equivalent or greater level of safety as compared to an accepted solution using non-combustible construction. One method to achieve this level of safety is by ‘encapsulating’ the assembly to provide additional protection before wood elements become involved in the fire, as intended by the Code objectives and functional statements (i.e., prolong the time before the wood elements potentially start to char and their structural capacity is affected). It is also necessary to demonstrate that the assembly, in particular the interior finishes, conform to any necessary flame spread requirements. The Technical Guide for the Design and Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada [3] recommends designing a tall wood building so that it is code-conforming in all respects, except that it employs mass timber construction. The guide presents various encapsulation methods, from full encapsulation of all wood elements to partial protection of select elements. National Research Council Canada (NRC), FPInnovations, and the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) began specifically investigating encapsulation techniques during their Mid-Rise Wood Buildings Consortium research project, and demonstrated that direct applied gypsum board, cement board and gypsum-concrete can delay the effects of fire on a wood substrate [4]. There is extensive data on the use of gypsum board as a means of encapsulation for wood-frame assemblies and cold-formed steel assemblies. However, tall wood buildings are more likely to employ mass timber elements due to higher load conditions, requirements for longer fire resistance ratings, as well as other factors. There is little knowledge currently available related to using gypsum board directly applied to mass timber, or in other configurations, for fire protection. Testing performed to date has been limited to direct applied Type X gypsum board using standard screw spacing, and showed promising results [5, 6, 7]. This represents an opportunity for other configurations that might provide enhanced protection of wood elements to be investigated. Being able to provide equivalent fire performance of assemblies between non-combustible and combustible construction will thus improve the competiveness of tall timber buildings by providing additional options for designers.
Revision of March 2015 edition
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: acoustic performance of innovative composite wood stud partition walls

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49838
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Deng, James
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
FPInnovations Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Acoustic
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Deng, James
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
25 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Vibration
Design
Walls
Studs
Language
English
Abstract
Airborne sound insulation performance of wall assemblies is a critical aspect which is directly associated with the comfort level of the occupants, which in turn affects the market acceptance.
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: exit fire separations in mid-rise Wood buildings

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49853
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Service Canadien des Forêts Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid- Rise and High-Rise Construction
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
91 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Fire
Building code
Residential construction
Language
English
Abstract
In 2015, the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) [1] adopted prescriptive provisions to allow the construction of mid-rise (5- and 6-storey) buildings using combustible construction. These types of buildings were already permitted under the British Columbia Building Code, as of 2009 [2]. In2014 the Province of Ontario filed an amendment to also allow mid-rise wood buildings, however, it required that the exit fire separations be built using noncombustible construction having a fire resistance rating (FRR) of not less than 1.5-hr, which was an increase from the 1-hr requirement in the NBCC. The Québec Construction Code has also filed amendments to allow mid-rise wood construction and also limits exit stairwells to use noncombustible construction.
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: in-situ testing of the arbora building for vibration and acoustic performances

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49836
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
FPInnovations Advanced Wood-based Solutions for Mid-rise and High-rise Construction: In-Situ
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
40 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Vibration
Design
Beams
Floors
Language
English
Abstract
This report addresses serviceability issues of tall wood buildings focusing on vibration and sound insulation performance. The sound insulation and vibration performance may not affect building's safety, but affects occupants' comfort and proper operation of the buildings and the funciton of sensitive equipment, consequently the acceptance of midrise and tall wood buildings in market place. Lack of data, knowledge and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings is one of the issues related to design and construction of tall wood buildings.
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: in-situ testing of the Brock Commons 18-Storey building for vibration and acoustic performances

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49837
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
FPInnovations Advanced Wood-based Solutions for Mid-rise and High- rise Construction: In-Situ
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
42 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Vibration
Design
Beams
Floors
Series Number
Transformative Technology ; TT 2018
Language
English
Abstract
This report addresses serviceability issues of tall wood buildings focusing on their vibration and sound insulation performance. The sound insulation and vibration performance may not affect the building’s safety, but affects the occupants’ comfort and the proper operation of the buildings and the function of sensitive equipment, consequently the acceptance of the midrise and tall wood buildings in market place. Lack of data, knowledge and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings is one of the issues related to design and construction of tall wood buildings. The measured and estimated values should also be correlated with actual experiences of the occupants in the building if such information is obtained, for example, through a survey.
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: in-situ testing of the Origine 13-storey building for vibration and acoustic performances

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49852
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
FPInnovations Advanced Wood-based Solutions for Mid-rise and High- rise Construction: In-Situ
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
46 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Vibration
Design
Beams
Floors
Language
English
Abstract
Serviceability performance studied covers three different performance attributes of a building. These attributes are 1) vibration of the whole building structure, 2) vibration of the floor system, typically in regards to motions in a localized area within the entire floor plate, and 3) sound insulation performance of the wall and floor assemblies. Serviceability performance of a building is important as it affects the comfort of its occupants and the functionality of sensitive equipment as well. Many physical factors influence these performances. Designers use various parameters to account for them in their designs and different criteria to manage these performances. Lack of data, knowledge and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings is one of the issues related to design and construction of tall wood buildings. survey.
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: Mid-rise wood exit shaft demonstration fire test report

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49832
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Bénichou, Noureddine
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Service Canadien des Forêts Advanced Wood-based Solutions for Mid-rise and High-rise Construction
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Bénichou, Noureddine
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
48 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Fire
Building code
Residential construction
Language
English
Abstract
FPInnovations conducted a research project to study the construction of mid-rise wood exit shafts in Ontario and Québec. The scope of the project included an investigation into the concerns that have been raised in regards to the use of wood exits in mid-rise buildings, an analysis of recent Canadian fire statistics in residential multi-family structures, and a fire demonstration of a mass timber wall and supported light-frame floor. This report describes the fire demonstration completed as part of this project; this report acts as a supplement to the full project report.
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Advanced wood-based solutions for mid-rise and high-rise construction: proposed vibration-controlled design criterion for supporting beams

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/en/permalink/fpipub49834
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Field
Sustainable Construction
Canadien des Forêts Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Proposed
Author
Hu, Lin J.
Contributor
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
April 2018
Material Type
Research report
Physical Description
15 p.
Sector
Wood Products
Field
Sustainable Construction
Research Area
Advanced Wood Materials
Subject
Wood
Vibration
Design
Beams
Floors
Language
English
Abstract
For wood floor systems, their vibration performance is significantly dependent on the conditions of their supports, specifically the rigidity of the support. Detrimental effects could result if the floor supports do not have sufficient rigidity. This is special ture for floor supporting beams. The problem of vibrating floor due to flexible supporting beams can be solved through proper design of the supporting beams. However, there is currently no criterion set for the minimum requirement for floor supporting beam stiffness to ensure the beam is rigid enough. Designers’ current practice is to use the uniform load deflection criteria specified in the code for designing the supporting beams. This criterion is based on certain ratios of the floor span (e.g. L/360, L/480 etc.). The disadvantage of this approach is that it allows larger deflections for longer-span beams than for shorter beams. This means that engineers have to use their experience and judgement to select a proper ratio, particularly for the long-span beams. Therefore, a better vibration-controlled design criterion for supporting beams is needed. It is recommended to further verify the ruggedness of the proposed stiffness criterion for floor supporting beams using new field supporting beam data whenever they become available.
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665 records – page 1 of 67.